Lovia Gyarkye

Lovia Gyarkye
Lovia Gyarkye's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New York Times The New Republic

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet Ai Weiwei: Yours Truly (2020) Even for those familiar with Ai and his work, the film's offerings of fascinating insights into his personal life and an exploration of the stakes of personal freedom make it a worthy viewing experience. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2020
83% Denise Ho: Becoming the Song (2020) The film does an excellent job of introducing the pop star to unfamiliar audiences, contextualizing her activism and, more broadly, examining the role art can play in shaping our beliefs. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2020
97% The Last Tree (2020) I can't help but be impressed by Amoo's attempts to direct a familiar narrative with such a complicated set of questions. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2020
99% Miss Juneteenth (2020) Instead of just depicting the myriad ways black women carry their communities, the movie goes further to explore how these women and black girls support each other in a world that often fails them. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 18, 2020
94% For They Know Not What They Do (2019) Its success comes from interrogating the cultural assumption that there is no space for a range of sexual orientations and gender identities within religious communities. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
93% Becoming (2020) Obama's multicity conversations are invigorating, offering more personal insights and showing sharper versions of her signature charm and humor. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
93% Uncorked (2020) "Uncorked" joins a growing body of work - cinematic and otherwise - that upends stereotypes about black people around the world. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2020
66% Troop Zero (2020) What "Troop Zero" lacks in complexity, it makes up for in heart. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2020
98% Whose Streets? (2017) Told from the perspective of activists, artists, and residents, Whose Streets? is a commemoration of and tribute to the humans of Ferguson. - The New Republic EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
99% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) Its thesis is tired and worn. But this is not the fault of the film, just of a country that refuses to truly bear witness. - The New Republic EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2017