Manny Farber

Manny Farber
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
100% The Lusty Men (1952) Mitchum ts the most convincing cowboy I've seen in horse opry, meeting every situation with the lonely, distant calm of a master cliché-dodger. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
80% The Thief (1952) It is a show in which the camera, the framing and handling of scenes, is the major concern. The Crouse-Greene team figure out their camera shots to hold back the unexpected until the right split second. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
88% Come Back, Little Sheba (1952) Come Back, Little Sheba, Hal Wallis's high-priced entry for the Academy awards, is not so much a good picture about a dismal, twenty-year i old marriage as a somewhat funny and ! touching play that someone failed to make into a movie. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
86% Kansas City Confidential (The Secret Four) (1952) It tells a story without gimmicks or short cuts, and all the people involved -- director Karleson, actors Elam, Van Cleef, Brand -- were not only concerned with the best way to express the material on hand but obviously enjoying themselves. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
97% Limelight (1952) Throughout, Chaplin's comedy-drama doesn't produce one belly laugh, but hardly a gesture in it Jacks grace, point, or perfection. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
83% The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952) The Snows of Kilimanjaro is mainly lacking in a sense of when enough is enough. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet The Happy Time (1952) The Happy Time takes a sweet look at a twelve-year-old being indoctrinated into the mysteries of life in 1910 in Ottawa. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
63% What Price Glory? (1952) What Price Glory? owes its spark and vitality to the Cagney-Dailey acting team, which doesn't seem bothered by having to shoulder the oldest luggage of slapstick and pathos. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet Young Man with Ideas (1952) The movie's humor is derived from Leisen's knowing how to keep his people fairly smart in dumb situations, sensitive in slapstick scenes, and just selfish enough when they are being their most virtuous. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet My Man and I (1952) My Man and is a flag-waving love story; one of the worst. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
90% The Leopard Man (1943) This film still seems to be one of Hollywood's original gems -- nothing impure in terms of cinema, nothing imitative about its style, and little that misses fire through a lack of craft. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet The Ring (1952) Well worth seeing for such episodes as dreary bus trips to small California fight towns, the educational depiction of a trainer's chores, the tired routine that goes on after a losing fight. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
84% Pat and Mike (1952) Its chief trouble is that it is packed with such long-drawn- out scenes as golfers lining up for crucial putts and carefully tapping a ball that is predestined by the script either to drop in or not to. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
78% A Place in the Sun (1951) There is enough gimmicky, pretentious footage to keep one's eyes glued to the screen while one's common sense and muscles beg for respite. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet Appointment With Danger (1951) Appointment with Danger is a fascinating textbook on the Average American Flop -- his speech, mien, sag, misanthropy, doubt. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet The Scarf (1951) It sounds awful but it's kind of interesting. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet The Brave Bulls (1951) The Brave Bulls -- concerning a frightened torero who mysteriously loses his fear in the last five minutes -- is an exercise in powerful photography if not in lucid story-telling. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
89% The Thing from Another World (1951) The Thing (from Another World) is a slick item thriftily combining a heavy science story with a pure adventure yarn for better than ordinary entertainment. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
83% 14 Hours (1951) This spellbinder script by John Paxton is crammed with tricks and messages the size of dinosaur bones. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet The Magnet (1950) [The Magnet] will draw inaudible chuckles from people who never tire of psychiatrist jokes and invented childish antics. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet Teresa (1951) The result is as perversely enjoyable as a Third Avenue El excursion 'with stops in derelict rooms and sauerkraut-odored hallways to show you what terrifies the average New York visitor. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet The Sound of Fury (Try and Get Me!) (1950) In search- ing out odd tidbits of reality, the director (Endfield) deserves a TV set for trying valiantly. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
80% Branded (1950) Ladd, seldom forfeit- ing a character for comic showboating and fancy style, is sold out by direction (Mate) that... loses his impenetrable face in the shade of ten- gallon hats, and takes little advantage of his quick, efficient movements. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
83% The Magnificent Yankee (1950) The theatrical Calhern mauls the process of growing old into a picturesque joke of rheumatism, fatigue, diminishing powers. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
97% Born Yesterday (1950) The success of the picture is due to direction (Cukor) that makes one hyperconscious of visual gags and wastes little time authenticating the brassy Kanin play. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
100% 99 River Street (1953) The plot is routine, but the direction, which seems to dislike anything that smacks of the phrase "don't get excited,'' makes the picture worth seeing. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
80% Island in the Sky (1953) Aerial photography in shivery weather provides some thrills but not enough to make up for Wayne's dreary monologues addressed to himself, the faulty use of stereophonic sound, and the waste of some good actors like Lloyd Nolan and Bob [Steele]. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
32% The Robe (1953) This is the age of elephantine, humorless films that show little if any artistic endeavor. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet Martin Luther (1953) While De Rochemont's film may be somewhat tepid as biography and motionless as a movie, it is unique in its class in that it makes its play more to the mind than to the eye. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet A Second Chance (1953) The actors apparently lose heart when they are shrouded in bad to fair photographic effects. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
97% Stalag 17 (1953) Stalag 17 is a crude, cliché-ridden glimpse of a Nazi prison camp that I hated to see end. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
No Score Yet Le Bonheur (1966) An extended ad for Kodak, this movie is the esthetic opposite of Le Ben Hur: no action, no costumes, much all-round kissing, forest trampling. - Cavalier EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
71% Les Bonnes Femmes (The Good Girls) (1960) The girls' stories get gulped down too briskly, and the film is much more glamorized than the clerk subject demands, simply because Chabrol does what every New Waver does in a tight spot: he... begins mimicking the revered Hitchcock. - Cavalier EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 24, 2020
44% The Moon Is Blue (1953) The Moon Is Blue is a small comedy that seems to sparkle, sound monotonous, look machine-made, and appear smartly guided at the same moment. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
No Score Yet Bright Road (1953) The movie has a surprise gift of humor and humanity. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
75% Angel Face (1952) Angel Face is a congested thriller that kills off all its actors with modern sports cars. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
No Score Yet The President's Lady (1953) The President's Lady is a studiously dull picture about wild young Andrew Jackson and the trouble he had with the divorce laws of his time. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
80% I Confess (1952) Hitchcock's new melodrama, I Confess, has negated the realism to settle for the "effects." - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
No Score Yet Destination Gobi (1953) Well composed out of a succession of panoramic shots and fast action scenes, the film suffers from Wise's loss of contact with realism in acting. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
100% The Naked Spur (1953) Perhaps there is too much predictable plot complication here to please old Anthony Mann fans, but his particular gifts are evident anyway. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
No Score Yet Jeopardy (1953) Only as individual a director as Sturges could have concocted anything worth seeing out of Jeopardy. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
70% Moulin Rouge (1952) Huston has crowded such an attractive world around the subject of this biography -- such surging impressions of Parisian activities -- that you never get a good line on the artist himself. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
86% The Member of the Wedding (1952) Though he Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers's prize-winning play about the last days of childhood, betrays its stage origin on the screen, it has been made into a somewhat amusing, and moving, sometimes improbable picture. - The Nation EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2020
40% Beyond the Law (1967) Mailer's Beyond the Law has a zillion little irritations, but it has authentic scurrility and funk before it goes sour with Mailer's Irish brogue monologue. - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2020
91% Signs of Life (1968) Very ephemeral in its charms, Signs has some of the casual goodhearted zaniness that Gassman injects into Easy Life: playing up meandering activity over dialogue, getting all the times of day, the feeling of friendship in its inactive-silent aspects. - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
96% Weekend (1967) The story has charm and piquancy... - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
No Score Yet Four Stars (****) (The 24 Hour Movie) (1967) A morbid, flesh-bound, self-reviling vision... - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2019
87% The Graduate (1967) All this chopped steak is a give-away on the new tone in films; unless the material is thoroughly banal, it isn't considered chic. - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2019
84% In Cold Blood (1967) In Cold Blood is a somber, slablike, all-of-a-piece inclemency that bears little resemblance to the open, cheap-knit style of Capote's writing. - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2019
67% Skammen (Shame) (1968) Shame is a complicated, crazily plotted film that loses most of its development... - Artforum EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2019