Manny Farber Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Manny Farber

Manny Farber
Manny Farber's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
90% Bambi (1942) The bogus art which has been creeping into the Disney pictures is really hammered at you in this one.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2016
90% The Quiet Man (1952) [The script] tends to resolve its problems by having the cast embrace, fraternity-brother fashion, and break out into full-throated ballads.‐ The Nation
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2012
97% Shane (1953) It is a movie that takes its own measured, deliberate time finding ways to increase your pleasure.‐ The Nation
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2012
98% Roman Holiday (1953) The Paramount crew that worked on Roman Holiday reminded me of expert marksmen who had made "charm" their target and seldom if ever missed it.‐ The Nation
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2012
100% Henry V (The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fift with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France) (1946) While definitely athletic, pageant-minded and somewhat recognizable after all of the war dramas that have come out since Elizabethan times, no movie has given a more poignant impression of men in battle or been so cutting about the waste and folly of war.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2012
100% National Velvet (1944) Pandro Berman, the producer, and Clarence Brown, the director, have made it into a conservatively exciting and engaging film whose chief virtue is its acting, especially a letter-perfect, beautifully felt performance by Mickey Rooney as the jockey.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2012
83% Mildred Pierce (1945) The production, mainly because of Michael Curtiz's direction, is unimaginative and badly hoked-up.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2012
94% It's a Wonderful Life (1946) Capra is an old-time movie craftsman, the master of every trick in the bag, and in many ways he is more at home with the medium than any other Hollywood director. But all of his details give the impression of contrived effect.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2012
92% The Pride of the Yankees (1942) Maté achieves exhilaration from his angle shooting and the feeling throughout out of a concave screen. Whatever feel of baseball this picture has is the result of his running camera.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2012
96% The Big Sleep (1946) The Big Sleep, though, is witty and sinister, and in an odd way is a realistic portrayal of big-city life with Arabian Nights overtones.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2012
91% The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) While telling this story, haltingly and clumsily, the movie runs from burdensome through heavy and dull to bad. It stutters and stumbles as Welles submerges Tarkington's story in a mess of radio and stage technique.‐ The New Republic
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2012
98% Sunset Boulevard (1950) An uncompromising study of American decadence displaying a sad, worn, methodical beauty few films have had since the late twenties.‐ The Nation
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2012
92% From Here to Eternity (1953) The result is a gripping movie that often makes you wish its director, Zinnemann, knew as much about American life as he does about the art of telling a story with a camera.‐ The Nation
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2012
100% The Third Man (1949) The movie's verve comes from the abstract use of a jangling zither and from squirting Orson Welles into the plot piece-meal with a tricky, facetious eyedropper.‐ The Nation
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2012