Matt BrunsonMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Matt Brunson

Matt Brunson
Matt Brunson's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/4 79% Mark of the Vampire (1935) The twist ending is a beaut and provides Lugosi with a treasured movie moment. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 17, 2016
2/4 No Score Yet The Return of Doctor X (1939) What makes this one worth a peek is that the role of a pasty-faced zombie-vampire is played by no less than Humphrey Bogart! ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 17, 2016
3/4 75% Doctor X (1932) Doctor X is notable for a number of reasons, including the use of early two-strip Technicolor and the impressive Max Factor makeup. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 17, 2016
3/4 88% The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) Boris Karloff portrays the evil warlord with the right mix of menace and playfulness. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 17, 2016
3.5/4 93% Carrie (1976) Like Jaws, here's one of those rare instances when the movie is better than the book. What's more, this box office hit easily remains the best adaptation of a King property (sorry, Shawshank and Shining groupies). ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 17, 2016
2.5/4 51% The Accountant (2016) Smart movies offer intriguing setups, unique characters and tantalizing plot pirouettes. The Accountant is a smart movie. Smart movies also avoid offering imbecilic narrative coincidences and imploding third acts. Alas, The Accountant isn't THAT smart. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 17, 2016
2.5/4 73% Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970) Caught in the right frame of mind, it offers plenty of groovy sights ... [but] the violent climax is highly problematic. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
1.5/4 31% Valley of the Dolls (1967) The newfound envelope-pushing in cinema, tested so brilliantly in 1967 by Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, is botched here. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
1/4 16% Graffiti Bridge (1990) Visually unappealing and inane at every turn, this one's the absolute pits. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
2/4 33% Under the Cherry Moon (1986) The final stretch is grueling, but the majority is average rather than awful. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
3/4 67% Purple Rain (1984) The drama is clunky, the acting is awful more often than not, and the casual sexism simmers throughout. But whenever Prince takes the stage to perform one of his sizzling songs, the picture irresistibly exudes sex, sweat and swagger in equal measure. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
2/4 64% Lady in White (1988) There's wasted potential to spare in Lady in White, a low-key ghost tale that does just enough right to make the overall disappointment more pronounced. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
3/4 72% The Birth of a Nation (2016) Whatever one thinks of the messenger, the delivered movie is worthy of attention. It's a film for the here and now, a document that nicely supports the BlackLivesMatter movement (and throws shade on the AllLivesMatter nonsense). ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
2/4 43% The Girl on the Train (2016) The herrings in The Girl on the Train might be the usual shade of robust red, but the film itself is largely a bloodless affair, not so much a whodunit as a wellobviouslythatpersondunit. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 8, 2016
3.5/4 97% Johnny Guitar (1954) Feminism, Freud and firearms all figure in this exemplary yarn that also takes aim at the blacklisting that was tearing apart the film industry. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2.5/4 70% Highlander (1986) It's easy to see why many love this picture (great premise, fine action scenes, a score by Queen, Connery) but just as easy to see why many despise it (cheesy production values, stone-faced Lambert, ludicrous supporting characters, thudding dialogue). ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
1.5/4 No Score Yet Caboblanco (Cabo Blanco) (1981) Remaking a unique classic like Casablanca would be an act of sheer folly, so here we have a movie that kinda-sorta-maybe-vaguely can be called a remake. Even without comparisons, this one's a snoozer. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
3/4 71% Tenebre (Unsane) (1982) Argento delights in tripping up audiences with startling plot twists and bursts of extreme violence. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2.5/4 62% Stephen King's It (1990) The entire project deflates just as it should be building to a crescendo, and the final battle proves to be a crushing disappointment. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
3/4 69% Stephen King's 'Cat's Eye' (1985) Rather than serving as distractions, the self-referential shout-outs fit the overall mix of horror and humor. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
3.5/4 85% Salem's Lot (1979) Small-screen restrictions require the bloodletting be kept to a minimum, but director Tobe Hooper and scripter Paul Monash nevertheless manage to construct a first-rate chiller out of King's fertile source material. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2/4 56% Raising Cain (1992) An off-center carbon copy of De Palma's superb 1980 hit Dressed to Kill, coming off as hokey and jokey rather than clever and suspenseful. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2/4 53% Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey (1991) William Sadler steals the film with his hilarious turn as The Grim Reaper ... but aside from a few chuckles, the remainder is overstuffed and overindulgent. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2.5/4 77% Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure (1989) The script by Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon is more clever in the small details than in the broad strokes. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2.5/4 31% Masterminds (2016) Nobody would ever mistake Masterminds for a good movie ... but it would be criminal to deny the huge laughs strewn throughout, sneakily exploding like depth charges at random intervals. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2.5/4 64% Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) The plotholes are plentiful at Miss Peregrine's Home, but so is the razzle dazzle. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Oct 2, 2016
2/4 No Score Yet The Monster of Piedras Blancas (1958) Some clumsy plotting and an overly familiar template render this no more than average. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
3.5/4 94% Blood Simple (1984) Not just noteworthy as the first picture written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, this excellent neo-noir also stands as an important film in the development of the American independent cinema during the 1980s. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
3.5/4 50% Yours, Mine and Ours (1968) Forget that awful 2005 version starring Dennis Quaid and Rene Russo. For the real deal, check out the delightful 1968 original. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
2/4 No Score Yet Grandview U.S.A. (1984) Swayze manages to create some sympathy for his character, but everything else about this picture, from the tepid romantic triangle to the awkward music-video segments, barely rises above silly. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
3/4 86% My Bodyguard (1980) The script by Alan Ormsby never decides whether violence is the problem or the solution, but his teen protagonists feel real. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
3/4 96% High Noon (1952) It's the film's brevity that prevents it from soaring, since the stripped-down narrative generally allows only the widest of brush strokes when it comes to painting the characters and their situations. Cooper's performance is masterful, however. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
4/4 93% Cat People (1942) A masterpiece of the genre: No less than Martin Scorsese has stated that the movie is "as important as Citizen Kane in the maturation of the American cinema." ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
4/4 93% Beauty and the Beast (1991) The first animated film to ever earn a Best Picture Oscar nomination, this is as good as anything ever produced by the studio. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
1.5/4 61% Twin Peaks - Fire Walk with Me (1992) An ungainly and unnecessary prequel to the excellent TV series. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
1.5/4 43% The Hollars (2016) An agonizing exercise in indie quirk. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
2.5/4 63% The Magnificent Seven (2016) The action scenes are well-staged if deeply impersonal -- in fact, much of the film feels rote and mechanical, less a vibrant throwback to vintage Westerns and more a marketing campaign in search of meaning. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 25, 2016
1/4 No Score Yet 13 Frightened Girls (The Candy Web) (1963) Perhaps the worst film William Castle ever made. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
2.5/4 33% Mr. Sardonicus (1961) This handsome but occasionally meandering drama admittedly makes creative use of several nasty leeches. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
3/4 78% Homicidal (1961) While traveling along similar lines as Psycho, director William Castle and scripter Robb White manage to include enough originality that the shock ending still has the power to catch many viewers off guard. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
3/4 36% 13 Ghosts (1960) Slender but fun. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
1/4 22% Patch Adams (1998) The worst film of 1998 was also one of the worst films of its entire decade, but it panders so shamelessly in an effort to manipulate every conceivable human emotion that it was instantly embraced by easy-to-please filmgoers. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
2/4 No Score Yet Zombie Holocaust (1982) Zombie Holocaust could easily have been called Cannibal Holocaust had another Italian gorefest from the same period not already snagged that title. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
2/4 No Score Yet Psycho IV: The Beginning (1991) A feeble addition to the Norman Bates canon. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
3.5/4 85% Maggie's Plan (2016) Many have compared Maggie's Plan to earlier works by Woody Allen, though I was reminded more of the output of Noah Baumbach -- at any rate, either comparison works. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
3/4 100% Ingrid Bergman in Her Own Words (Jag är Ingrid) (2015) This isn't the usual cine-doc that relies heavily on movie clips -- instead, the screen scenes are more like a couple of minutes from Autumn Sonata, a few seconds from Casablanca, a solitary still from Spellbound. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
3.5/4 97% Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman, both gorgeous beyond measure, strike sparks as the sexually unfulfilled Maggie and her tortured husband Brick, while Burl Ives is sensational as the family patriarch Big Daddy. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
2/4 43% The Angry Birds Movie (2016) So now even social apps are being turned into feature films? At this rate, should we expect Internet Meme: The Movie next? ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
3.5/4 96% Midnight Run (1988) An extremely satisfying action-comedy, one that STILL hasn't fully received its due. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016
2.5/4 70% The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai (1984) It's easy to see the appeal, what with its loopy characters, its loopy plot, and its loopy dialogue -- it's just a shame there's not more lurking underneath all that surface quirk. ‐ Creative Loafing
Posted Sep 17, 2016