MFB Critics Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

MFB Critics

MFB Critics
MFB Critics's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Monthly Film Bulletin

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Windbag the Sailor (1936) The story though not strong and rather slowly developed is an excellent vehicle -- and a new one -- for Will Hay's particular kind of humour and fooling and he is in good form.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet The Winds of Change (1960) The film, as its pretentious title implies, takes too much upon itself.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Two Thousand Women (1944) Though the balance of humour and dramatic suspense is good, the film is lacking in realism. However, taken solely from an entertainment angle, it may be enjoyed for its snappy dialogue and good comedy angles.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Turned Out Nice Again (1941) Admirers of George Formby will find little for complaint in this film, though it differs from his previous comedies in that the story is less improbable than usual and contains very little slapstick.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet The Gay Lady (Trottie True) (1949) The film hovers on the edge of a charm, humour and style which it never quite attains.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
83% Tonite Let's All Make Love in London (1967) Peter Whitehead's fragmented look at the "swinging" London first brought to light by Time magazine is in some ways a fascinating document of contemporary mores. But as a film in its own right, it is confused, imitative and finally self-destructive.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Yield to the Night (1956) As a plea against capital punishment, the producers' conception of their drama seems to lack passion, and this makes it difficult to assimilate the film's emotional climate.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
60% X: The Unknown (1956) After a series of prolonged climaxes, with its potential victims staring directly into the camera and shaking with fright, the "Unknown" finally emerges as a type of rolling rubber mattress, disappointingly unhorrific in content and appearance.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
80% Woman in a Dressing Gown (1957) The facile ending, with its suggestion of "happy ever after", is in line with the compromising attitude of the film as a whole; and rings entirely false. ‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
88% The Conqueror Worm (Witchfinder General) (2000) Visually, the theme is beautifully supported by Reeves' subtle use of colour, in which the delicate patchwork greens of the English countryside are shot through by the colours of death and decay as Matthew Hopkins prowls through it robed in black.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
50% The Witches (The Devil's Own) (1966) After a crude opening sequence of poor Joan Fontaine being frightened out of her wits by a prancing witch-doctor in an African hut, this very enjoyable thriller settles down more calmly to make good use of Nigel Kneale's highly literate script.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
100% Whistle Down the Wind (1961) Bryan Forbes, directing for the first time, reveals a painstaking, often incisive talent for behaviour rather than a marked personal style.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Western Approaches (1944) Through arduous months of filming at sea -- and using not professional actors but serving officers and men -- Dalrymple and Jackson have created a dramatic essay in realism which equals any comparable treatment of their subject.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet We Dive at Dawn (1943) The direction achieves agonies of suspense and thrills. The model work is somewhat weak, but the location shots atone for everything.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet The Way to the Stars (1945) No other film has so subtly and so truthfully portrayed the life of the airman in war, its problems, its hazards, its exaggerated casualness towards death, its courage, its humour, its comradeship.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
100% The Way Ahead (The Immortal Battalion) (1945) From a thorough, thoughtful and lively script by Eric Ambler and Peter Ustinov, this is an outstanding piece of film-making from the viewpoint of production, direction, camera-work and acting.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Waterloo Road (1945) In both writing and directing, Gilliat has achieved a remarkable degree of sincerity, of fidelity to background and character.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Violent Playground (1958) It is very sad that such a wonderful opportunity to make a true to life film on such an important theme has been allowed, once again, to slip away.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Unearthly Stranger (1964) One can pick holes in the script, but in the long run ingenuity and suspense pay off handsomely. The climax in particular is as satisfying as it is bleak.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Trouble in Store (1953) Norman Wisdom brings to the screen his well-known stage personality, "the little man against the world," and with it its basic weakness -- its dependence on a first-rate script, which he lacks in this film.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2018
No Score Yet Tomorrow At Ten (1964) Robert Shaw is chillingly effective in an intelligent performance which, for about twenty minutes deludes one into thinking that Lance Comfort's direction is much better than it really is.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Together (1956) Concerned with the sadness and desolation of life in a city, with the melancholy landscape in which the helpless loneliness of the deaf-mutes is only part of a general sadness, Together draws one remarkably into its world.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Titfield Thunderbolt (2005) The script itself is disconcertingly short on wit, and some of its invention appears forced, and Crichton's handling fails to supply the charm that could still have been the film's justification.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet They Were Sisters (1945) Although it could not be called striking or outstanding, this is an interesting film which leaves its own kind of quiet satisfaction.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Winslow Boy (1949) This is quite definitely a film to see and enjoy.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Target for Tonight (1941) It dramatises reality and is very successful in conveying atmosphere.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet A Tale of Two Cities (1958) A straightforward adaptation which follows the events of Dickens' crowded narrative with commendable fidelity. The pure excitement of the book is missing, however; and the fault lies mostly with T. E. B. Clarke's reverent but somewhat lifeless script.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Sweeney Todd - The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (1936) There are several inconsistencies in the development of the plot, but a certain amount of the necessarily gruesome atmosphere has been caught and the story itself is so good that the film has some success. ‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
93% Summertime (1955) The script maintains slightly the tone of an impeccably smooth and glossy novelette, romantic rather than sentimental, but scarcely concerned to explore its situation very deeply.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Summer Holiday (1963) A star vehicle for Cliff Richard that aims high, but continually slops into the second-rate through lack of inventiveness in narrative and dancing.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Story of Gilbert And Sullivan (1953) The respectfully dull costume productions of the Korda group since 1947 find full scope in this frightfully proper account of the work of "two great men of the Victorian stage".‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
89% The Stars Look Down (1940) The scenario writer has wisely concentrated on a well-knit and straightforward plot. The result is thoroughly holding entertainment.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Square Peg (1958) Norman Wisdom is too unrelaxed, too self-conscious as yet, to be one of the great screen comedians.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Queen of Destiny (Sixty Glorious Years) (1938) The treatment is necessarily and inevitably episodic, but the incidents are admirably chosen, and the balance is skilfully kept between pageantry and human interest.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Secret Place (1957) The Secret Place is a modest production, but it develops conventional material with an encouraging sense of enterprise.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Piccadilly Incident (1946) It remains quite an entertaining film... but it certainly seems a pity that so promising a beginning should have tailed off to such an unsatisfactory ending.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Old Bones of the River (1938) This is a roaring farce which gets steadily more and more funny as it proceeds.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Elephant Gun (Nor the Moon by Night) (1958) It is sad that such resources should have been squandered on material of pulp magazine level, in which neither character nor incident nor theme has any coherence or interest.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Spring in Park Lane (1949) Here an old and sorely tried story has been taken and transformed by Nicholas Phipps into a brilliant script bubbling over with gaiety and wit.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Spider and the Fly (1949) There is no doubt that the undertones throughout are fascinating, but the dramatic possibilities of the subject are only half realised. ‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
73% Breaking the Sound Barrier (The Sound Barrier) (1952) Its shortcomings in presenting character and human situation seem the more disappointing in view of its conspicuous success in conveying both the excitements and something of the mystique of flying.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Song of Freedom (1937) The story is unusual and well thought out‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Song of Ceylon (1934) The direction, photography and editing of this film place it in a class by itself as an imaginative, and at the same time, strictly documentary, presentation of the island of Ceylon.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet Smokescreen (1990) Although familiar in style and idiom, this pleasant little mystery story has a few features that lift it out of the ordinary.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Smallest Show on Earth (1957) The whole weight of this gay idea is carried by Bernard Miles, Margaret Rutherford and Peter Sellers... Outside these three, the film is a rather poor example of conventional British screen comedy, with stock characters and situations.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
83% The Small Back Room (1952) The most terrific suspense is achieved during this last sequence which more than compensates for any of the film's shortcomings.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Sleeping Tiger (1954) There is a splendour about this film, which has one of the most absurdly extravagant plots on record, and never flinches from it.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2018
No Score Yet The Singer Not the Song (1961) Though The Singer Not the Song misses the strongly individual flavour of, say, The Sleeping Tiger, it is nevertheless a strangely compelling film. This is mainly due to the presence of Bogarde himself.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 11, 2018
No Score Yet Sing As We Go (2014) Though Gracie Fields is herself rather than the character she plays this will be regarded as no reason for criticism by her enthusiastic followers who will draw great amusement from the typical Lancashire humour throughout.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2018
No Score Yet Simon and Laura (1955) Handsomely mounted and more sophisticated than the usual run of British comedies, Simon and Laura provides a gentle but sometimes telling satire at the expense of the BBC and the acting profession.‐ Monthly Film Bulletin
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2018