Mordaunt Hall Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Mordaunt Hall

Mordaunt Hall
Mordaunt Hall's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New York Times

Movie Reviews Only

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Showing 51 - 100 of 103
Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
2/5 88%

Arsenal (1928)

"Although one is impelled to be in thorough sympathy with its argument against war, one cannot but help feeling that one-fourth of the footage of this production would be ample for one sitting." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
5/5 100%

The Gold Rush (1925)

"Here is a comedy with streaks of poetry, pathos, tenderness, linked with brusqueness and boisterousness." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 90%

The Manxman (1929)

"Filled with enchanting scenes and the story itself is quite well told." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
100%

The Last Command (1928)

"If there are moments when Mr. Jannings holds the same expression and pose too long, you are rewarded for the most part with a brilliant performance in which there is a wealth of imagination." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
98%

Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927)

"Mr. Murnau proves by Sunrise that he can do just as fine work in Hollywood as he ever did in Germany." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
100%

Spite Marriage (1929)

"Words can hardly tell of the relief it was to look at Mr. Keaton's imaginative but silly silent antics in his latest farce, Spite Marriage." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 No Score Yet

The Eagle (1925)

"This is a satisfying picture in which Mr. Brown introduces some interesting touches." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
97%

The Passion of Joan of Arc (La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc) (1928)

"It is the gifted performance of Maria Falconetti as the Maid of Orleans that rises above everything in this artistic achievement." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
64%

The Bat Whispers (1930)

"It is a well-directed film, but it seems rather a waste of time for Mr. West, for there is nothing new even in this bigger and better Bat." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
3.5/5 89%

The Farmer's Wife (1928)

"It has been nicely directed with a keen eye for the sunlight and shadows over the winding country roads, and the indoor scenes are always correct as to furnishings." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 100%

Trader Horn (1931)

"This shrewdly fashioned jungle melodrama proved to be thoroughly exciting to the spectators last night and it seemed as though many of them were a bit nearer than they ever wanted to be to a big game hunt." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
4.5/5 100%

Greed (1925)

"Mr. von Stroheim has not missed a vulgar point, but on the other hand his direction of the effort is cunningly dramatic." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
2/5 88%

Michael (1924)

"A dull piece of work, redeemed only by some artistic scenes and Benjamin Christensen's able portrayal of Claude Zoret, an artist." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
5/5 88%

Moana (1926)

"It is a joyful and at the same time a thoroughly artistic contribution to motion pictures." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
4/5 43%

Alibi (1929)

"It is by far the best of the gangster films, and the fact that it is equipped with dialogue makes it all the more stirring." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
2/5 71%

The Wedding March (1928)

"Because of what they are called upon to do and not because of the performances of the players the characters are not much more human than a troupe of Robots." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
29%

The Struggle (1931)

"Neither Miss Loos, Mr. Emerson nor Mr. Griffith can be said to have accomplished anything particularly novel by this screen work." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 25, 2006
57%

Blonde Venus (1932)

"A muddled, unimaginative and generally hapless piece of work, relieved somewhat by the talent and charm of the German actress and Herbert Marshall's valiant work in a thankless rôle." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
3.5/5 57%

Mata Hari (1932)

"A glamourous and romantic conception of the latter days of the life of the Dutch dancer and courtesan who was shot as a spy by the French in 1917." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
5/5 100%

Scarface (1932)

"The slaughter in Scarface, the Shame of a Nation, the Howard Hughes gangster production... is like that of a Shakespearean tragedy" ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
4/5 76%

Hell's Angels (1930)

"These air scenes, with the crashing of flaming planes, have never been matched on the screen." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
5/5 91%

Tabu: A Story of the South Seas (1931)

"It is like a picture poem, with its sunshine and happiness in the beginning and its stormy drama in the end." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
4/5 94%

Der Blaue Engel (The Blue Angel) (1930)

"Not only is Mr. Jannings's and Miss Dietrich's acting excellent, but they are supported by an unusually competent cast." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
2/5 17%

The Skin Game (1931)

"Mr. Galsworthy's narrative is bound to enlist one's attention, but Mr. Hitchcock, who is responsible for the adaptation as well as the direction, cannot be said to have accomplished either task in a fashion the subject deserves." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
89%

Queen Christina (1933)

"A skillful blend of history and fiction in which the Nordic star, looking as alluring as ever, gives a performance which merits nothing but the highest praise. She appears every inch a queen." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
5/5 100%

Shanghai Express (1932)

"It is by all odds the best picture Josef von Sternberg has directed." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
3/5 No Score Yet

The Criminal Code (1931)

"Granted that Howard Hawks's direction is for the most part intelligent and firm, there are occasional sequences which he spoils by extravagant ideas or by leaving too little to the imagination." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
2.5/5 85%

Zemlya (Earth) (Soil) (1930)

"Much of this film is chaotic, especially during the church episode and some of the closing scenes." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
4/5 96%

Horse Feathers (1932)

"Some of the fun is even more reprehensible than the doings of these clowns in previous films, but there is no denying that their antics and their patter are helped along by originality and ready wit." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
83%

As You Desire Me (1932)

"[Garbo] rises far above the story as it comes to the screen, but because of her impeccable performance the picture never fails to captivate one's interest." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
3/5 96%

Island of Lost Souls (1933)

"Although the attempt to horrify is not accomplished with any marked degree of subtlety, there is no denying that some of the scenes are ingenously fashioned and are, therefore, interesting." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
90%

Sous les Toits de Paris (Under the Roofs of Paris) (1930)

"This picture becomes somewhat tedious after the first half. The introductory scenes, however, are highly satisfactory, particularly when M. Clair has a fancy for a little irony." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
5/5 98%

City Lights (1931)

"A film worked out with admirable artistry." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
100%

The Invisible Man (1933)

"It is hardly necessary to dwell upon the performances of the cast beyond saying that they all rise to the demands of their parts. As for the settings, they seem very real, and the direction and acting of the uniformed police force are unusually good." ‐New York Times
Posted Jan 28, 2006
2.5/5 90%

Pandora's Box (1929)

"Miss Brooks is attractive and she moves her head and eyes at the proper moment, but whether she is endeavoring to express joy, woe, anger or satisfaction it is often difficult to decide." ‐New York Times
Posted Mar 27, 2005
5/5 100%

A Nous la Liberté (Liberty for Us) (1931)

"A Nous, la Liberté is assuredly different from any other screen feature. It bristles with strange originality." ‐New York Times
Posted Jun 12, 2003
91%

Little Caesar (1931)

"The production is ordinary and would rank as just one more gangster film but for two things. One is the excellence of Mr. Burnett's credible and compact story. The other is Edward G. Robinson's wonderfully effective performance. " ‐New York Times
Posted May 24, 2003
86%

Grand Hotel (1932)

"It is a production thoroughly worthy of all the talk it has created and the several motion-picture luminaries deserve to feel very proud of their performances, particularly Greta Garbo and Lionel Barrymore." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
4/5 97%

The Thin Man (1934)

"An excellent combination of comedy and excitement." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
93%

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931)

"Fredric March is the stellar performer in this blood-curdling shadow venture." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
91%

Dracula (1931)

"With Mr. Browning's imaginative direction and Mr. Lugosi's makeup and weird gestures, this picture succeeds to some extent in its grand guignol intentions." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
98%

King Kong (1933)

"Through multiple exposures, processed 'shots' and a variety of angles of camera wizardry the producers set forth an adequate story and furnish enough thrills for any devotee of such tales." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
5/5 100%

M (1931)

"[An] important film which rightly deserves its success." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
4/5 60%

One Night of Love (1934)

"An enjoyable light diversion, one worthy of the charm and talent of its stellar performer." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
98%

All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

"Messrs. Milestone, Abbott and Anderson in this film have contributed a memorable piece of work to the screen." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
5/5 92%

Little Women (1933)

"The film begins in a gentle fashion and slips away smoothly without any forced attempt to help the finish to linger in the minds of the audience." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
4/5 88%

Twentieth Century (1934)

"There is many a witty remark in this harum-scarum adventure." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
4/5 91%

Trouble in Paradise (1932)

"In virtually every scene the lively imagination of the German producer shines forth and it seems as though he were the only person in Hollywood who could have turned out such an effective entertainment from such a feathery story." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
59%

Cavalcade (1933)

"It is a most affecting and impressive picture." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
94%

Duck Soup (1933)

"This production is, for the most part, extremely noisy without being nearly as mirthful as [the Marx brothers'] other films." ‐New York Times
Posted May 20, 2003
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Showing 51 - 100 of 103