Noah Gittell Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Noah Gittell

Noah Gittell
Noah Gittell's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Atlantic, Washington City Paper, Nerdist, Movie Mezzanine

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
91% Maudie (2017) Maudie is a slow, earnest film that pleasantly subverts the narrow-minded hagiography we expect from the story of an artist.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 23, 2017
70% Manifesto (2017) For anyone who has ever said, "Cate Blanchett is such a great actress that I would watch her read the phone book," Manifesto is here to hold you accountable.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 9, 2017
92% I, Daniel Blake (2017) It's a film about the unsustainable condition of being poor and alive, which admittedly sounds like a grueling experience. But I, Daniel Blake seeks understanding -- it seeks to connect -- and understanding is innately hopeful.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
73% The Commune (Kollektivet) (2017) It doesn't work. With its reliance on cliché and a superficial understanding of its characters, The Commune fails to hit a surprising note.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted May 26, 2017
85% The Lovers (2017) We experience The Lovers as its characters live their lives: teetering on the precipice, reveling in uncertainty, and loving every moment of it.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted May 12, 2017
92% Finding Oscar (2017) The fog of filmmaking is only slightly clearer than the fog of war, but most of the time the power of Finding Oscar shines through.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2017
97% Graduation (Bacalaureat) (2017) With shrewd filmmaking and emotional sensitivity, Mungiu creates meaning and symbolism in every shot without ever losing the poetry of the moment.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2017
96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) It's a modestly budgeted, exquisitely made drama about adult characters who change in small but meaningful ways. Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda has been turning them out for a quarter century.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Mar 31, 2017
46% Wilson (2017) It is exactly the movie it wants to be, yet what it wants to be is so fundamentally wrong.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2017
67% Life (2017) This is a B-movie not an epic... It only wants to thrill you, not impress you or challenge your worldview.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2017
79% Personal Shopper (2017) Stewart grounds the existential horror film in raw emotion she'd apparently kept hidden beneath hipster cool and youthful affectation. For those grumps who refuse to see her as anything but the girl from Twilight, it is finally time to give up the ghost‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Mar 17, 2017
94% Neruda (2016) Larrain evokes the comfort of good fiction in every shot and every scene, even as his characters struggle to find the truth amid propaganda and lies. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Mar 12, 2017
99% Get Out (2017) Get Out, a thrilling first feature by Jordan Peele (of the sketch comedy show Key & Peele) is both a racial satire and a horror film, and while it doesn't quite succeed as either one, it ends up being more than the sum of its parts.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2017
100% 2017 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Live Action (2017) The live-action shorts are, on the whole, a stronger bunch‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
98% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) I Am Not Your Negro is told with riveting artistry, which ends up being both a strength and a weakness. Weaving these connected elements into a single vision, Peck ends up mesmerizing the audience more than rousing them.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2017
92% Toni Erdmann (2016) Toni Erdmann is a delight, a masterpiece of subtlety, and a rich comedy of eras.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017
96% Spotlight (2015) The subtle, egoless performances by the cast frees the audience up to invest in the facts of the story, which McCarthy insists take precedent over the characters.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2017
93% Anomalisa (2015) It's emotionally intense and wonderfully internal.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2017
96% Paterson (2016) In a world beset by divisions and distractions, so much depends on Paterson, who looks at the world with clear eyes and finds beauty in the ordinary. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2017
81% Author: The JT LeRoy Story (2016) On the whole, it succeeds for the questions it asks, not the ones it cheaply answers.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2017
89% Loving (2016) Loving makes you feel like you're in the hands of a confident director who isn't afraid to let the audience find their way into a story. His style prevents the film from being a crowd-pleaser, but it's the right approach for the story.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2017
85% Hail, Caesar! (2016) The Coens, for once, aren't interested in plot at all, instead choosing to luxuriate in the styles of yesteryear. Johansson and Channing Tatum get to do glamorous musical numbers; Clooney has a ball with his swords-and-sandals epic.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2017
96% The Love Witch (2016) If you're prone to acid flashbacks, watch out. Although it takes place in contemporary times (note the cell phones), Biller films the proceedings with a day-glo palette that resembles the Technicolor movies of a bygone era.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2016
96% Manchester by the Sea (2016) Too often here you feel the fingers of the writer, typing the story into existence, crafting it to its desired ends.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 23, 2016
87% Hacksaw Ridge (2016) There is something refreshing about a commercial film that challenges us with juxtaposition and refuses to placate its base, particularly in this gerrymandered political era.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Nov 3, 2016
95% The Handmaiden (Ah-ga-ssi) (2016) How seriously can we take the film's rejection of systematic male oppression when it so blatantly objectifies its women?‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 27, 2016
92% Certain Women (2016) Some movies punch you in the gut. Others barely graze the skin but gnaw at you long after they finish. Certain Women is the second kind.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 20, 2016
99% Cameraperson (2016) Turns out the person behind the camera is just like the rest of us.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2016
72% The Birth of a Nation (2016) The Birth of a Nation isn't good enough to make us forget the offscreen context, and that's nobody's fault but Parker's.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2016
78% American Honey (2016) "[T]here are no boogeymen in fever dreams, only in nightmares."‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2016
81% Author: The JT LeRoy Story (2016) It succeeds for the questions it asks, not the ones it cheaply answers.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
51% Mascots (2016) It contains jokes of the lowest possible degree of difficulty, and the laughs it earns from them are frustratingly fleeting.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
77% Goat (2016) Goat depicts a sheep among wolves, and the only scenes that feel untrue are the ones that imply the sheep are winning. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2016
1.5/5 63% The Magnificent Seven (2016) Most of these characters barely register as human at all for the first two-thirds of the film, in which they are virtually indestructible.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2016
5/5 93% Arrival (2016) A film of rare vision and beauty, Arrival is easily the most intelligent blockbuster released this year-and maybe any year.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2016
4.5/5 98% Moonlight (2016) With repressed men of all races increasingly finding reason to lash out, Moonlight asks us to put down our arms and open our hearts.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2016
2/5 87% A Monster Calls (2017) For those kids who lock into its frequency, A Monster Calls could be a film that changes their lives. For the rest of us, it's a very admirable failure.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2016
4.5/5 93% La La Land (2016) La La Land isn't mere homage. It captures the soul of the genre, creating a bright, colorful portrait of love and art that miraculously retains its optimism in the face of reality.‐ Nerdist
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2016
47% Complete Unknown (2016) Weisz ably hints at a river of pain underneath her icy hot exterior, but the parameters of her character require her to remain frustratingly out of reach. ‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2016
89% Morris from America (2016) It's as shallowly effective as a bumper sticker.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2016
25% Ben-Hur (2016) The filmmakers of this stagnant remake display all the technical tools needed to achieve greatness, but they lack that most basic of functions: a reason why this story needs to be retold.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2016
93% Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World (2016) Herzog's comfort with life's uncertainties allows him to crawl deep into his dread and tickle the most ferocious beasts‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2016
87% Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) Streep hits all the right notes-the comedic highs and the mournful lows. She never struggles to find the pitch, which almost makes the film's schizophrenic tone seem normal.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2016
99% Don't Think Twice (2016) A melancholic ode to comedic suffering.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Aug 5, 2016
55% Jason Bourne (2016) The joy of film-or any art, really-is in the discovery of something new, and Jason Bourne, for all its competence, is totally devoid of newness.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 29, 2016
85% Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You (2016) It is worth the price of admission for the clips from All in the Family alone.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2016
73% Ghostbusters (2016) The film is not indebted to its women; it's indebted only to the original Ghostbusters.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 15, 2016
93% Tickled (2016) Tickled starts out as a quirky comedy but builds into something dark, menacing, and even profound.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jul 1, 2016
55% The Purge: Election Year (2016) In any other era, it would make a tidy profit and quickly be forgotten. In 2016, it might just be the movie of the year.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 30, 2016
98% The Fits (2016) First-time filmmaker Anna Rose Holmer has crafted a story so poetic and precise that it must be the pure, uncorrupted vision of its creator. It's not a flawless film, but it is perfect in its own way.‐ Washington City Paper
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2016