NYT Staff

NYT Staff
NYT Staff's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New York Times
Publications: New York Times

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
86% Beyond the Rocks (1922) Can the result be called an interesting photoplay? Not by those who want a little character and a little truth in their entertainment, anyhow. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2019
67% Sherlock Holmes (1922) There are several problems, but none of them is of compelling interest, and they are solved as much by the superior knowledge and power of the playwright as by anything Sherlock Holmes is seen to do. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 8, 2019
80% The Miracle Man (1919) One of the triumphs of George Loane Tucker in The Miracle Man is his success in making the story so human -- and acceptable. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2019
No Score Yet Drifting (1923) Although the story has a somewhat abrupt termination, it is nevertheless interesting and in spots quite thrilling. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2019
No Score Yet Red Lantern (1919) Mme. Nazimova's power of vivid impersonation and ability to put meaning into looks and action find full expression. The result is a genuine character... The Red Lantern is rich in detail and ensemble. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2019
56% Salome (1923) You see an exceedingly tame and not remarkably graceful performance that Herod wouldn't have given standing room in his kingdom for. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 29, 2019
80% The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921) Although it has a good deal of the wordiness, erratic tempo and illogical emphasis common to screen adaptations of printed stories, it is nevertheless distinguished from many other works of its kind by genuine cinematographic qualities. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2006
No Score Yet Tess of the Storm Country (1922) With Miss Pickford and the others in the cast to vitalize its characters and John S. Robertson to give them sympathetic direction, the thing comes to life. You find yourself believing it most of the time. Against your better judgment, you enjoy it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
50% The Saphead (1920) As a photoplay, pretending to tell a logical story, it is simply not worth considering.But the writer thoroughly enjoyed Buster Keaton's Bertie. He did not give the character human identity, but he was a most entertaining clown. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
100% The Marriage Circle (1924) It is unalloyed bliss to watch The Marriage Circle. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
89% The Cheat (1915) The picture is much above the average of its kind. But is there any more excuse for this sensational trash than for the old-fashioned melodrama in which half the characters were killed off at the end of the play? - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
100% Blind Husbands (1919) Mr. Stroheim, unlike many directors, grasps the fact that the screen is the place for moving pictures and that whatever is to be done on it with artistic finish, must be done pictorially. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
71% True Heart Susie (1919) Once more, D. W. Griffith, ably assisted by [his cast and crew], has brought meaningful humanity to the screen, more nearly pure, less mixed with artificiality, than it has ever been in a motion picture play, except in other works of Mr. Griffith. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006
100% Nanook of the North (1922) Beside this film the usual photoplay, the so-called "dramatic" work of the screen, becomes as thin and blank as the celluloid on which it is printed. And the photoplay cannot avoid the comparison that exposes its lack of substance. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 25, 2006