Pare Lorentz

Pare Lorentz
Pare Lorentz's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Vanity Fair
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)
Publications: Vanity Fair

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet Take a Chance (1933) James Dunn, Cliff Edwards and a meaningless new score take some of the fun out of the original book. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2019
No Score Yet Christopher Bean (1933) An over-long and slap-stick adaptation of the Sidney Howard play. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2019
No Score Yet Dzhimmi Khiggins (1928) The Russian newsreel was as dull as any home-made product, and the whole thing cost a quarter more than a huge, well-ventilated and fairly clean capitalistic theatre. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2019
No Score Yet Trapeze (1932) Dupont made a talking version of Variety - called Trapeze - with the very lovely Anna Sten and some good camera work to make it entertaining. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 17, 2019
No Score Yet So This Is Africa (1933) Here again there is no basis for comedy, except for the general idea; i.e., a burlesque of the current jungle pictures. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet I Love That Man (1933) There is not one single amusing incident in the picture, and, probably discovering it too late, the producer ends it with a fantastic bit of melodrama. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet A Bedtime Story (1933) [Maurice] Chevalier's latest movie, A Bedtime Story, might as well have been an animated cartoon; might better have been, in fact. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet The Kiss Before the Mirror (1933) There is a pictorial quality about the opening scenes, and a maturity in the dialogue which make a better part of the picture seem true and important. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Goodbye Again (1933) Warren William has been in too many stenographer romances to walk without a director's crutch. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Silver Dollar (1932) It shows Silver Dollar hanging grimly to his store until his grub-stakers make him a millionaire, and then it shows his subsequent wildness in a series of slow, but fairly amusing episodes. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
89% The Golden Age (L'Âge d'Or) (1930) The written synopsis is much more entertaining than the picture, which is a pretentious bore. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Secrets (1933) Secrets was no treasure of a manuscript, hut it at least had a part written for a fullblown woman, and, as played by Margaret Lawrence quite a few years ago, it offered plenty of room for an actress to he womanly and mature. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Christopher Strong (1933) Neither producer, director, nor audience evidently ever once asked the question: what is the picture about? - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
100% M (1931) A beautifully balanced melodrama, well worth space in any language. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Elmer, the Great (1933) If anyone missed the other performances of Elmer they may be surprised to find Joe E. Brown actually playing straight in this one; a task seemingly impossible for Hollywood comedians, but one which adds a great deal to the pleasure of the audience. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Zoo in Budapest (1933) A patent, junglecycle picture, the animals give their usual performances, but [cinematographer Lee] Garmes gave the show a certain charm which was too much for the principals to manage alone. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
86% The Champ (1931) It was, from beginning to end, a moving picture, and not a photographed play, with obvious miniatures, backdrops, and stage sets. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Picture Snatcher (1933) Loud, trivial, illogical comedy thrown together as an excuse for James Cagney to exhibit a series of tricks for the edification of taxi drivers, professional wrestlers, and college boys. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Today We Live (1933) Lacking even a journalistic, contemporary quality, Today We Live is a flimsy business. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Looking Forward (The New Deal) (1933) Looking Forward, is still another movie with a message, and little else. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
86% Gabriel over the White House (1933) The film itself is full of long-winded patriotic speeches which seem peculiarly false. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Storm at Daybreak (1933) Kay Francis is always heavy-handed and lethargic in her work, but in such a production as Storm at Daybreak, she has some authority and an ability to - as the phrase has it - wear her clothes well. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet Captured! (1933) Perhaps it was so botched I just thought there must have been some reason for the production in the first place. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
No Score Yet The Song of Songs (1933) There is a fine atmospheric quality to the picture that is tight and consistent, and there is more music underlying the story than you may realize, hut, even so, it is disappointing. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
90% She Done Him Wrong (1933) She Done Him Wrong is played straight, and to the hilt, and as a result it is good fun. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
93% A Farewell to Arms (1932) Helen Hayes takes the movie, wraps it up, and carries it home with her. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Cynara (1932) As it was in the theatre, it remains: a mild, well-mannered show. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
No Score Yet Fire in the Opera House (Brand in der oper) (1930) A routine, cumbersome, musical production. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet Once in a Lifetime (1932) Emerges from the movie factory weak and trembling and looking itself a great deal like an imitation. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet King of the Jungle (1933) The producer's statement that "a naked white giant, with his civilized sweetheart in his arms" faced it all - "it all" being a faked picture of wild beasts devouring civilized sweethearts - is indicative of what you can expect from The King of the Jungle. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
No Score Yet Only Yesterday (1933) This heavy tragedy does very well as a debut picture for Margaret Sullavan, a young actress of unusual promise. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
100% The Invisible Man (1933) This thriller falters between grim humor and silly comedy. Adapted from the II. C. Wells novel, it has an amusing and legitimate British feeling in its early scenes. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
100% The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933) An English production directed by Frank Capra, with Charles Laughton, his wife, Miss Lanchester, some attractive girls, and the most civilized scenario of the season. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
No Score Yet Eskimo (1934) Shrewd editing and two handsome Eskimos put this in the first flight of Nature melodramas. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
92% Duck Soup (1933) Obviously desperate for material, the Four Marx Brothers tried everything from musical comedy sequences to a I-et 'Em Eat Cake burlesque revolution. An uneven production but some of the sketches are worth the money. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
71% Design for Living (1933) Ben Hecht moved Noel Coward's hoys from London to Chicago with fair results. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
90% Bombshell (Blonde Bombshell) (1933) One of the funniest pictures of the year. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
82% The Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933) Had the director kept his story under control The Wax Museum might have been a good horror production. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
93% Island of Lost Souls (1933) I objected to The Island of Lost Souls merely because it was dull, and, too, because of a gruesome conclusion in an operating room. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
58% Cavalcade (1933) When one forgets the pace, the flow, and the really dignified and lovely quality of the picture - which is easier said than done - one can hear some very cheap theatrical observations from that choleric old empire-builder, Mr. Coward. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
No Score Yet What Price Hollywood? (1932) That they are not lovely people does not detract from the fact that they were ingenuously presented to us. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
No Score Yet Strange Interlude (1932) Another Hollywood paradox: a movie which is far better than it has any right to be. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
No Score Yet A Bill of Divorcement (1932) John Barrymore and Miss Hepburn brighten the generally pat and stuffy feeling of the movie and make it entertaining. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
53% Blonde Venus (1932) There is no possible excuse for Blonde Venus, except that it supports the incredibly accurate prediction made in this department some months ago that Marlene Dietrich was due to explode with a loud hollow pop. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
100% Rain (1932) Joan Crawford gives an amiable and shrewd characterization: a performance, in fact, which is not so much deep or tender as it is a facile demonstration of how to work before a camera. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
No Score Yet The Phantom President (1932) It came out a horrible hodge-podge, shackled with narrative scenes and idiotic camera work. Nevertheless it is as funny in spots as any picture you will see in a long while. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
100% Mädchen in Uniform (Girls in Uniform) (Maidens in Uniform) (1931) Director [Leontine] Sagan and her amazing children present a poignant study of adolescence which more than compensates in authenticity for what it lacks in photographic form. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
98% King Kong (1933) These jungle pictures are entertaining, but King Kong is the honey of them all. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
No Score Yet From Hell to Heaven (1933) The horse-race itself is miserably fumbled by Director [Erle C.] Kenton and all the little plots end happily in the nick of time, but it is not a disagreeable job and it has some genuine feeling in it. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
No Score Yet Men Must Fight (1933) A genuinely wretched job. - Vanity Fair EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019