Peter Bowen

Peter Bowen
Peter Bowen's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): OutWeek
Publications: OutWeek

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet Secret Passions (1990) It is not simply that the show is bad... but that it operates on bad faith. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 28, 2020
89% Longtime Companion (1990) The film unfortunately tells its stories too well, ghettoizing them to a narrative that remains oblivious to its own historical groundwork. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
No Score Yet A Strange Love Affair (1985) Formally elegant and brilliantly shot. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
85% Born on the Fourth of July (1989) The film internalizes Cruise's acting career from beef-cake adolescent lo gung-ho patriot within the Film's plot, transforms him into a serious actor by making him at once handicapped and ugly. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2020
88% Maurice (1987) The most stunning example of such a persistently ambiguous vision, which is often about the inability to express or even know one's desire, is Maurice... If the film is slow and confusing, its confusion is inherent in attempts to represent gay sexuality. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2020
80% Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) A terribly beautiful film... [that] makes one at times almost forget the simultaneously banal and and violent lives which the film remembers. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2020
67% True Love (1989) True Love renders this Iocal community at once strangely familiar and and culturally foreign. Under the scrutiny of such an ethnographic gaze, perhaps it is not so bad remaining invisible. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2020
100% Drugstore Cowboy (1989) Drugstore Cowboy offers a deeply moving and profoundly beautiful film. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2020
74% Last Exit to Brooklyn (1989) What makes these stories utterly depressing is not the despair they disclose with routine banality, but the utterly relentless violence the film deploys against any character who even attempts to change his/her fate. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
No Score Yet Macho Dancer (1988) Such economic realities are what produce the film's most profound and enlightening contradictions. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
50% Black Rain (1989) A rather xenophobic tale of American cops fighting Japanese crime. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
86% Kuroi Ame (Black Rain) (1989) What is most poignant in this historic narrative is how profoundly it echoes a crisis currently happening all about us. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
50% The Comfort of Strangers (1991) The film incites a certain paranoia about anyone or any place that is, for lack of a better word, queer. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
77% Poison (1991) Poison internalizes its criminality by playing havoc with the laws of narrative and genre. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
33% Relentless (1989) Rather than provoking a twisted examination of the pathology of the police/criminal mind. Relentless unfortunately settles into a rather bland police buddy story. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
83% Casualties of War (1989) Does Vietnam have a geographical place, a national history, a culture, or a political future? Not really, for as we are reassured at the end of Brian De Palma's military slasher film, Casualties of War, Vietnam was after all only a "bad dream." - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
100% Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1990) While such criticisms are relevant, it is also empowering finally to see a work that recognizes without apology the lives of gay people affected by AIDS connected to others who have experienced firsthand the AIDS crisis. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020
90% Breaking In (1989) Written by John Sayles and directed by the Scottish director, Bill Forsyth, the film works at certain levels by combining Sayles' local American realism with Forsyth's rather quirky sense of humor. - OutWeek EDIT
Read More | Posted May 19, 2020