Pieter-Jan Van Haecke

Pieter-Jan Van Haecke
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
Pieter-Jan Van Haecke is a Belgian critic currently living in Japan. He solely focusing on Japanese cinema and provides in-depth reviews from a unique psychoanalytical perspective.
Publications: Psychocinematography

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
93% Ochazuke no aji (Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice) (1964) With Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice, Ozu delivers an enjoyable exploration of the slow changing marriage-culture in Taishō and Showa Japan. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2021
No Score Yet Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes (2021) Beyond the two infinite minutes proves that one does not necessarily need a big-budget or a creative set-design to craft a compelling sci-fi narrative. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2021
No Score Yet The Promised Land (Rakuen) (2019) What makes Zeze's The Promised Land so pleasing is not so much its composition but its choice to let important questions that propel the narrative forward unanswered. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
No Score Yet Hit Me Anyone One More Time (2019) Hit me anyone One More Time is a truly pleasant film that will please a lot of spectators. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
No Score Yet Giants & Toys (Kyojin to gangu) (1958) The composition of Giants and Toys stands out due its cinematographic dynamism and its pleasing flow. As can be expected, Masamura also utilize his composition to strengthen his thematical explorations. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
72% R100 (2015) Within the stylish composition, these subtle excursions of realism emphasize the very absurdity of what befalls our main character: Takafumi Katayama. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
No Score Yet Sexual Drive (2021) Sexual Drive is an amazing and unconventional narrative that not only explores the eroticism of the oral drive in an enticing and visually pleasing way, but also succeeds to touch, in a lighthearted way, upon the complexity of sexual desire as such. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
No Score Yet Sakura (2020) What makes the narrative great is the fact that it avoids melodrama at all costs and let the emotions naturally flow from the performances as such. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2021
94% Under the Open Sky (Subarashiki Sekai) (2020) A damning look at the vicious and unforgiven nature of the judgmental Other as well as heartwarming emotionally rich exploration of the importance of supportive inter-subjective bonds. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2021
90% True Mothers (Asa ga kuru) (2020) A beautiful and emotionally rich meditation on the complex notion of motherhood that shows that the essential step in becoming mother is the subjective assumption of the signifier 'Mother'. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2021
No Score Yet Voices in the Wind (Kaze no Denwa) (2020) A slow but beautiful meditation on the necessity for the subject to utilize the signifier to start the process of subjectifying the loss/the real that subjectivily derailed them. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2021
No Score Yet Otoko wa tsurai yo: Torajiro gambare! (Tora-san Plays Cupid) (1977) Yamada's narrative is a very enjoyable narrative, offering a balanced mix of comedy, sentimentality, and heartwarming moments - You'll laugh, you'll tear up, you'll feel fuzzy inside. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 14, 2021
75% River's Edge (Ribazu ejji) (2019) Beautifully confronts the spectator with life's questions: how should we position ourselves in respect to life and death and how to integrate sexuality in our subjective existence. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 13, 2021
82% Wet Woman in the Wind (Kaze ni nureta onna) (2017) Shiota Akihito's narrative shows (...) that only women can go beyond (...) manly silliness and that, in a battle of eroticism, only women can be the victor." - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2021
67% Romance Doll (2020) Yu Aoi and Issey Takahashi do not evade their responsibility and succeed in delivering one of the most moving relational metamorphoses of recent years. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2021
100% Naked Youth (Seishun zankoku monogatari) (A Story of the Cruelties of Youth) (1960) With his narrative, Oshima (prophetically) confronts us that the fact that what destroys idealism is nothing but a forced societal call to enjoy and to consume. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2021
75% A Bride for Rip Van Winkle (Rippu van winkuru no hanayome) (2017) Iwai expertly shows that, while the reliance on the imaginary problematizes genuine human connection, the field of the imaginary is also necessary to be able to form any social bond whatsoever. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2021
83% Koshikei (Death by Hanging) (1968) Oshima's narrative is a true classic of political driven cinema that, perhaps contrary to one's expectations, remains as relevant today as it was in the past. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2021
100% Ainu Mosir (2020) Fukagawa's narrative might lack some emotionality, but he successfully confronts the spectator with an enduring problem marking modernity: the problem of accepting the Otherness of the bi-cultured other. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2021
60% Life: Untitled (2019) Yamada's narrative, which culminates in a powerful finale, forces the spectator to face the failure of society and its male subjects to value the very subjectivity of women. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2021
No Score Yet Howling Village (Inunaki Mura) (2021) Shimizu proves with his latest horror-narrative that one does not need to reinvent the genre to be able to deliver a film that satisfies spectators seeking thrills and scares. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2021
No Score Yet Cenote (Ts'ono'ot) (2019) A beautiful experimental documentary exploring the position of life and death within the Mayan society of the past and the current society. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2021
100% Gemini (Sôseiji) (1999) A fabulous and unique romance horror narrative that succeeds in uncovering the often-forgotten truth that all speaking beings are driven by a desire to be loved/desire to love. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2021
90% Creepy (Kuripi: Itsuwari no rinjin) (2016) Kurosawa shows, in masterful way, that creepiness lurks at the surface of society, just behind the façade of daily life, hidden in plain sight. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2020
No Score Yet Herutâ sukerutâ (Helter Skelter) (2012) A must-see (that reveals) Mika Ninagawa's talent to realize her vision in a masterly way. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 15, 2020
100% The Tale of the Princess Kaguya (2014) In every aspect of the narrative, we feel the work of an exceptional craftsman. A phenomenal masterpiece that we should accept and give, cradled in own palms, to our friends and family. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2020
100% Love & Peace (2015) This romantic, musical, comedy mixed with some kaiju goodness is as absurd as it gets, but it hits all the right emotional notes. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 14, 2020
71% Tokyo Vampire Hotel (2017) Sion Sono's poetry questions enjoyment and its function within contemporary Japanese society with ultra-violent precision. This is, in other words, Sion Sono at its finest. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2020
No Score Yet Shinjuku Swan (2015) The likeability of Gou Ayano as Tatsuhiko and the surprisingly dense narrative ensures that Sion Sono's 'Shinjuku Swan' is better than your average manga-adaptation. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2020
No Score Yet Tokyo Night Sky Is Always the Densest Shade of Blue (Yozora wa itsudemo saikô mitsudo no aoiro da) (2017) Even if the narrative is poetically inconsistent on a cinematographical level, there is still a lot to like about the lyricism of speech and the eloquence by which two lost souls are able to find each other as subject. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2020
No Score Yet Being Natural (2019) The very boldness of Nagayama to let the seemingly nonsensical derail the ordinary struggle of a man - a derailing that will long linger in your mind after the credits faded - has to be applauded. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Tourism (2018) This is not Daisuke Miyazaki at his finest. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
100% Destruction Babies (Disutorakushon beibîzu) (2016) Yes, the film is provocative, but not only due to its framing of violence. The true provocation lies in its rather hidden critique of a society struggling with enjoyment and authority. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Marriage Hunting Beauty (Bijin Ga Konkatsu Shite) (2019) The beautiful and lighthearted framing of Takako's subjective reality ultimately fails to turn the narrative's central message in the moving resolution it should have been. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Chrysanthemum and the Guillotine (2018) With his narrative, Zeze movingly reveals that the ground for true revolution should be love and its goal the realization of that place where a woman can realize her agency as subject. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Dare to Stop Us (2018) The true moving beauty of this narrative is found in the unearthing of the lingering enigma (i.e. female sexuality/female sexuation) that underpins pink-eiga as a genre and Wakamatsu's oeuvre in particular. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
100% The Blood of Wolves (Korou no chi) (2018) While those expecting a pure Yakuza drama might be disappointed, those who give Blood of Wolves a chance are in for one of the best and most entertaining Yakuza/police thrillers in years. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Fly Me to the Saitama (Tonde Saitama) (2019) Takeuchi succeeds in turning the contradictions, anachronisms, and the visually radicalized prejudices into a hilarious, witty adventure that touches upon the importance of being proud of one's home prefecture. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
75% Tezuka's Barbara (2019) This moody narrative beautifully shows that addictive love serves nothing but the egoistic needs of the addicted subject - a love that consumes the subject if the love-object is unable to be consummated. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Mimicry Freaks (2019) It is because the spectator is denied to get a full grasp on the narrative, that the splatter and the visual horror is able to unsettle the spectator in such a pleasing way. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet 12 Suicidal Teens (2019) A decent mystery narrative that sadly fails to make its important message about inter-subjective connections powerful enough for the spectator. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Koi no uzu (The Vortex of Love) (2013) An extraordinary narrative that offers one of the most dense and rich explorations of the complexity of the relational dynamics between the sexes. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet JESUS (2020) Okuyama's evocation of the irreducible tension that exists between praying and the lack of results enables him to craft a touching tale of subjective growth and emancipation from religion. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2020
No Score Yet Yokomichi yonosuke (A Story of Yonosuke) (2013) A magnificent and unforgettable encounter not only with Yonosuke, but also with the importance of the encounter as such and the way by which true encounters affect the subject. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2020
96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) Kore-eda vividly explores the complexity of familial relations while touching gently upon the fundamental importance of treasuring small moments of happiness. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2020
90% Chiwawa (Chiwawa-chan) (2019) With his precise cinematographical hand, Ninomiya confronts the spectator with an unpleasant truth about contemporary relationships: the lack of interest in the other as Other. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2020
No Score Yet Kakegurui: The Movie (2019) A narrative that will not only please long-time fans of the series, but also convert many newcomers into kakegurui's enthusiasts. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2020
40% Wotakoi: Love Is Hard for Otaku (2020) Fukada offers comical moments, pleasing musical sequences, and endearing romantic segments but ultimately fails to deliver the emotional powerful moment the narrative needs. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2020
77% Monster Seafood Wars (2020) A fun silly Kaiju narrative that explores the centrality of the oral drive in the subject's enjoyment as well as the causal role human desire plays in the birth of disasters. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2020
53% Futatsume no mado (Still the Water) (2014) Given the thoughtfulness that went into framing the formative story of Kaito and Kyoko, it's all the more sad to see the narrative lack any real emotional repercussions. - Psychocinematography EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2020