Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
79% CSA: The Confederate States of America (2005) "C.S.A." tells a counter-story of how slavery survives to the present day-and it uses traces of contemporary pop culture to show that the notion isn't really even such a stretch.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
90% John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Despite the long takes and the wide angles, the traumatic violence looks like expertly realized C.G.I., combined with elaborately sampled stunt work.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
9% Fifty Shades Darker (2017) Foley's direction could serve as Exhibit A in the story of the demise of the mid-range drama: it didn't die a natural death but was killed off by the sort of reductive realism that's on display in "Fifty Shades Darker."‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
60% Paraguayan Hammock (2006) Encina's film, balanced exquisitely between the concrete and the abstract, between the specific and the absolute, is a quietly devastating indictment of the eternal waste of youth as cannon fodder in this and all wars.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
100% A New Leaf (1971) Reveals the essence of marital love more brutally than many confrontational melodramas.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
No Score Yet Man's Castle (1933) Filming the streetwise action and the colorful, caustic language from Jo Swerling's script, the director, Frank Borzage, finds sanctified tenderness in the poignant absurdities and grubby brutalities of gutter-level striving.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
100% Kanal (Canal) (They Loved Life) (1961) The film turns combat-film clichés upside down.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
25% The Comedian (2017) The plot is forced and flimsy, the characters are thinly conceived, and the comic writing is often cringeworthy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
No Score Yet The Bowery (1933) The casual and constant violence, the drunkenness and gambling, the punished, unkempt bodies, and the mercurial swings between gutter and glory make Walsh's raw, raunchy film the authentic "Gangs of New York."‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
87% Warnung vor einer Heiligen Nutte (Beware of a Holy Whore) (1971) This is how the cinema looked, in 1971, to the twenty-six-year-old director Rainer Werner Fassbinder, who already had ten feature films under his belt.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
100% Columbus (2017) "Columbus" is one of the rare films in which nerdy intelligence-knowledge without experience-comes off without neurosis, comedic awkwardness, or vengeance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
80% Beach Rats (2017) "Beach Rats," a boldly irreconcilable drama, shows a character locating ugliness and horror within himself.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
65% Golden Exits (2017) "Golden Exits" is Brooklyn Bergman, a drama of death pushing from behind and despair looming ahead.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
75% Split (2017) The movie's simultaneous evocation of both the depravity at work beneath society's deceptive surfaces and the inadequacy of the liberal technocratic order to defend against that depravity is the secret to its success.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
100% Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble (We Won't Grow Old Together) (1972) Pialat captures the push-and-pull of their impossible relationship with pugnacious images and abrupt editing.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
100% Ana-ta-han (Anatahan) (1954) Sternberg slashes the screen with Expressionist tangles of foliage and menacing shadows of rough-hewn latticework.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
82% The Founder (2017) Its omissions and elisions are the result not of natural narrative contours but of open choices, gaping holes, psychological wounds that a filmmaker displays all the more via the elaborate efforts at concealment ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
100% Home from the Hill (1960) Its rhetoric may be laconic and folksy, but its fury and its nobility seem distilled from Shakespeare.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
80% Patriots Day (2017) "Patriots Day" touches on vast phenomena, looking at an event that packs a huge amount of modern mental space in its crisp narrative confines. That's why its blandly reductive simplicity is all the more unfortunate.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
89% 20th Century Women (2017) Mills's world is certainly not devoid of pain, but it's leached of bitterness, leached of conflict, leached of aggression, leached of hostility; the pain and the trauma are leached of consequence.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
87% A Monster Calls (2017) The movie delivers its meaning repeatedly to make sure that no one misses the point; its lessons, rendered even more explicitly than the ones in Conor's classroom, are missing only the chalkboard and pointer.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
No Score Yet Scarred Hearts (2016) The medical regimen provides a background for the slow-motion whirl of young intellectuals, politicians, and socialites who turn the hospital into a microcosm of European diseases of the soul.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2017
44% Modesty Blaise (1966) Losey captures with comedy the same chill of modernity beneath the Mediterranean sun that Antonioni captures with melodrama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2017
91% The Son of Joseph (Le fils de Joseph) (2017) The passionate heart of the action, Vincent's quest for emotional connection, involves his radical rejection of norms and proprieties and sparks the timeless fury of revolt; it's as thrilling as it is ingenious.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2017
100% Les Nuits de la pleine lune (Full Moon in Paris) (1984) With a graceful round of self-deceptions and mistaken identities, exquisite rationalizations and fortuitous accidents, Rohmer pierces the glossy veneer of the social scene and the dignified realm of art to reveal the sexual fury that they embody.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2017
96% Paterson (2016) "Paterson" is simultaneously a paean to art and a tribute to working men-long-suffering men who toil in thankless isolation on repetitive jobs, carrying family responsibilities on their shoulders.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2017
83% Silence (2017) "Silence" is only a near-great film, one in which the very power of its subject-and of Scorsese's devotion to it-appears largely to restrain his distinctive artistry.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2017
98% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) Peck's references to current events reveal Baldwin's view of history and his prophetic visions to be painfully accurate.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 2, 2017
97% Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016) Gentle and appealing performances can't rescue this facile and cloying comedy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 29, 2016
93% Toni Erdmann (2016) There isn't a question in any of the filming; Ade's sense of representation is one of confident approximations. In sticking to a familiarly unquestioned sense of cinematic reality, she empties it of psychological reality; it's a movie with no inner life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
92% Hidden Figures (2017) A crucial episode of the nineteen-sixties, centered on both the space race and the civil-rights struggle, comes to light in this energetic and impassioned drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2016
12% Collateral Beauty (2016) The failure of "Collateral Beauty" is all the more grievous for the waste of its superb actors.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2016
No Score Yet The Dumb Girl Of Portici (2012) Weber's bold and imaginative direction has its own independent artistic identity, in which the composition of images for and with Pavlova is only one part.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2016
85% Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) Rogue One isn't so much a movie as a feature-length promotional film for itself; it's a movie that is still waiting to be made.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 13, 2016
93% La La Land (2016) The one thing that Chazelle seems to have little interest in is life. He turns Mia into an absolute cipher, giving her nothing whatsoever to talk about.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2016
93% Fences (2016) Under Washington's earnest but plain direction, scenes of loose-limbed riffing ... soar above the drama's conspicuous mechanisms and symbolism.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2016
90% The Quiet Man (1952) As much an anthropological adventure as a romantic rhapsody.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2016
61% Allied (2016) Zemeckis's formidably staunch and precise technique, itself a nostalgic vestige of classic Hollywood movies, seals up the movie's joints and keeps the air of life out; it's a suffocated, lifeless adventure.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2016
100% Things to Come (L'avenir) (2016) Huppert feasts on the turmoil beneath Nathalie's composed surfaces, the emotional force of the philosopher's dialectical intelligence.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 28, 2016
100% Canyon Passage (1946) Avoiding history and politics, Tourneur serves up, in a dreamlike Technicolor glow, a pastoral film noir.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 28, 2016
96% Manchester by the Sea (2016) It's less a movie of aesthetics than of synesthesia, transmitting an unbearable burden of inner coldness and emptiness by means of warmhearted wonder.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 25, 2016
89% Elle (2016) It doesn't exist except as a pile of tropes and clichés that have neither a material nor a symbolic identity but solely a string of simplistic causes and programmed responses.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2016
55% Rules Don't Apply (2016) A wildly scattershot comedy filled with bright moments that never cohere.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2016
96% The Love Witch (2016) The film pulsates with furious creative energy, sparking excitement and amazement by way of its decorative twists, intellectual provocations, and astounding humor.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
94% Hunter Gatherer (2016) Locy infuses the film with empathy and wit, and his grandly bittersweet imagination pulls the story toward tragedy, but he also plays loosely with stereotypes better left behind.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
95% The Edge of Seventeen (2016) As written and directed by Kelly Fremon Craig, the characters don't exist beyond their few foregrounded traits, and the action unspools mainly in clattery witticisms that take the place of substantial dialogue.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
96% Daughters of the Dust (1991) Dash's boldly imaginative, ecstatically visionary drama ... is one of the best of all American independent films; she turns one family's experience of the Great Migration into a vast mythopoetic adventure.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
70% Uncle Kent 2 (2016) Despite the thin story and Rohal's merely efficient direction, the effort suggests bold new prospects in independent filmmaking.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
91% Royal Wedding (1951) Almost wall-to-wall dancing, with a vengeance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
86% Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Gibson has made a movie that's nearly pathological in its love of violence-but he nonetheless counterbalances its amoral pleasures with an understanding of the psychological devastation that war wreaks.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2016