Richard BrodyMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Scarred Hearts (2016) The medical regimen provides a background for the slow-motion whirl of young intellectuals, politicians, and socialites who turn the hospital into a microcosm of European diseases of the soul. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 16, 2017
44% Modesty Blaise (1966) Losey captures with comedy the same chill of modernity beneath the Mediterranean sun that Antonioni captures with melodrama. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 16, 2017
90% The Son of Joseph (Le fils de Joseph) (2017) The passionate heart of the action, Vincent's quest for emotional connection, involves his radical rejection of norms and proprieties and sparks the timeless fury of revolt; it's as thrilling as it is ingenious. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 9, 2017
100% Les Nuits de la pleine lune (Full Moon in Paris) (1984) With a graceful round of self-deceptions and mistaken identities, exquisite rationalizations and fortuitous accidents, Rohmer pierces the glossy veneer of the social scene and the dignified realm of art to reveal the sexual fury that they embody. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 9, 2017
96% Paterson (2016) "Paterson" is simultaneously a paean to art and a tribute to working men-long-suffering men who toil in thankless isolation on repetitive jobs, carrying family responsibilities on their shoulders. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 2, 2017
84% Silence (2017) "Silence" is only a near-great film, one in which the very power of its subject-and of Scorsese's devotion to it-appears largely to restrain his distinctive artistry. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 2, 2017
96% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) Peck's references to current events reveal Baldwin's view of history and his prophetic visions to be painfully accurate. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Jan 2, 2017
97% Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016) Gentle and appealing performances can't rescue this facile and cloying comedy. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 29, 2016
92% Toni Erdmann (2016) There isn't a question in any of the filming; Ade's sense of representation is one of confident approximations. In sticking to a familiarly unquestioned sense of cinematic reality, she empties it of psychological reality; it's a movie with no inner life. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 27, 2016
92% Hidden Figures (2017) A crucial episode of the nineteen-sixties, centered on both the space race and the civil-rights struggle, comes to light in this energetic and impassioned drama. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 19, 2016
12% Collateral Beauty (2016) The failure of "Collateral Beauty" is all the more grievous for the waste of its superb actors. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 18, 2016
No Score Yet The Dumb Girl Of Portici (2012) Weber's bold and imaginative direction has its own independent artistic identity, in which the composition of images for and with Pavlova is only one part. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 18, 2016
85% Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) Rogue One isn't so much a movie as a feature-length promotional film for itself; it's a movie that is still waiting to be made. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 13, 2016
93% La La Land (2016) The one thing that Chazelle seems to have little interest in is life. He turns Mia into an absolute cipher, giving her nothing whatsoever to talk about. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 12, 2016
95% Fences (2016) Under Washington's earnest but plain direction, scenes of loose-limbed riffing ... soar above the drama's conspicuous mechanisms and symbolism. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 12, 2016
90% The Quiet Man (1952) As much an anthropological adventure as a romantic rhapsody. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 5, 2016
61% Allied (2016) Zemeckis's formidably staunch and precise technique, itself a nostalgic vestige of classic Hollywood movies, seals up the movie's joints and keeps the air of life out; it's a suffocated, lifeless adventure. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Dec 1, 2016
100% Things to Come (L'avenir) (2016) Huppert feasts on the turmoil beneath Nathalie's composed surfaces, the emotional force of the philosopher's dialectical intelligence. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 28, 2016
100% Canyon Passage (1946) Avoiding history and politics, Tourneur serves up, in a dreamlike Technicolor glow, a pastoral film noir. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 28, 2016
96% Manchester by the Sea (2016) It's less a movie of aesthetics than of synesthesia, transmitting an unbearable burden of inner coldness and emptiness by means of warmhearted wonder. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 25, 2016
88% Elle (2016) It doesn't exist except as a pile of tropes and clichés that have neither a material nor a symbolic identity but solely a string of simplistic causes and programmed responses. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 21, 2016
54% Rules Don't Apply (2016) A wildly scattershot comedy filled with bright moments that never cohere. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 21, 2016
95% The Love Witch (2016) The film pulsates with furious creative energy, sparking excitement and amazement by way of its decorative twists, intellectual provocations, and astounding humor. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
94% Hunter Gatherer (2016) Locy infuses the film with empathy and wit, and his grandly bittersweet imagination pulls the story toward tragedy, but he also plays loosely with stereotypes better left behind. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
95% The Edge of Seventeen (2016) As written and directed by Kelly Fremon Craig, the characters don't exist beyond their few foregrounded traits, and the action unspools mainly in clattery witticisms that take the place of substantial dialogue. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
96% Daughters of the Dust (1991) Dash's boldly imaginative, ecstatically visionary drama ... is one of the best of all American independent films; she turns one family's experience of the Great Migration into a vast mythopoetic adventure. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
70% Uncle Kent 2 (2016) Despite the thin story and Rohal's merely efficient direction, the effort suggests bold new prospects in independent filmmaking. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
91% Royal Wedding (1951) Almost wall-to-wall dancing, with a vengeance. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 14, 2016
86% Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Gibson has made a movie that's nearly pathological in its love of violence-but he nonetheless counterbalances its amoral pleasures with an understanding of the psychological devastation that war wreaks. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 7, 2016
43% Dog Eat Dog (2016) Schrader thrusts the amoral ugliness onto the screen in puckishly cold compositions suffused with screechingly acidulous colors. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 7, 2016
90% Doctor Strange (2016) Lives up to its title, in mostly good ways. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Nov 7, 2016
100% Jazz on a Summer's Day (1960) Several of the performances are among the treasures of filmed music; all of them, whatever their musical merit, are filmed with a rare artistry, a rare attention to making images of music that are themselves musical. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 27, 2016
27% Harlem Nights (1989) The movie is a whirlingly divergent romp, blending serious violence with outrageous comedy, but it has the feel of oral history, of lives and times rescued from oblivion. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 27, 2016
100% Open City (1946) Handheld cameras tremble with the urgency of open wounds and violent emotion in Roberto Rossellini's 1945 drama of the Italian resistance to the capital's occupation by Nazi Germany. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 26, 2016
19% Keeping Up With The Joneses (2016) The script sets up the action part of the movie with an interminably laborious and close-fitting literalness that hardly lets any of the actors breathe. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 24, 2016
85% Christine (2016) The narrow scope and narrow determinism of the action in "Christine" is unfortunately matched by the narrow-albeit immensely skillful and committed-acting that Campos elicits from Hall. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 24, 2016
55% Michael Moore In TrumpLand (2016) Within the carnivalesque atmosphere and high-spirited revelry of Moore's show, there's a master of political rhetoric at work, and he devotes that mastery to a high patriotic calling. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 24, 2016
98% Moonlight (2016) Jenkins burrows deep into his characters' pain-seared memories, creating ferociously restrained performances and confrontational yet tender images that seem wrenched from his very core. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 24, 2016
93% Fire at Sea (Fuocoammare) (2016) Rosi films the migrants empathetically but sentimentally; he depicts helicopters and ships with bombastic grandeur. What's more, half the movie has nothing to do with migrants ... ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 24, 2016
97% Aquarius (2016) Despite Sonia Braga's fierce performance as a woman of unbreakable determination and proud refinement, this drama by the Brazilian director Kleber Mendonça Filho quickly lapses into sentimental attitudinizing. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 24, 2016
14% Fever Pitch (1985) Brooks films the action in sharply defined images with spare and aggressive angles, conjuring the inner howls of conflicting desires tearing Steve and the sordidly glossy milieu apart during even the simplest of events. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 17, 2016
23% American Pastoral (2016) McGregor catches the elegiac grandeur of Philip Roth's 1997 novel but filters out its bitter irony, historical sweep, and psychological complexity. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 17, 2016
No Score Yet Adieu Philippine (1963) Rozier revels in the new era of rock music and Club Med, and his wondrous images raise the delicate rituals of adolescent courtship to a poignant comic grandeur. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 17, 2016
51% The Accountant (2016) Piles up plotlines like an overbuilt house of cards that comes crashing down at the first well-earned guffaw of ridicule. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 17, 2016
72% The Birth of a Nation (2016) A seriously damaged and inadequate movie ... its defects reveal traits of character-arrogance, vanity, and self-importance-that exert an unfortunately strong influence on Parker's directorial choices. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2016
100% Tower (2016) Exhorted at the time to put the troubles behind them and discouraged from speaking about their experiences, many of the subjects approach Maitland's interviews as long-overdue, albeit pain-filled, acts of personal liberation. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2016
95% Little Sister (2016) With its blend of terrifyingly intense family bonds and the howling furies of the world outside, this is a great American political film. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2016
90% Certain Women (2016) The three sections of Kelly Reichardt's new film-set in Montana and adapted from stories by Maile Meloy-are consistent in their restrained tone but divergent in their impact. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 10, 2016
91% I Called Him Morgan (2016) Collin's film brings out these stories with a wealth of details energized by the experiences and the insights of his interview subjects as well as an engaging range of archival images and clips. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 5, 2016
78% American Honey (2016) The movie's empathetic power moves backward-it arises in retrospect and in the abstract, checking off its truthful and perceptive list of afflictions and responses. ‐ New Yorker
Posted Oct 5, 2016