Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
15% Transformers: The Last Knight (2017) All the best moments in the movie-pure images, devoid of symbol and, for that matter, nearly empty of sense-go by too fast, are held too briefly, are developed too little.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
91% Mauvais Sang (2013) A masterpiece of ecstatic cinema from 1986, directed by Leos Carax at the age of twenty-five.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
43% The Bad Batch (2017) Amirpour ... delivers this imaginative tale as a simplistic allegory of the haves and the have-nots; she ruefully delights in the wasteland's postindustrial wreckage while leaving characters' thoughts and motives blank.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
No Score Yet Angel (1937) Lubitsch sees the round of coincidences as a game of cruel destiny, albeit one that's played on the world stage against a backdrop of looming war.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
100% Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) In "Dawson City," Morrison offers a fiercely precise and discerning look at movies themselves as embodiments of history.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
92% Wonder Woman (2017) "Wonder Woman" is a superhero movie, and it fulfills the heroic and mythic demands of that genre, but it's also an entry in the genre of wisdom literature that shares hard-won insights and long-pondered paradoxes of the past with a sincere intimacy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
88% Monkey Business (1952) A summit of comic invention.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
55% War Machine (2017) The absolute absence of intimacy, of psychology, of characters' self-revelation in thought and desire, is a failure of form and style as much as of content.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2017
86% It Comes At Night (2017) This modest science-fiction thriller brings the hands-on vigor of independent filmmaking to a high-concept premise, but the results are insubstantial and impersonal.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2017
No Score Yet Johanna D'Arc of Mongolia (Joan of Arc of Mongolia) (1989) For all its outwardly probing observation and decorative delights, the movie concludes with an abstract touch that's as breathtaking as any of its sights and sounds.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
71% Alien: Covenant (2017) In space, no one can hear you laugh.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
67% Lions Love (1969) More than a time capsule of events and moods-it's a living aesthetic model for revolutionary times.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
82% The Woman Who Left (Ang babaeng humayo) (2017) The pace is an anti-ornamental affectation that artificially distends an hour's worth of action.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
87% Hermia & Helena (2017) Piñeiro conjures a cogently realistic yet gloriously imaginative vision of youthful ardor in love and art alike.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
62% An Affair to Remember (1957) McCarey plays the shipboard courtship for generous and tender laughs-the wryly staged first kiss is one of the sweetest in all cinema-but the comedy that follows on dry land is mostly inadvertent.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
88% Icaros: A Vision (2017) The hallucinatory power of ayahuasca and the incantatory lure of rituals fuse with existential dread in this darkly hypnotic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
No Score Yet Bless Their Little Hearts (2008) Woodberry crafts a passionately pensive realism-nearly every scene of action is matched by a long one in which one character or another, in observant repose, looks back and sees their self reflected in society's mirror.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
36% Snatched (2017) Schumer and Hawn go dutifully through the film's paces, animating the movie with their mere presence while the best elements of their art stay in the closet for next time.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 12, 2017
85% The Lovers (2017) The movie exhausts itself in its conception and sits inert on the screen like an undigested mass of script pages.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
74% A Woman's Life (Une vie) (2017) Brizé pays more attention to the tasteful costumes and the alluring settings than to the drama or the images.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
95% Léon Morin, Prêtre (Leon Morin, Priest) (The Forgiven Sinner) (1961) Melville films the religious dialectics with remarkable but dispassionate skill, and he uses the story of Barny and Morin to skew the postwar political context ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
71% Taboo (2000) A spare and cruel drama about sex and violence within the ranks of the samurai.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
88% Close-up (Nema-ye Nazdik) (1999) In Kiarostami's furiously clear view, religious dogma suppresses the eye's observations through the dictate of the word; his calmly unwavering images, with their wry humor and generous sympathy, have the force of a steadfast resistance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
No Score Yet Bush Mama (1979) Gerima's great achievement is to compose a cinematic style that's simultaneously observational and subjective, dramatic and internalized.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 1, 2017
80% Casting JonBenét (2017) "Casting JonBenet," is in many ways a deeply unsatisfying, even infuriating film, but I wouldn't want not to have seen it.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 1, 2017
67% Thirst Street (2017) Burdge infuses her rigidly and scantly defined role with tremulous vulnerability, and Silver, aided by the splashy palette of Sean Price Williams's cinematography, evokes derangement with a sardonic wink.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
No Score Yet Hospital (1970) Reveals the decisive impact of the art and science of medicine-and the ways of government-on the lives of ordinary people.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2017
28% Sandy Wexler (2017) There's no way to recommend it, yet I wouldn't ask for my two hours back (though I do wish that they could have been sped up somewhat).‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
88% The Lost City of Z (2017) With its bluff, romantic resuscitation of the cinema's classic adventure-tale genre and tone, it's perhaps Gray's most radical attempt at abstraction and displacement.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
67% Free Fire (2017) A smug knockoff of Quentin Tarantino's brand of ironic violence, at several degenerations' remove.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
80% Colossal (2017) At its best, it achieves a rare synthesis of virtues that is a primal value of the cinema: it revels in the power of cinematic artifice to tell a story that confronts big questions about real life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
No Score Yet Welfare (1975) The psychology of poverty has rarely been so well depicted, along with the inadequacy of the bureaucracy itself: the ostensible objectivity of the law rests on the subjective judgments, even the good will, of the caseworkers.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
89% Norman (Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer) (2017) Cedar plays Norman's story for tragedy but never develops his inner identity, his history, or his ideals; the protagonist and his drama remain anecdotal and superficial.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
67% Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary (2017) A dully conventional film about a brilliantly unconventional musician.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
95% L'Avventura (1960) Rightly considered to be a cinematic landmark.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2017
92% Win It All (2017) Swanberg-aided greatly by Johnson's vigorous performance-makes the gambler's panic-stricken silence all the more agonizing, balancing the warm veneer of intimate normalcy with the inner chill of secrets and lies.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
100% The Seduction of Joe Tynan (1979) Schatzberg directs the film with a sleek yet relaxed precision that mirrors Joe's own breezy confidence.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
95% Prevenge (2017) If metaphors were movies, Alice Lowe's new film would be a masterwork. Instead, it's just smart fun-as well as a promising début.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
57% i hate myself :) (2017) Despite some memorably painful moments and underlying artistic urgency, the film's implications remain unprocessed and unquestioned.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
74% The Death of Louis XIV (La mort de Louis XIV) (2017) Serra's ideas are serious but simple, and his movie seems to illustrate them in slow motion.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
65% Carrie Pilby (2017) A core of substance and a fine cast are squandered in the relentless hard-sell perkiness of this mild comic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
67% Life (2017) The movie reduces its fear factor to simple suspense that's not insignificant but is pretty insubstantial.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
96% The Mother and the Whore (La Maman et la putain) (1973) Eustache, in his tender and passionate depiction of their romantic roundelay, delivers nothing less than a comprehensive vision of France's post-1968 revolution-and it's a ferociously conservative view.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
No Score Yet La Naissance De L'amour (The Birth of Love) (2008) Against a media backdrop of the Gulf War and its human cost, Garrel, for all his intense personal sympathy for the artists' emotional turbulence, presents its price as well.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) Kore-eda looks sensitively at the deep roots of unquenched anguish, but he constructs the characters too neatly and the situations too precisely for the drama to seem like anything but a well-meaning lesson.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2017
44% Song to Song (2017) Malick ... displays a conspicuously painterly boldness, a sort of cinematic Impressionism that locates an indelible force of light and detail in the stuff of daily life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
79% Personal Shopper (2017) The problem of Stewart's performance is indicative of Assayas's broader weaknesses as a director. In "Personal Shopper," his subject is intimacy and sensuality, but the film offers neither.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
100% Rat Film (2016) Anthony discovers a close correlation between the prevalence of a wide range of present-day afflictions and the predominantly black neighborhoods established a century ago-including, of course, the unrelieved prevalence of rats.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017
61% Slack Bay (Ma loute) (2017) "Slack Bay" teems with the eventfulness of a serial compressed into a two-hour movie, and its sense of distillation emerges in the wide range of performance styles that Dumont elicits-and the physical precision that marks each of them.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017
100% Strong Island (2017) Ford is more than a witness-he is a crucial participant in the events of the film, and its elements of pain and guilt are reflected in his grief-stricken, self-interrogating aesthetic.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2017