Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
90% The Rape Of Recy Taylor (2017) Essential viewing, not least for its emphasis on the crucial role of women in the civil-rights movement ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2017
93% Bigger Than Life (1956) Mason's gift for cold-eyed madness is heightened by Ray's exuberantly lurid approach.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2017
91% Story of a Love Affair (Cronaca di un amore) (1950) Antonioni captures their passion with architectural precision; he presses his lovers into hard-edged corporate and domestic spaces by way of graphically etched, high-contrast camerawork ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2017
90% I, Tonya (2017) Gillespie's empathy is mixed with condescension; much of the movie's bluff comedy mocks the tone and the actions of Tonya and her milieu.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2017
94% The Disaster Artist (2017) The comedy, for all its scenes of giddy wonder, never gets past Tommy's mask of mystery; avoiding speculation and investigation, it stays on the surface of his public and private shtick, leaving little more than a trail of amusing anecdotes.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2017
91% The Other Side of Hope (Toivon tuolla puolen) (2017) Running gags about oddball twists in the restaurant business serve little purpose but don't detract from the movie's essential quasi-documentary power.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
No Score Yet Dusty and Sweets McGee (1971) Mutrux captures with a sharp, furtive eye the crevices of public life that the drug trade fills ... and scenes of Mephistophelian kingpins show that the moral rot of drugs runs through all levels of society.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
48% Porto (2017) [A] quietly bombastic and emotionally oblivious romantic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
37% I Love You, Daddy (2017) Louis C.K. doesn't approach his subject substantially; rather, he uses China's coming-of-age story as a wedge to endorse, with an obliviously unconditional smugness, the merits of relationships between older men and teen-age girls.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
100% The Cool World (1964) Clarke's images endow the characters' energies with a sculptural grandeur and embrace street life with a keenly attentive, unsentimental avidity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
No Score Yet Illusions (1982) Dash blends intimate portraiture with echoing reflections and multiple exposures that capture Hollywood's harrowing game of multiple and hidden identities.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
93% On the Beach at Night Alone (Bamui haebyun-eoseo honja) (2017) There's a dark romanticism powering Hong Sang-soo's furious, tautly controlled, yet coolly comedic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
97% Mudbound (2017) Rees uses voice-overs to bring the many characters to life, but the text is thin; the movie's exposition is needlessly slow and stepwise, and the drama, though affecting, is literal and oversimplified.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
92% Wait for Your Laugh (2017) [Jason] Wise's film is more than a tribute to her-it's a new setting within which, telling the story of her life, she performs again.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
86% Regular Lovers (2005) Garrel gives an original artistic form to his rueful view of his own youthful illusions.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
54% LBJ (2017) The political intricacies and hearty bluster of Rob Reiner's drama, about Lyndon Baines Johnson's accidental Presidency, help to overcome its wax-museum eeriness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
99% Lady Bird (2017) As writer and director, Greta Gerwig infuses this comedic coming-of-age drama with verbal virtuosity, gestural idiosyncrasy, and emotional vitality.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
43% Don't Come Knocking (2006) Despite the film's false notes, its balladlike moods ring true.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
89% Only the Brave (2017) Though the movie, based on an article in GQ, by Sean Flynn, offers fascinating insights into the practical exertions and bureaucratic complications of firefighting, it places much greater emphasis on the protagonists' personal lives.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
87% Novitiate (2017) Betts ... undercuts the characters' passion and transcendent devotion with audiovisual commonplaces, familiar acting styles, and a merely anecdotal narrative.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
93% Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold (2017) The result, though loving and celebratory, is closer to an official portrait than an illuminating biography.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
96% Félicité (2017) The movie is a virtual documentary of city sights and moods, and also a bitter exposé of a country without a social safety net.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
85% Sylvio (2017) Bernardi is an actor of genius; his Janus-faced pantomime, as Sylvio struggles voicelessly for a place among human chatterboxes, channels the infinite grace of the great silent-film comedians.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2017
87% Professor Marston & The Wonder Women (2017) The writer and director Angela Robinson illuminates an extraordinary corner of pop-culture history with a bland and textureless drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2017
83% Marshall (2017) The movie urgently dramatizes the threat of racist violence that poisons personal relationships and judicial proceedings alike.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2017
No Score Yet Talking to Strangers (1988) The cinematic art of Talking to Strangers reminds me of that of Max Ophüls, whose lyrically vertiginous mastery of the track and the crane is also rhapsodic, also bittersweet-but profoundly, scathingly worldly.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
No Score Yet L'enfant secret (1982) Catches the fleeting intimacies of threadbare romance while reaching for the pictorial power of silent spectacles-which it occasionally achieves.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
100% Faces Places (Visages, villages) (2017) Anecdote and history converge wondrously and insightfully in this playful yet painstaking collaboration between the octogenarian director Agnès Varda and the thirtysomething photographer and muralist JR.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
98% Lucky (2017) The late Harry Dean Stanton, in one of his last roles, infuses the slightest gesture and inflection with the weight of grave experience, but this maudlin drama mainly renders his grit and wisdom wholesome and cute.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
No Score Yet Gavagai (2016) It's an astonishment, realized with a technique and a touch that are unique in the current cinema.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
No Score Yet Hissein Habré, a Chadian Tragedy (2016) [An] intimate, experiential, and impassioned documentary.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
88% First They Killed My Father (2017) The Khmer Rouge's repressions and exactions are depicted fearsomely, but many of Jolie's images are postcard-pretty, and their emotional range depends mainly upon the child actors' tremulous and steadfast expressions.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
89% The Firemen's Ball (1968) In 1967, the year before Soviet tanks rampaged through Czechoslovakia, the Czech director Milos Forman subtly, scathingly used the premise of a quaint provincial party to mock the Party.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
100% Cockfighter (1974) Hellman embraces, with visual nuance, a world of back roads and forests, grim motels and ramshackle arenas, and he approaches the intricacies of the subculture ... with a cool Hemingwayesque moralism.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
82% Brad's Status (2017) The story is told from Brad's point of view, and the movie is filled with his voice-over musings, fantasy sequences, and flashbacks, but it remains oddly impersonal.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
68% Romance of Astrea and Celadon (2008) Rohmer left the stage with an audacious flourish, infusing a fifth-century pastoral fantasy (adapted from a seventeenth-century novel) with a lifetime of stories, passions, and big ideas.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2017
85% It (2017) The movie is not terrifying but blandly edifying; its scares, foreshadowed as if by telegram, are delivered less effectively than its life lessons.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2017
30% I Do... Until I Don't (2017) Delivers a warmly satisfying resolution without showing how it gets there.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
86% Nocturama (2017) The frivolity of the film's unexpressed political earnestness-Bonello's unwillingness to give voice to his or his characters' ideas-is matched by the emptiness of its aesthetic.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 28, 2017
93% Logan Lucky (2017) Soderbergh films the movie with swing, relishing the overlapping and intertwining strands of the complex plot, the brightly lit personalities of the characters it involves, and the magnificently conceived, essential tiny details ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 28, 2017
90% Le Procès (The Trial) (1962) Who better to reveal the system's evil genius than Welles, the golden boy turned Hollywood martyr?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 28, 2017
78% The Killers (1964) Siegel's terse, seething, and stylish direction glows with the blank radiance of sheet metal in sunlight; the movie's bright primary colors and glossy luxuries are imbued with menace, and its luminous delights convey a terrifyingly cold world view.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 28, 2017
93% Boxing Gym (2010) Wiseman captures these staccato polyrhythms both visually and sonically. There's not a lot of hitting here; he clearly delights in the sport's balletic beauty.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
No Score Yet Lumiere (1976) It's no bravura showcase, no feast of technique or display of virtuosity; it's a calm, lyrical melodrama with an air of lightness and grace, a survivor's story.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
No Score Yet Yeast (2008) Bronstein's exhilarating meditation on performance and identity advances to a resolution that is as surprising as it is transcendent.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
82% Patti Cake$ (2017) Jasper hits every note of sentimental manipulation in a tale that's as fleetingly affecting as it is insubstantial and mechanical.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
14% Planetarium (2017) For all of its virtues and distinctions, Planetarium isn't a comprehensive experience; it's a teeming and gleeful grab bag of deft cinematic flourishes.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 11, 2017
83% Detroit (2017) Bigelow doesn't have as original, as distinctive, as reflective a sense of cinematic drama as the extraordinary subject matter of "Detroit" requires.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2017
92% Dunkirk (2017) Nolan's sense of memory and of history is as flattened-out and untroubled as his sense of psychology and of character.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
86% Ingrid Goes West (2017) Aubrey Plaza's fiercely committed performance nearly rescues this dubious contrivance from absurdity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017