Shelly Kraicer Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Shelly Kraicer

Shelly Kraicer
Shelly Kraicer's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Senses of Cinema, Cinema Scope

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
67% Hidden Man (2018) In the end, Jiang Wen is exactly and only Jiang Wen, and so is everyone else in the film: every character plays like a dispersed, splintered psychological manifestation of Jiang Wen writ large. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2018
100% Baby (Bao bei er) (2018) Liu's film doesn't waste a second. Its brisk efficiency keeps things moving relentlessly forward, even as overly emotive confrontations are kept to a relative minimum.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2018
No Score Yet Erased, Ascent of the Invisible (Tirss, rihlat alsoo'oud ila almar'i) (2018) Halwani's exemplary structural intelligence and moral sophistication allows him to avoid the pratfalls of cinematic archivality: every minute counts.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
86% Cities of Last Things (2018) The strong performances from Ho's uniformly fine actresses (Liu Juei-chi, Louise Grinberg, Shih Yin, Huang Lu, and Ding Ling) do much to help complicate and even transcend the generic limitations.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
95% Shadow (2019) A master colourist, Zhang has set himself an interesting experiment in Shadow: he almost completely abjures the use of colour. ‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2018
83% The Crossing (Guo Chun Tian) (2018) Bai's cinema flows and sparks, and shows with intelligence and precocious authority how the problematic circulation (authorized or not) of goods, desires, and humanity across borders is at the foundation of our 21st-century existence.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 10, 2018
No Score Yet Jinpa (Zhuang si le yi zhi yang) (2018) A moral tale that embeds pent-up violence in a ritually inscribed cycle of revenge and redemption activates undercurrents (best left implicit) that clearly and quietly signify in a Tibetan/Chinese context.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
100% Carmine Street Guitars (2018) Our world is indeed digitalizing, brutalizing, evacuating its own soul, but in certain rare islands of utopian harmony they still make them like they used to, and it's wonderful to watch. And listen to.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
78% The Grandmaster (2013) The Grandmaster is a martial-arts film, whose complicated narrative strategies and ambitious attempt to re-stylize a form that looks to be increasingly moribund, sets it apart from its generic brethren.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
95% Bai ri yan huo (Black Coal, Thin Ice) (2015) It's the darkest shade of noir, replete with dismemberment and sexual violence, though Diao juices it up with a subtly insinuating neon glow, a remarkably daring sense of absurdist humour, and some very witty and stylish flourishes.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
94% Journey To The West (2014) We are even transported by Tsai's ecstatic play of light, space, and time-cinema at its purest.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
89% Coming Home (2015) In Wang's vision, the past continues to define the present: a life worth living, for Wang, is predicated exactly on the necessity of acknowledging and accounting for past crimes; past traumas, un-repented, can only haunt and pollute the present.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
89% Office (Hua li shang ban zu) (2015) If Hou Hsiao-hsien can make a martial-arts fantasy, then Johnnie To can damn well make a glossy musical. And with Office he has, and it's splendid‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
No Score Yet Murmur Of The Hearts (Nian Nian) (2015) Murmur of the Hearts' gorgeous cinematography and lush soundscape create a palpably beautiful environment of nostalgia, longing, and mystery where past, present, fantasy and reality mingle to impressive effect.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
96% Kaili Blues (Lu Bian Ye Can) (2016) The intense blues and greens, the saturated, tangibly thick light and shade of the settings, the impossible visions of twirling, ever-present disco mirror balls, defying space, are conjured into light and sound, and, via poetry, into cinema.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
No Score Yet Ta'ang (2016) Wang is a visual and aural poet. Ta'ang is unforgettable for the sounds and images it leaves burned into our memories.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
100% The Stairs (2016) This documentary approach to filming from the inside gets us far deeper into the complicated reality of drug dependence and recovery than standard television-style docs can reach.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
No Score Yet Yi Lu Shun Feng (2013) Godspeed demonstrates Chung's cinematographic chops, with a typically dazzling sense of colour and provocative off-kilter compositions.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
100% The Cinema Travellers (2016) The film is special, though, in its devotion to something closer to a pure, direct-cinema ethic.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017
84% I Am Not Madame Bovary (2016) There are layers of meaning to all of this that are worth working out on your own. All in all it's a surprising and daring (in more ways than one) work from China's best popular filmmaker.‐ Cinema Scope
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2017