Sherilyn Connelly Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Sherilyn Connelly

Sherilyn Connelly
Sherilyn Connelly's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Village Voice, SF Weekly

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
97% Endless Poetry (Poesía Sin Fin) (2017) While it's all gloriously bats--- in that uniquely Jodorowskian way, the picture ends with quite possibly the most unapologetically heart-on-sleeve climax in the old coot's canon.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
77% Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge (2017) Storywise, MC: TCOK is mostly underwhelming.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
100% Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) The town's history would be interesting even if not for the films that were buried there, but that particular motherlode of frozen motion pictures makes it all the more so.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
70% Moscow Never Sleeps (2017) The picture resembles the recent 100 Streets, though it could have used some of that film's unabashed soapiness.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
89% Lost in Paris (Paris pieds nus) (2017) Like formalistic whimsy, self-indulgence is tricky to get right, and Abel and Gordon do.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
14% Battle Scars (2017) Don't even think about laughing, you bad person.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
89% The Ornithologist (O ornitólogo) (2017) The Ornithologist undercuts its carefully constructed world in its final minutes, but up through the moment when the moon turns red as blood, it's a mesmerizing journey.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2017
47% The Sea (2013) As grief-porn goes, The Sea washes up closer to Every Thing Will Be Fine than Louder Than Bombs.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2017
No Score Yet The Last Dalai Lama? (2016) When he passes, we shall not look upon his like again.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2017
68% The Journey (2017) For viewing pleasure, it's hard to beat the verbal sparring between the avuncular Meaney and a more-Wormtail-than-Wormtail Spall.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
100% Nowhere To Hide (2017) Zaradasht Ahmed's documentary Nowhere to Hide is a you-are-there gut-punch about Iraq after the American military's 2011 withdrawal.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
85% Moka (2017) Frédéric Mermoud's Moka is a revenge potboiler that never quite boils while you're watching it.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
No Score Yet Walking Distance (Distancias cortas) (2015) While there there's a lot of hugging along the way, damn if every hug isn't earned.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
71% Manifesto (2017) Cate Blanchett plays 13 unconnected characters in wildly disparate situations who shout, whisper, and otherwise recite both famous and not-so-famous manifestos, including those by Fluxus, Dogme 9 -- yay! -- and the Dadaists.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
44% The Bad Batch (2017) Although Ana Lily Amirpour's new The Bad Batch has much higher production values, her A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night is a tough act to follow, and Batch is a bit of a letdown even if you haven't seen Amirpour's stellar debut.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2017
95% The Women's Balcony (Ismach Hatani) (2017) The Women's Balcony is an equally hilarious and infuriating look at how patriarchies attempt to assert themselves and how terrified men often get when women stand up for themselves.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
78% The Hero (2017) The well-worn plot is ultimately not as important as the simpler, moment-to-moment pleasures of hanging out with Elliott.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
92% Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (2017) Abacus: Small Enough to Jail works as both a true-life legal thriller and a portrait of a tight-knit community under a tone-deaf siege.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2017
No Score Yet Turn It Around: The Story of East Bay Punk (2017) Corbett Redford's Turn It Around: The Story of East Bay Punk takes 153 minutes to tell the story of a music scene famous for jamming econo, it's also reasonable - because it's a story that might go untold otherwise.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 31, 2017
49% Churchill (2017) In its study of a famously tubby alpha male and how his wife helped him through one of the most difficult parts of his career, Churchill has echoes of Hitchcock - the movie, not the movie director's style - though it's a much better picture.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 31, 2017
75% Wakefield (2017) If Wakefield is a bit overlong, it also ends at exactly the right moment.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
72% The Commune (Kollektivet) (2017) The Commune may look like a Danish take on The Ice Storm, and while it does share themes of upper-middle-class types experimenting with the loosened sexual mores of the 1970s, it zigs just when you'd expect it to zag.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
95% Radio Dreams (2017) One of the more touching of [the] stories finds poetry in the fact that you're never more than 20 minutes from water in this town. (Hunh.) ‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
95% Prevenge (2017) It still has the spirit of a Wright production, and that's a standard to which all violent comedies should aspire.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
80% Like Crazy (La pazza gioia) (2017) There are worse places to be not entirely sane.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
100% Angkor Awakens: A Portrait of Cambodia (2017) Lieberman looks at the broader picture of how it happened and how the current generation of Cambodians move past their parents' lingering trauma - clinically diagnosed as baksbat, or "broken courage" - and make a better world for themselves.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 19, 2017
100% BANG! The Bert Berns Story (2017) Bang! The Bert Berns Story isn't one of the more essential boomer-nostalgia docs, but it hits the target more often than not.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
87% One Week and a Day (Shavua ve Yom) (2017) One Week and a Day juggles tones deftly, finding the humor in the fact that no matter your pain, the world keeps turning, birds keep pooping on your windshield, and burial plots go to whoever fills out the paperwork first.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
93% Obit (2017) Obit's stealth hero is Jeff Roth, keeper of the Times' archive of clippings and photographs. It's appropriately called "the morgue," and a movie consisting only of Roth going through the drawers would be no less fascinating.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
28% Voice from the Stone (2017) The film suffers from pacing problems and an unfortunate usage of its female lead. ‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
92% A Quiet Passion (2017) A Quiet Passion ... contains one of the best scenes of 2017, as Dickinson chews out her newspaper's publisher for altering the punctuation of her highly stylized words. ‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
76% Buster's Mal Heart (2017) Nobody plays barely maintained sanity like Malek, it's fun to spot all the unintentional Mr. Robot parallels, and those unfamiliar with the show might be inspired to check it out.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
100% The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki (Hymyilevä mies) (2017) The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki is a portrait of a man who is ultimately a nurturer rather than a destroyer - in spite of punching people for a living - and it's one of the best films of the year.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
95% I Called Him Morgan (2017) In the end, everyone involved in I Called Him Morgan seems sad but not surprised by the tragic turn of events. Which is life, pretty much.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2017
92% Finding Oscar (2017) "Happy" may not be the word for Finding Oscar's ending, but "tearful" certainly is.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2017
28% Voice from the Stone (2017) The film suffers from pacing problems and an unfortunate usage of its female lead. ‐ Village Voice
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2017
88% David Lynch: The Art Life (2017) Though it will mostly appeal to fans of Lynch and/or modern art, everyone can appreciate a harrowing story involving his college roommate Peter Wolf - later of the J. Geils Band.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2017
60% Cezanne and I (Cézanne et Moi) (2017) There's a hint of a compelling movie in Danièle Thompson's Cézanne et Moi, but it's overshadowed by some unfortunate storytelling choices and a whole lot of Frenchiness. ‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
100% Truman (2017) Truman's resolution to its title arc is unexpected and the only way that makes emotional sense.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2017
85% My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea (2017) Sinking Into the Sea is fun, but an hour of just Rudolph and Watts in the recording studio would be no less buoyant.‐ Village Voice
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2017
73% The Void (2017) Storywise, The Void evokes Carpenter's Assault on Precinct 13 and his terminally underrated Prince of Darkness; that not a bad thing, because it's a sturdy framework that Carpenter himself adopted from Howard Hawks.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2017
98% Your Name. (Kimi No Na Wa.) (2017) Your Name is the most beautiful anime since Patema Inverted, with which it shares themes about the difficulties of personal connections as represented by inexplicable cosmic phenomena.‐ Village Voice
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2017
96% After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) (2017) intergenerational conflict is very much in the Ozu domain, but this is not to say that Kore-Eda doesn't have his own authorial stamp.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
64% For Here Or To Go? (2017) For Here or to Go? follows the rom-com template a little too closely at times ... but makes up for it both for the issues it raises, and an ending that defies expectations in a very satisfying way. ‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
91% In Search of Israeli Cuisine (2017) In Search of Israeli Cuisine could well be a pilot for a Food Channel series, and the personable Solomonov is like Anthony Bourdain without the self-conscious machismo, which makes Solomonov a far more appetizing guide.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 30, 2017
70% American Anarchist (2017) American Anarchist makes the interesting choice of saving Powell's difficult childhood for the end, and while it was tragic, most people with difficult childhoods didn't go on to write books about how to make bombs.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 24, 2017
90% Frantz (2017) [Ozon] seems to enjoy playing with the color and the timeline without having to be strictly beholden to reality. And that's not a bad thing.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2017
No Score Yet Bird On A Wire (1974) Nobody's ever really themselves on camera, but when Palmer zooms in on Cohen's tear-streaked face, Bird on a Wire feels like an honest portrait of a man just barely hanging on.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2017
71% This Beautiful Fantastic (2017) Simon Aboud's whimsical yet slight This Beautiful Fantastic is the latest in the English Garden subgenre, in the vein of The Lady in the Van or A Man Called Ove (which is Swedish but still qualifies).‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
No Score Yet San Francisco Cable Cars (2017) Strephon Taylor's San Francisco Cable Cars is a loving and very entertaining history of that most iconic of local conveyances, while also tracing the rise and fall of above-ground mass transit in this country.‐ SF Weekly
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017