TIME Staff

TIME Staff
TIME Staff's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): TIME Magazine
Publications: TIME Magazine

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
50% Alibi (1929) More credible than most crook pictures. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
29% Coquette (1929) Her cast is bad and her director no genius. But somehow... [Pickford] turns her difficulties to assets, brings vividly to life the southern smalltown coquette who liked one fellow too well to suit her father. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
No Score Yet Sins of Man (1936) Sad, simple and superfluous. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
No Score Yet And Sudden Death (1936) It does present, within conventional limits, an energetic little sermon on good highway manners. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
89% Imitation of Life (1934) Because of the authority with which it is acted and the skill with which Director John Stahl has built up individual episodes, the picture remains an efficient tearjerker, outspoken in its praise of motherlove. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2019
81% The Green Pastures (1936) [Rex Ingram] doubles ably as Adam and the Prophet Hezdrel. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2019
No Score Yet Half-Marriage (1929) Only the occasional entry of Vaudevillain Ken Murray and his orchestra relieve the dreadful tedium of Half Marriage. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 4, 2019
No Score Yet Wrath of the Seas (1926) Parts of this picture, made with the co-operation of the British and German governments, are fine newsreels of the Battle of Jutland. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 4, 2019
No Score Yet Harlem on the Prairie (1938) Best parts of the picture are the tunes, Harlem on the Prairie and Romance in the Rain. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet The Dance of Life (1929) The Dance of Life is too long and overdetailed; it is handicapped with a tedious theme-song. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
80% Hallelujah (1929) Vidor's skill as a picturemaker is enough alone to make Hallelujah one of the best films of the year. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
100% You're in the Navy Now (1951) When it gets up a full head of steam, [You're in the Navy Now] bubbles with fun. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 5, 2019
No Score Yet Miss Fane's Baby Is Stolen (1934) A topical film which draws tears with out half trying. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
No Score Yet I Am Suzanne! (1933) Partly a masterpiece and partly a mess. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
No Score Yet Massacre (1934) Adapted from a novel by Robert Gessner, it adds up into an indignant crusade against the white man's treatment of [Native Americans]. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
43% Hello, Dolly! (1969) It relies almost exclusively on the celebrated eyes, ears, nose and throat of Streisand. Her musicianship remains irreproachable. But her mannerisms are so arch and calculated that one half expects to find a key implanted in her back. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2019
35% Valley of the Dolls (1967) The cliche of show business as a dream world may have been wide-eyed and saccharine. But Novelist Susann's view of Hollywood as nightmare Valley merely adds up to the old naivete in reverse. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2019
35% Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992) "Does the word duh mean anything to you?" It does to director Fran Rubel Kuzui, whose frenzied mistrust of her material is almost total. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 26, 2019
71% Chu Chin Chow (1934) U.S. cinemaddicts may find the photography in Chu Chin Chow inferior to most recent Hollywood musicomedies... but are likely to approve the decor, [music, and Anna May Wong,] the only performer in the cast whose name is familiar to them. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 13, 2019
36% The Trip (1967) The Trip is a psychedelic tour through the bent mind of Peter Fonda, which is evidently full of old movies. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2019
94% Rope (1948) In photographing the action, Director Hitchcock brought off a tour de force. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2019
100% Trader Horn (1931) Incomparably the best jungle picture made so far. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 7, 2019
No Score Yet The Crazy-Quilt (1966) In the relations between these two people Director Korty achieves the fullest realization of his theme. He demonstrates day by day, crisis by crisis, how fear and lust and ignorance transform at last into the sacred mystery of marriage. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2018
No Score Yet Operation Manhunt (1954) Will Kuluva, as the Russian spymaster, radiates the impersonal menace of a prescription for arsenic, while as Gouzenko, Townes suggests very gracefully a sort of soulful bureaucrat. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet The Black Shield of Falworth (1954) Everything is just as it ought to be in such a picture. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet Hansel and Gretel (1954) The novelty quickly wears off. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
77% White Christmas (1954) A big fat yam of a picture richly candied with VistaVision (Paramount's answer to CinemaScope), Technicolor, tunes by Irving Berlin, massive production numbers, and big stars. Unfortunately, the yam is still a yam. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
98% A Star Is Born (1954) All this, plus a dozen big musical sequences, makes Star a mighty long gulp of champagne; but, like champagne, it is hard to refuse. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
84% Downhill Racer (1969) A modest effort but a good one. It may be the first film in history that starts at the top, goes steadily downhill, and still stays interesting along the way. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 30, 2018
85% Applause (1929) [It is] surprising to find Rouben Mamoulian, recently director of legitimate productions for Manhattan's Theatre Guild, experimenting so weakly with the cinema. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 7, 2016
95% My Fair Lady (1964) In this literal, beautiful, bountiful version of the most gilt-edged attraction in theater history, Jack Warner has miraculously managed to turn gold into gold. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2015
91% Midnight Cowboy (1969) No amount of obfuscation can obscure the film's vaulting performances. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 23, 2015
94% Patton (1970) The movie's vision blurs the man and, incidentally, the just war around him. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 22, 2015
100% Indiscreet (1958) A funny, freewheeling version of Broadway's Kind Sir. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2014
95% Some Like It Hot (1959) Lemmon digs out most of the laughs in the script. As for Marilyn, she's been trimmer, slimmer and sexier in earlier pictures. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2011
86% Piccadilly (1929) Like most English pictures, the drama is crudely shaped and conventionally directed. Anna May Wong does the best acting. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 2, 2011
96% In the Heat of the Night (1967) No deep solutions are suggested in this subtle and meticulously observed study. Yet Director Norman Jewison has used his camera to extract a cer tain rough-cut beauty from each protagonist. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2009
83% A Man for All Seasons (1966) One of the most intelligent religious movies ever made. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2009
84% The Sound of Music (1965) In dialogue, song and story, Music still contains too much sugar, too little spice. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2009
85% Tom Jones (1963) The film is a way-out, walleyed, wonderful exercise in cinema. It is also a social satire written in blood with a broadaxe. It is bawdy as the British were bawdy when a wench had to wear five petticoats to barricade her virtue. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2009
98% Lawrence of Arabia (1962) It is O'Toole who continually dominates the screen, and he dominates it with professional skill, Irish charm and smashing good looks. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2009
93% West Side Story (1961) Unhappily, the film shares a serious flaw in the essential conception of the show; both are founded on a phony literary analogy and on some potentially vicious pseudo-sociology. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
94% The Apartment (1960) A comedy of men's-room humours and water-cooler politics that now and then among the belly laughs says something serious and sad about the struggle for success, about what it often does to a man, and about the horribly small world of big business. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
79% Gigi (1958) Gigi is dressed to kill, but if all the French finery impresses the customers, it also smothers the story. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
95% The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) It is a whale of a story, and in the telling of it, British Director David Lean does a whale of a job. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
71% Around the World in 80 Days (1956) The wonder is that this Polyphemus of productions does not simply collapse of its own overweight; but, thanks principally to Showman Todd, the picture skips along with an amazing lightness. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
100% Marty (1955) Ernest Borgnine as Marty lives up to all the promise he showed as the sadist in From Here to Eternity, and at the same time brilliantly shatters the type-cast he molded for himself in that picture. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
98% On the Waterfront (1954) On the Waterfront has a script that is a work of love and shows it. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
92% From Here to Eternity (1953) Scriptwriter Daniel Taradash rescued, if not quite a gem, then at least a high-grade industrial diamond from this rough original. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009
45% The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) The movie's plot does not quite hold all this pageantry together, but De Mille's scripters and actors enter into the thing in the proper flamboyant spirit. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 18, 2009