TIME Staff

TIME Staff
TIME Staff's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): TIME Magazine
Publications: TIME Magazine

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
78% Call Northside 777 (1948) Honestly and resourcefully filmed, the picture was shot, for the most part, against the Chicago backgrounds where the actual events took place. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2021
94% The Women (1939) The Women, like its original, is a mordant, mature description of the social decay of one corner of the U. S. middle classes. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2021
85% The Power and the Glory (1933) Playwright Sturges, no O. Henry, no Conrad, has ordered his parts to diminish the suspense, not to heighten it. With a technic calling for smart treatment, he has used it on the simplest possible problems, the simplest types of characters. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 13, 2021
No Score Yet Speakeasy (1929) Other inaccuracies mark a picture which as a story seems too disjointed to entertain rustics and as reporting, too slipshod to amuse metropolites. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 12, 2021
72% The Man from Blankley's (1930) The dialog is witty, and Barrymore, hiccupping slightly, plays through one lunatic scene after another with a charmingly satirical manner. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2021
56% Queen of the Nightclubs (1929) Feeble directing of these elements is compensated chiefly by the beautiful... Lila Lee as a night club entertainer. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2021
93% The Hitch-hiker (1953) The drama itself is confined to one basic situation: captives at the gunpoint mercy of a trigger-happy killer. But, playing this conflict for all it is worth, the movie works up a good deal of sweaty suspense without using false theatrics. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 24, 2021
92% The Defiant Ones (1958) Director Kramer makes a story of human understanding slowly carved out of two men's common violence, loneliness and desperation. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2021
81% The Man With the Golden Arm (1955) At its best, though, the story lays bare the naked truth of human bondage, and this truth shines like a sword. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2020
95% The Champ (1931) Utterly false and thoroughly convincing, The Champ is a monument to the cinema's skill in achieving second-rate perfection. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2020
97% A Night at the Opera (1935) Groucho follows his own formula of throwing out gags, good and bad. as fast as he can talk, letting the good ones float the bad ones, trusting that the average will favor him. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
98% Home of the Brave (1949) For all its faults, the film has novelty, emotional wallop and the excitement that comes from wrestling with a real problem, rather than fencing with a cooked-up plot. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2020
80% The Raven (1935) The picture is stuffed with horrors to the point of absurdity. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2020
93% Dead of Night (1945) It offers the same sort of spine-cooling thrill you get from listening to a group of accomplished liars swapping ghost stories. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 12, 2020
90% Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) Fredric March, ably assisted by Miriam Hopkins and Rose Hobart, is magnificent as Hyde, and he gives Jekyll a stilted Victorian elegance which, being a little false, makes Hyde's existence seem more credible. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 7, 2020
94% Faust (1926) From the ever-serviceable Faust story is derived a weird fairytale, a picture story of the powers of evil on earth. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 7, 2020
80% Song of the Flame (1930) Audiences who like operetta and audiences in the country who have never had much chance to decide whether they like it or not may find Song of the Flame to their taste. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2020
89% Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1928) Altogether, in its slyly sympathetic exposition of gold-digging as a fine art, the picture has precisely the delicious flavour of its literary model. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2020
89% That Royle Girl (1925) Perhaps it is not one of Mr. Griffith's best... It is, however, one of Miss Dempster's best and that is of immense importance. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2020
85% Kismet (1930) The only remaining element that might give interest to Kismet is the able performance of 72-year-old Otis Skinner in the role he first acted 19 years ago. The rest of the players are indifferent and the play itself is pretty well outdated. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2020
70% The Divine Woman (1928) The Divine Woman is another vehicle for the extraordinarily tempestuous passions of Actress Greta Garbo. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 17, 2020
75% Babe Comes Home (1927) Ruth, variously known as the Home Run King, the Biffing Bambino, the Sultan of Swat, the Mogul of Mayhem, etc., does poorly in a film recounting the life story of a baseball player. Mr. Ruth is not even qualified to hold a cinema actor's lipstick. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2020
83% Ladies of the Mob (1928) Ladies of the Mob is excellent entertainment, if you refrain from getting analytical about the plot. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2020
63% The Shepherd of the Hills (1928) Old-fashioned as a hair sofa is this movie carved from a Harold Bell Wright best seller. Dully, the story preaches the value of turning the other cheek, the ex-minister here involved turning his with the monotony of a metronome. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2020
73% Rough House Rosie (1927) Moderately diverting nonsense - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2020
79% The Bad and the Beautiful (1953) Though some of the characters may be bad and others beautiful, few are either real or believable. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2020
67% The Dove (1927) Plot, photography, direction and the performances of Noah Beery and Norma Talmadge, make the picture about three notches better than the run of hot country idylls. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2020
40% The Madonna of Avenue A (1929) It is a dull, wandering fiction. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2020
No Score Yet Little Man, What Now? (1934) Little Man, What Now is not one of Director Borzage's best pictures but it has the qualities of intelligence, honesty and observance which are indelibly part of his style. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2020
100% The Navigator (1924) You will watch [Buster Keaton] on shipboard, attacked by cannibals, prodded by swordfish. You will continue happily in his constituency. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2020
83% Three Women (1924) The unseen hand of Ernest Lubitsch pulls the strings for these popular puppets and makes them dance acceptably. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2020
29% Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1924) The superlatively fine acting of Blanche Sweet, the polished direction of Neilan and exquisite photography displaying English landscape at its loveliest save the production from entering the lists of sordid melodramas. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
60% The Case of Lena Smith (1929) Although he has told his story too carefully, perhaps, and dedicated it too consciously to the majesty of suffering, Josef von Sternberg, director of Underworld, often gives this unusual picture the Spartan, grand effect he tries for. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2020
100% Love (1927) Good handling of minor parts by George Fawcett, Brandon Hurst, Emily Fitzroy and Philippe de Lacy, intelligent photography, brilliant direction are enough for any picture that includes such a performance as that supplied by Actress Garbo. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2020
86% The Rogue Song (1930) It was notable because the 100% technicolor was an improvement on previous color films. Too, it fills any huge auditorium with much the best voice yet known to cinemaddicts, the voice of Grand Opera Baritone Lawrence Tibbett. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 9, 2020
100% The Patriot (1928) Emil Jannings as the tsar, Lewis Stone as the count are more than interesting: they are true. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2020
86% So Big (1924) Director Charles Brabin bent carefully over his knitting of deft acting into homely, racy atmosphere, until the final quarter of this film; then Director Brabin dropped the needles and cried: "Paste up the rest!" - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2020
67% Aloma of the South Seas (1926) Miss Gray, while no Bernhardt, holds up her end of the acting capably enough. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2020
No Score Yet Dick Turpin (1925) A sense of comedy assists materially. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2020
No Score Yet Golden Bed (1925) It has specimen splendor of the De Mille method. It is about as tasty as painted candy. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2020
88% The Way of All Flesh (1927) While Mr. Jannings is on the screen, as he is most of the time, even the bleary portions of the film are compelling. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 1, 2020
86% Convention City (1933) Convention City is a glib, disorganized batch of footnotes on a familiar aspect of U. S. business. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 1, 2020
83% Huckleberry Finn (1931) Director Taurog, while he retains many of the happiest Twain inventions, gives them a less sharply human inflection. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
No Score Yet Walk the Proud Land (1956) [Murphy proves] that a white man can singlehanded do better than the entire U.S. Army at hunting down Indian rebels, and can bring peace, freedom and prosperity to the Apaches -- provided, of course, that the scriptwriter is on his side. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
57% Streets of Laredo (1949) It offers a reasonable amount of outdoor scenery, a short measure of shooting and riding and much too much brooding over whether Ranger Holden should betray his old pal Carey. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
90% Frenzy (1972) In case there was any doubt, back in the dim days of Marnie and Topaz, Hitchcock is still in fine form. Frenzy is the dazzling proof. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 13, 2020
92% Family Plot (1976) Out of respect for Hitchcock's stature, and his years, Family Plot should be considered as fleetingly as possible. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
67% Torn Curtain (1966) Alas, good Hitchcock touches no longer make a good Hitchcock film, and Curtain falls, more redolent of mothballs than mystery. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 7, 2020
71% The Chalk Garden (1964) The Chalk Garden. Transplanted from stage to screen, Enid Bagnold's witty, pitiless and elliptical high comedy yields only a withered bouquet of hearts and flowers. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 7, 2020
100% True Confession (1937) True Confession is skillfully played and paced, keyed up to the pitch of the dizziest haywire skit. Yet what makes True Confession funnier than most haywire comedies is that as melodrama it could be just as effective. - TIME Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020