Virginia Graham

Virginia Graham
Virginia Graham's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer® when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator
Publications: The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
93% Intruder in the Dust (1949) I found this film completely absorbing, and if I had the strength I would see it again. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2021
81% The Man With the Golden Arm (1955) As the women in [Frankie's] life, Eleanor Parker, his neurotic crippled wife, and Kim Novak, who fights despairingly to save him, are wholly admirable. and the subsidiary parts are amply filled. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 22, 2020
79% The Bad and the Beautiful (1953) If this is Hollywood with the lid off, the smell is not pleasant, but it is certainly powerful, and i strongly urge you to take a sniff. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2020
67% I'll See You In My Dreams (1951) This story, as enacted by Mr. Danny Thomas and Miss Doris Day, is remarkable for its similarity to the life-histories of all the lyric-writers who have ever lived. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2020
83% Carrie (1952) The direction, as might be expected, is as polished as ebony, occasionally lingering a little too long perhaps to suck the substance out of a scene, but never pausing to philosophise or preach. The story is told simply and well. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2020
No Score Yet Lease of Life (1956) Despite its many virtues, it lacks the essential factor, that of inspiring interest. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2020
17% Untamed Frontier (1952) Though smoothly directed by Mr. Hugo Fregonese, it has little new to offer on the hoof situation. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted May 7, 2020
No Score Yet Montana (1950) Though the film follows the accustomed lines of westerns, and though neither Mr. Flynn nor Miss Smith is anything out of the ordinary, the advent of sheep in a picture of this kind is so unusual that one can scarce refrain from feeling refreshed. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2020
No Score Yet Three Husbands (1951) A disappointing film. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2020
97% Rear Window (1954) The acting is impeccable. The novelty appealing. The climax thrilling. The length too long. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 16, 2020
100% Winchester '73 (1950) I enjoyed every minute. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 15, 2020
97% Born Yesterday (1950) Miss Holliday's slow awakening from near-imbecility to near-intelligence is certainly enchanting, and both Mr. Broderick Crawford's brashness and Mr. William Holden's shyness leave nothing to be desired. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2020
96% The Rules of the Game (La règle du jeu) (1939) Though pictorially it is very satisfying, M. Renoir has mixed high tragedy and low comedy.to such an extent that one is bewildered. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
66% Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951) Oh the slowness of it all, the solemnity, the splendid tediousness of the sequences, the beautiful boring silences, the long, long looks of love! - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2020
98% Marty (1955) It is not, as we were led to expect, the very best film ever to be fabricated by anyone anywhere, but is an above-average picture made appealing by the charm of its story and the sensitive talents of its actors. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
43% East Side, West Side (1949) If the whole thing seems shinier than real life, it never skids into the unbelievable. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
95% All the King's Men (1949) In short, this story of blackmail, graft and intimidation makes a powerful and interesting film, and much of the honour due to it must go to Mr. Robert Rossen, its director. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
No Score Yet Time In The Sun (1940) Each face and hat and monument, each dance and procession, each cloud, each landscape holds the eye entranced, and there is no striving for effect, the subjects seemingly flowing irresistibly into grace. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
No Score Yet Steel Town (1952) Neither metallographists nor humorists will be wholly satisfied. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
93% Sabrina (1954) Miss Hepburn is irresistible. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
99% On the Waterfront (1954) [Marlon Brando's] colleagues act and they act well. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
100% Mr. Hulot's Holiday (Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot) (1954) As for [director] Jacques Tati taking a holiday by the seaside, he is sometimes so exquisitely funny he sets the heart rocking with joy. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
92% From Here to Eternity (1953) Finely directed by Fred Zinnemann, this film, cynical and tough as it is has an integrity, a courage, a warm liveliness about it which invite the deepest admiration. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
No Score Yet Prelude to Glory (Prélude à la gloire) (1950) I do not share the young maestro's love for Liszt, but certainly he interprets him with all the fire, tenderness and passion of an old Hungarian sensualist. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
47% The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) A vast vulgar strident Technicolored turmoil of circus-life under the biggest Big Top imaginable, and with more clowns, elephants and trapeze artists to any square inch on the globe's surface. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
No Score Yet Good Time Girl (1948) Good Time Girl makes a shot at dealing seriously and honestly with the problem of juvenile delinquency, and it does not fall too short of the mark. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2019
95% Hamlet (1948) Sir Laurence Olivier's presentation of Hamlet proves once again that it is possible to translate Shakespeare into photographic terms without losing the full flavour, the richness and dignity of its verse. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2019
98% A Star Is Born (1954) From this almost traditional mush, Moss Hart, basing his script on an older one by Dorothy Parker, Alan Campbell and Robert Carson, has written a superb satire on Hollywood through which winds a plausible and moving love story. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2018
No Score Yet Crime and Punishment (1948) An impressive film comparing very favourably with other versions. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2018
92% Broken Lance (1954) Although its theme is not original... Edward Dmytryk... has made his copy-book characters as fresh as his panoramas. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2018
No Score Yet Beau Brummell (1954) The others, though well directed by Curtis ' Bernhardt, accompanied by Richard Addinsell's music, and lovely to look at, are of medium quality only. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2018
No Score Yet The Hideout (The Small Voice) (1948) All this is admirably done, and eventually provides melodrama of an order as English and as excellent as muffins. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2018
94% Rope (1948) Though it is above the average for thrillers, the main interest lies in its technical novelty. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2018
No Score Yet Cass Timberlane (1947) Over-long, but to my mind never tedious. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2018
No Score Yet The Golden Horde (1951) It is hard to know to whom The Golden Horde will appeal. Perhaps to the very naive or to those who take a perverse delight in Hollywood's historical horrors. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
No Score Yet For Heaven's Sake (1950) At moments, certainly, [Clifton Webb] is funny, but the sentimentality of the theme is, on the whole, so clogging that one can only smile very faintly... - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
No Score Yet Mrs. Fitzherbert (1947) Miss Joyce Howard as Mrs. Fitzherbert is entirely charming even if her reading of the part lacks depth... but on the whole this film forfeits our admiration by being a little boring, a little long, a little wrong and somehow strangely inhuman. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
96% An American in Paris (1951) In the musical line there has been little of any quality since On the Town; so it is with a deep contented sigh that I can now point a recommending finger at something nearly as good, almost as stimulating and undoubtedly aesthetically superior. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
88% The Enforcer (1951) [The Enforcer] is a very good film indeed, and one which must appeal to anyone who happens to have a base instinct about him. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
77% Carmen Jones (1954) As a play with music by Bizet one can forget that he and Mr. Hammerstein have taken a liberty with one of one's earliest memories, and after seeing it one must try to forget that, truth to tell, their Carmen Jones is really much better than Carmen. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% Carnival in Flanders (1935) Few people can argue either the rightness of reviving M. Jacques Feyder's [Carnival in Flanders], an enchanting film if there ever was one. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% Forbidden Games (Jeux interdits) (1952) As an indictment of war it is unsurpassed. As a work of art it is a notable contribution. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet 711 Ocean Drive (1950) [711 Ocean Drive was] made, it is claimed, under police protection, which is why, perhaps, it is such an incoherent bundle of nerves. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% The Breaking Point (1950) The film is always interesting and often exciting, and Mr. Michael Curtiz has directed it in a tough and sullen style which is most effective. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
78% Kim (1951) All is plot and counterplot, hazard and heroics, and for grown-ups who have an affection for the more tender passions this plain and loveless tale from the hills is, despite its many qualifications, a trifle tedious. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
88% Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) Good tunes, humour, imaginative presentation and abounding vitality are welded together to make this film the most Memorable Musical of 1954. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Lilacs in the Spring (Let's Make Up) (1954) There could hardly be two less suitable team-mates than Anna Neagle and Errol Flynn, and in Herbert Wilcox's Lilacs in Spring they do each other no good. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Clouded Yellow (1951) This film is a moderately good murder mystery puffed into a certain importance by the presence of that ever-admirable actor Mr. Trevor Howard and by the simple attractions of Miss Jean Simmons. - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
95% Out of the Past (1947) As an antidote to post-prandial lethargy it will do yeoman service... - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Three Sinners (Meurtres) (1950) Fernandel, well out of the range of comedy, proves that he is an actor of infinite capabilities... - The Spectator EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018