Virginia Graham Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Virginia Graham

Virginia Graham
Virginia Graham's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The Spectator

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet The Hideout (The Small Voice) (1948) All this is admirably done, and eventually provides melodrama of an order as English and as excellent as muffins.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2018
97% Rope (1948) Though it is above the average for thrillers, the main interest lies in its technical novelty.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2018
No Score Yet Cass Timberlane (1947) Over-long, but to my mind never tedious.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2018
No Score Yet The Golden Horde (1951) It is hard to know to whom The Golden Horde will appeal. Perhaps to the very naive or to those who take a perverse delight in Hollywood's historical horrors.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
No Score Yet For Heaven's Sake (1950) At moments, certainly, [Clifton Webb] is funny, but the sentimentality of the theme is, on the whole, so clogging that one can only smile very faintly...‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
No Score Yet Mrs. Fitzherbert (1947) Miss Joyce Howard as Mrs. Fitzherbert is entirely charming even if her reading of the part lacks depth... but on the whole this film forfeits our admiration by being a little boring, a little long, a little wrong and somehow strangely inhuman.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
95% An American in Paris (1951) In the musical line there has been little of any quality since On the Town; so it is with a deep contented sigh that I can now point a recommending finger at something nearly as good, almost as stimulating and undoubtedly aesthetically superior.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
88% The Enforcer (1951) [The Enforcer] is a very good film indeed, and one which must appeal to anyone who happens to have a base instinct about him.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
75% Carmen Jones (1954) As a play with music by Bizet one can forget that he and Mr. Hammerstein have taken a liberty with one of one's earliest memories, and after seeing it one must try to forget that, truth to tell, their Carmen Jones is really much better than Carmen.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% Carnival in Flanders (1935) Few people can argue either the rightness of reviving M. Jacques Feyder's [Carnival in Flanders], an enchanting film if there ever was one.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% Forbidden Games (Jeux interdits) (1952) As an indictment of war it is unsurpassed. As a work of art it is a notable contribution.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet 711 Ocean Drive (1950) [711 Ocean Drive was] made, it is claimed, under police protection, which is why, perhaps, it is such an incoherent bundle of nerves.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% The Breaking Point (1950) The film is always interesting and often exciting, and Mr. Michael Curtiz has directed it in a tough and sullen style which is most effective.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
86% Kim (1951) All is plot and counterplot, hazard and heroics, and for grown-ups who have an affection for the more tender passions this plain and loveless tale from the hills is, despite its many qualifications, a trifle tedious.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
88% Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) Good tunes, humour, imaginative presentation and abounding vitality are welded together to make this film the most Memorable Musical of 1954.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Lilacs in the Spring (Let's Make Up) (1954) There could hardly be two less suitable team-mates than Anna Neagle and Errol Flynn, and in Herbert Wilcox's Lilacs in Spring they do each other no good.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Clouded Yellow (1951) This film is a moderately good murder mystery puffed into a certain importance by the presence of that ever-admirable actor Mr. Trevor Howard and by the simple attractions of Miss Jean Simmons.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
94% Out of the Past (1947) As an antidote to post-prandial lethargy it will do yeoman service...‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Three Sinners (Meurtres) (1950) Fernandel, well out of the range of comedy, proves that he is an actor of infinite capabilities...‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Woman in the Hall (1948) Miss G. B. Stern's novel, The Woman in the Hall, has been turned into an excellent film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Forbidden Street (1949) Only Miss Fay Compton as Miss O'Hara's mother and Mr. Anthony Tancred as her brother bring a touch of reality into this shadow play, surely, so far, the most disappointing film of the year.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Affair in Monte Carlo (1952) [Affair in Monte Carlo] is a film of such artificiality and bathos the very typewriter keys cling together to avoid describing it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Louisa (2011) Unexpectedly enjoyable... is Louisa, a comedy concerning, of all things, the love-life of a grandmother.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% Treasure Island (1950) Mr. Walt Disney's first British picture, Treasure Island, can be voted a tremendous success.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Ruy Blas (1948) In spite of an untamable personal prejudice, I derived much enjoyment from this picture, and I commend it to all who love the magnificent absurdities of Victor Hugo's masterpiece.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet His Kind of Woman (1951) I should like to yawn in its face, but I must commend to you Mr. Vincent Price who, as a ham film star on vacation, is, when translating his braggadocio screen roles into real life, intensely funny.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet I Was a Communist for the FBI (1951) I have a penchant for films based on fact, but I Was A Communist for the F.B.l. failed to convince me that it had more than a passing contact with reality.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Fuga in Francia (2013) Fuga in Francia is also an excellent film, a story set, as is the vogue nowadays, against backgrounds of genuine streets, cafés, stations... with their attendant clutches of amateur actors.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Vivere in Pace (To Live in Peace) (1947) [Aldo] Fabrizi, who acted the part of the priest in Open City, triumphs once again as a peasant.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Intruder (1953) To turn to more cheerful things I am overjoyed to say that The Intruder, based on a novel by Robin Maugham, is an extremely good British picture, acted extremely well by a uniformly talented cast and admirably directed by Guy Hamilton.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet We, the Women (1953) Perhaps this was meant to be a soufflé ? It has failed to rise.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Wishing Well (The Happiness of Three Women) (1954) Well directed by Maurice Elvey, this film is blessed with amusing dialogue, and the words, like stepping stones, carry one across the chasms which yawn, treacle deep, below. Even so one gets a tiny bit splashed.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Blue Lagoon (1949) It is, in fact, rather charming.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Edward, My Son (1949) Edward My Son seems to be foolproof.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Slave (L'Esclave) (1953) Given an 'X' certificate, it is as moral as a monastery inasmuch as it illustrates, with salutary terrors, the effect of drug-taking.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Last Command (1955) Starring Sterling Haydn, Ernest Borgnine and Anna Marie Alberghetti, this stodgily cooked slab of history is memorable only for its battle scenes, which are truly rousing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
87% The Seven Year Itch (1955) This is a wonderful comedy performance. So too, somewhat surprisingly, is Marilyn Monroe's.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Exile (1947) The Exile, which [Douglas Fairbanks] has both written and produced... is one of the least convincing and least entertaining bits of history it has ever been my misfortune to see.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet This Time for Keeps (1947) This film is not quite as awful as it sounds for the simple reason that the players therein are at the top of their profession... even a thousand gorgeous bathing belles in ochre yellow swim-suits cannot altogether dim their lights.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Sleep, My Love (1947) The implausibility of the story is successfully screened by the dialogue which is refreshingly natural, and there are many delightful touches which the producer, Mr. Buddy Rogers, exploits to advantage.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Meet Me Tonight (Tonight at 8:30) (1952) This is the champagne to take away the taste of tea and kippers and it is most revivifying.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
33% Androcles and the Lion (1953) Bernard Shaw's irreverent views on Christianity, so brilliantly expounded in that exceptionally poor play of his, Androcles and the Lion, have, in Gabriel Pascal's even poorer adaptation, lost a deal of their original sharpness.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Bread, Love and Dreams (Pane, Amore e Fantasia) (1954) The heroine, Italy's golden pin-up girl, is, as a wild and beautiful peasant, neither too wild nor too beautiful to be credible, and both she and the lesser characters have an endearing quality about them which is irresistible.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet Kyriakatiko xypnima, (Windfall in Athens) (1956) Suddenly, out of the Hellenic skies, has dropped a film which puts Greece, as the blurb says, 'on the international horizon'... it can take its place in the ranks of entertainment without apology.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
100% The Golden Coach (Le Carrosse d'or) (1953) The eye never wants to laze, it is either excited or soothed, and M. Renoir leads it to follow exquisite patterns. What a brilliant director he is!‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet The Little Kidnappers (The Kidnappers) (1954) In sum this is a touching, funny, sad, delightful filet and should not be missed.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
78% White Christmas (1954) However, between the painful alpha and omega of this film there is a lot of extremely pleasant entertainment.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
80% The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954) William Holden, Grace Kelly, Frederic March and... Mickey Rooney act extremely well.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
60% Animal Farm (1954) Even so, when only one figure in a crowd is animated the impression given is that of laziness or lack of funds rather than design.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018
No Score Yet To Paris With Love (1955) In the nature of a fairy story, this film lacks the courage to be one and weaves uneasily between the ponderously obvious and slapstick.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2018