Wilfrid Sheed

Wilfrid Sheed
Wilfrid Sheed's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): The New York Review of Books Esquire Magazine
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Leonard McCombe/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
84% Barefoot in the Park (1967) Robert Redford makes a nice quiet change as the hero. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
58% Enter Laughing (1967) A genuine New York City movie in a New Jersey world. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
73% You Only Live Twice (1967) The gadgets are demure, house broken, the Japanese settings are restful, the plot, such as it is, is taken seriously. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
No Score Yet Luv (1967) Perhaps the real problem is that Murray Schisgal's play was abstract, an arrangement of ideas with just a little skin on them, and movies have to do abstraction differently. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
100% Divorce American Style (1967) Debbie Reynolds and Dick Van Dyke are gruesomely well-cast. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
44% A Guide for the Married Man (1967) [A Guide for the Married Man] wallows in its cheapness, and thus has no satiric place to stand. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
100% Cool Hand Luke (1967) The movie cheats slightly by hinting Newman's death is a triumph - as if all crucifixions were alike. But this is a very small carp at a very fine movie. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
94% In the Heat of the Night (1967) Looks and sounds first-rate before lapsing into a weary wave of the finger. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
22% Hurry Sundown (1967) So low has the South fallen that Otto Preminger hasn't even bothered to get the accents straight. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
No Score Yet The Whisperers (1967) An investigation of this sort into the phenomenology of old age is rare and praiseworthy and an actress who can demonstrate the basic positions is possibly unique... Edith Evans takes the curse off this with a wealth of quirky observation. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
No Score Yet Woman Times Seven (1967) The film serves as another stake through the career of DeSica. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
57% The Honey Pot (1967) Harrison has reached that point in his self-creation where he can turn even a blowsy under-endowed movie like The Honey Pot to his own greater honor and glory. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
88% The Dirty Dozen (1967) It must just be taken as another violence-fantasy no better and no worse than a dozen others. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
47% Privilege (1967) As social or political comment, the movie is low-level paranoia -- i.e., paranoia that is not even ingenious enough to play along with. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 10, 2019
98% The Godfather (1972) The movie is preposterously entertaining, telling Puzo's compendium of old-time Mafia anecdotes with all the gravity of Old Testament epic. - The New York Review of Books EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2018
95% Cabaret (1972) The Bowles cycle is a gruesomely instructive guide to our worst show biz conventions. - The New York Review of Books EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2018
86% Bonnie and Clyde (1967) The relationship between Clyde (Warren Beatty) and his brother (Gene Hackman) is one of the best pieces of detail work I can recall in a movie; in fact Gene Hackman's performance is an extraordinarily fine one throughout. - Esquire Magazine EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2018