Summer Movie Guide 2012 - Rotten Tomatoes

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  • Video: Max is the "American Sniffer"

    The stars of Max, Thomas Hayden Church, Lauren Graham, and Josh Wiggins, along with director Boaz Yakin, discuss working with Carlos, the canine star of the movie, (and how much nicer his trailer was). Grae also floats some alternative titles for the film past the cast, with limited success.

  • Box Office Guru Wrapup: The Dark Knight Rises Again

    This weekend, a pair of new franchise films could not stop Bane and Batman from ruling the North American box office for a third straight time as The Dark Knight Rises continued to reign supreme, once again taking the gold medal position. The big-budget sci-fi remake Total Recall took home the silver while the bronze went to the kidpic Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days. Neither of the new releases showed major muscle and the overall Top 20 slumped 27% from last year's levels as overall moviegoing continued to be affected by a lack of exciting titles and the ongoing drama of the London Olympics.

  • Critics Consensus: Total Recall Isn't An Affair To Remember

    This week at the movies, we've got artificial memories (Total Recall, starring Colin Farrell and Kate Beckinsale) and summertime blues (Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days, starring Zachary Gordon and Steve Zahn). If you're going to remake a modern classic, you'd better bring something new to the table. Unfortunately, critics say this new Total Recall is visually impressive, but it swaps out the existential anxiety and eccentric panache of Paul Verhoeven's 1990 film for an overabundance of action set-pieces. The Diary of a Wimpy Kid franchise has been nothing if not consistent; each movie chronicles the terrors of middle school with moderate wit and little elegance.

  • Total Recall: Partial Recall

    After many months of examining cinematic history under the Total Recall banner, our column meets its destiny this week with the release of Len Wiseman's Total Recall remake. Of course, we knew we needed to dedicate this week's list to recall -- specifically, movies featuring protagonists who have lost their memory. Amnesia is a popular topic for filmmakers, leaving us with enough material to make this a special super-sized edition that features examples from pretty much every genre -- and we're still sure we managed to (ahem) "forget" at least one of your favorites. It's the total partial recall you've been waiting for!

  • 24 Frames: The Films of Colin Farrell

  • 24 Frames: Dance Movies

  • Box Office Guru Wrapup: Dark Knight Leads Sluggish Frame

  • Vince Vaughn's 10 Best Movies

    Vegas, martinis, and the words "baby" and "money" helped launch Vince Vaughn's film career -- and helped established him as an extraordinarily compelling cinematic scoundrel, a role he's played repeatedly over the last decade and change. But that isn't all Vaughn can do, as he's proven while assembling an admirably eclectic filmography, moving from comedy to horror to action thrillers and back again, turning in memorable cameoes in films as diverse as Into the Wild, and Anchorman, and sharing screens with everyone from Richard Attenborough to Jennifer Lopez in the process. When HBO's hit drama True Detective returns next year, Vaughn will take his place as one of the new season's lead actors, and to celebrate, we decided to revisit his best-reviewed films, Total Recall style!

  • Critics Consensus: The Dark Knight Rises Is Certified Fresh

    We've only got one new wide release in theaters this week, but it's one of the most hotly-anticipated movies of the summer: "The Dark Knight Rises," the final installment of Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy, starring Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway, and Tom Hardy. Find out what the critics have to say on Rotten Tomatoes. With "Batman Begins" and (especially) "The Dark Knight," Christopher Nolan imbued the Batman mythos with a unique blend of visceral thrills, intelligence, and realism. His Batman trilogy concludes with "The Dark Knight Rises," and the critics say the result is a sprawling, ambitious, emotionally satisfying film with a pulse-pounding climax that (mostly) justifies its epic runtime.

  • Total Recall: Batman Movies

    The Masked Manhunter. The Caped Crusader. Bats. You know who we're talking about, film fans, and chances are you've had this Friday circled on your calendar since Warner Bros. announced that July 20, 2012 was the day The Dark Knight Rises would be arriving in theaters. The conclusion of Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy, Rises is one of the year's most anticipated releases, and in honor of this momentous occasion, we decided to dedicate this week's list to a (mostly) fond look back at the Bat in all of his cinematic guises. With the Bat-signal blazing, it's time for Total Recall!

  • Box Office Guru Wrapup: Fourth Ice Age Pic Opens On Top

  • Summer Movie Preview 2012

    Having a tough time trying to figure out which of the big Summer movies are worth seeing this year? Have no fear! We here at Rotten Tomatoes know the value of a helpful guide in choosing where to spend your hard-earned money, and to that end, we present our annual Summer Movie Preview! What you see below is a quick look at the five most anticipated films of May, June, July, and August, and if you want a more comprehensive guide, check out our full Summer Movie Preview on the web! With that in mind, stay cool, have a great summer, and K.I.T.

  • Critics Consensus: The Amazing Spider-Man Is Certified Fresh

    This week at the movies, we've got a legendary web-slinger (The Amazing Spider-Man, starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone), a deadly cartel (Savages, starring Taylor Kitsch and Salma Hayek), and a teenage dream (the 3D concert documentary Katy Perry: Part of Me). What do the critics have to say? The Spider-Man franchise might have set a record for the quickest reboot, though critics say The Amazing Spider-Man is still entertaining, gritty, action-packed stuff - even if we've seen it all before. Oliver Stone may have mellowed in recent years, but critics say Savages is a return to the disreputable Stone films of old - one that's messy, but often queasily compelling.

  • Total Recall: Oliver Stone's Best Movies

    He's won 10 Golden Globes, nine Oscars, and four BAFTAs during his long and illustrious career -- but Oliver Stone has somehow never been the focus of his own Total Recall, so we decided to change that in honor of this weekend's Savages, an intriguingly cast drug drama based on the Don Winslow novel about a pair of pot farmers racing to free the woman they love from a Mexican drug cartel. Given his lengthy filmography, you know Stone's got some good stuff in his filmography -- and the cream of the crop is right here in this week's list.

  • Five Favorite Films with Jay Duplass

    A couple of weeks back we heard from writer-director Mark Duplass on his five favorite sibling movies, so it seemed only fitting that we give his brother and co-collaborator Jay a chance to add his voice to the family discussion. Following the success of their mainstream-leaning Jeff, Who Lives at Home earlier this year, the brothers Duplass are back in theaters this week with a smaller-scale piece that recalls their mumblecore origins. The Do-Deca-Pentathalon -- which was actually shot before the team went "Hollywood" with Cyrus -- focuses on the rivalry between two brothers (notice a theme?) as they compete in a homemade version of the Olympics. Cannily timed for the 2012 event, in fact, and sure to appeal to all those fans of both overblown sports circuses and micro-budgeted indie films. To mark Pentathalon's release, then, here are Jay Duplass's five favorite films. Take it away, sir.

  • Box Office Guru Wrapup: Audiences Have Wild Time with Ted and Mike

    A pair of new R-rated films dominated the North American box office sending ticket sales soaring to a new record for the biggest June weekend in history. The comedy Ted and the drama Magic Mike both overperformed and connected with their target audiences while Tyler Perry's latest effort Madea's Witness Protection delivered his usual potent numbers. Overall, it was the third best weekend of 2012 as success came from a handful of original movies and not from one big franchise juggernaut opening. The marketplace is now in great shape entering what will be a gigantic July.

  • Critics Consensus: Ted Is Funny and Crude, Magic Mike Is Certified Fresh

    This week at the movies, we've got an uncouth stuffed toy (Ted, starring Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis); striptease artists (Magic Mike, starring Channing Tatum and Matthew McConaughey); a family secret (People Like Us, starring Chris Pine and Elizabeth Banks); and a defensive granny (Madea's Witness Protection, starring Tyler Perry and Eugene Levy). Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane makes his big screen directorial debut with Ted, and critics say this vulgar, sometimes touching comedy retains the irreverent spirit of his TV work. Magic Mike might look like just another pretty face, but don't be fooled -- critics say this hunky drama/comedy has a heart and a brain too.

  • Total Recall: Channing Tatum's Best Movies

    It takes guts to shake your moneymaker in public, let alone for a filmmaker as talented as Steven Soderbergh, so give Channing Tatum points for courage: That's exactly what he did in Magic Mike, the stripper drama that's thrusting its well-oiled abs into theaters this week. In honor of Channing's chutzpah, we decided to dedicate this week's list to his up-and-coming career -- which is still young, but contains more noteworthy films than you might initially suspect. It's time for Total Recall!

  • Five Favorite Films with Bob Balaban

    Droll, erudite and extremely affable, Bob Balaban is the kind of guy you could spend hours listening to -- which is probably why Wes Anderson cast him as New Penzance's all-purpose meteorologist narrator in his latest hit, Moonrise Kingdom. Balaban's own career as an actor, writer and director goes way back, and via many curious avenues: He made his debut in the classic Midnight Cowboy, has worked with the likes of Woody Allen, Ken Russell and Christopher Guest, and famously appeared as François Truffaut's interpreter in Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind. He's also directed and produced film and TV, appeared in theater, and been the NBC executive responsible for sinking Seinfeld -- on TV, anyway. With Moonrise Kingdom expanding nationally this week, sat down for a talk with Balaban about the film, his experience working with Wes Anderson, and much more. During the course of the interview, he also talked about five of his favorite films.

  • 24 Frames: The Films of Mark Wahlberg

  • Five Favorite Films with Patton Oswalt

    Between his stand-up comedy, astute writing on pop culture and wonderfully odd performances in movie and TV roles, Patton Oswalt is a something of a modern media renaissance man. He's voiced a rat for Pixar, terrorized a football franchise in the excellent Big Fan, and earned well-deserved praise for his part in last year's Young Adult; and this week, Oswalt appears in director Lorene Scafaria's Seeking a Friend for the End of the World, in a small but funny role as an enthusiastic party-goer who's succumbed to his most wanton desires as the apocalypse approaches. In the spirit of impending doom we chatted with Oswalt earlier this week, and asked him to pick five films he'd want to watch if the world was about to end.

  • Total Recall: U.S. Presidents On Film

    He worked his way up from his humble log cabin roots to become an entrepreneur, a lawyer, and finally the President of the United States -- and now Abraham Lincoln is an action hero, courtesy of this weekend's supremely silly-sounding Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. In honor of Honest Abe's return to the big screen, we decided to take a look at some other films about real-life Presidents -- and although none of them feature commanders-in-chief slaying the undead, we think you'll still find a few classics in the bunch. Hail to the Total Recall!

  • Five Favorite Films with David Cross

    Actor, writer and comedian David Cross is perhaps best known (in certain circles, anyway) for his role on TV's Arrested Development, the cult show that will soon be resurrected, thanks to years of dogged fan enthusiasm, for a feature film. But his credits extend well beyond the role of Tobias -- Cross has featured in numerous TV and film projects, including Mr. Show, Tim and Eric, Kung Fu Panda and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, to name but a few. This week, Cross stars in the ensemble comedy drama It's A Disaster, which features four couples holed up in a house as the end of the world approaches. Directed by Todd Berger, making his feature debut, the movie plays at this week's Los Angeles Film Festival en route to a theatrical release later this year. We had a chance to speak with Cross recently, and asked him to pick his five favorite films. "These are not my five favorite movies," he explained. "They are five of my favorite movies (of which I have hundreds)."

  • Five Favorite Films with Mark Duplass

    One of the breakout stars of the "mumblecore" movement that evolved during the mid-2000s, Mark Duplass has gone from writing, directing and starring in no-budget independent films to successfully adapting his brand of comedy-drama for a (relatively more) mainstream audience. This week, Duplass continues his fertile run with Your Sister's Sister, Humpday director Lynne Shelton's well-reviewed comedy which finds him caught in a love triangle with two sisters -- played by Emily Blunt and Rosemary DeWitt. To mark the movie's opening, Duplass shared his Five Favorite "sibling" Films with us -- doubly fitting, considering his working dynamic with his brother and how much of their stuff revolves around that very relationship.

  • Five Favorite Films with Wes Anderson

    There aren't many modern American filmmakers with a body of work as unique as that of Wes Anderson. His latest is Moonrise Kingdom, a fantastical tale of imagined childhood that follows two kids -- AWOL scout Sam (Jared Gilman) and moody dreamer Suzy (Kara Hayward) -- on their adventure through adolescent first love. Beautifully calibrated both visually and emotionally, the film, which opened Cannes, is drawing some of the best reviews of the director's career. We had the opportunity to chat with Anderson recently, where he talked about his inspirations for Moonrise Kingdom, his childhood obsessions, and how his experience in animation affected the way he approached his latest project. Read on for that and more, but first, we quizzed him on his Five Favorite Films.

  • Box Office Guru Wrapup: Brave Hits the Bullseye

    This weekend, princess power ruled the North American box office as Disney and Pixar's Brave opened at number one setting a new record for the biggest debut ever for an animated film centered around a female character. The weekend's other new releases were not met with as much enthusiasm as the stylish action thriller Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter premiered in third place with moderate numbers while Steve Carell's Seeking A Friend for the End of the World was dead on arrival in tenth place. The overall marketplace was down again from a year ago when Pixar also reigned supreme. Moms, daughters, and others lined up for Brave.

  • Critics Consensus: Rock of Ages Hits a Sour Note

    This week at the movies, we've got a rock 'n' roll romance (Rock of Ages, starring Julianne Hough and Tom Cruise) and some father-son bonding (That's My Boy, starring Adam Sandler and Andy Samberg). What do the critics have to say? Given the runaway success of Glee, it's no surprise that the hit jukebox musical Rock of Ages -- featuring songs by Journey, Bon Jovi, Poison, and the like -- made the transition from the stage to the screen. Unfortunately, critics say this headbanger's ball is unlikely to rock you like a hurricane; though it provides some campy thrills, the film is overstuffed with underdeveloped characters and plot strands.

  • Critics Consensus: Prometheus is Certified Fresh

    This week at the movies, we've got an alien resurrection (Prometheus, starring Noomi Rapace and Michael Fassbender) and an incredible journey ( Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted, with voice work from Ben Stiller and Jada Pinkett Smith). What do the critics have to say? More than three decades after Alien helped to usher in a new era in sci-fi cinema, Ridley Scott heads back to the cosmos for the ambitious Prometheus. And critics saythat while this kinda-sorta prequel to Alien lacks the focus and brutal efficiency of Scott's 1979 classic, it's well acted, visually stunning, and filled with big ideas.

  • Total Recall: Ridley Scott's Best Movies

    Over the course of his 35-year filmmaking career, Ridley Scott has dabbled in pretty much every genre: from historical epics to action flicks, fantasy to heartwarming drama, he's done it all -- and he's racked up an impressive pile of awards and nominations along the way. But since 1982's Blade Runner, sci-fi has been conspicuously absent from Scott's filmography -- until now, that is. With the decidedly Alien-ish Prometheus landing in theaters this weekend, we decided now would be the perfect time to take a fond look back at 10 of the brightest critical highlights from the Ridley Scott oeuvre, and you know what that means: It's time for Total Recall!

  • Box Office Guru Wrapup: Snow White Exceeds Expectations at No. 1

    Universal scored a big box office victory with the better-than-expected opening of its expensive fairy tale adventure Snow White and the Huntsman which captured the number one spot driven by strong fan demand. The PG-13 film grossed an estimated $56.3M from 3,773 theaters for a muscular $14,910 average and delivered the best opening weekend of the summer for any non-Avengers film. In fact, the sword-wielding princess even beat out the $54.6M debut of last weekend's Men in Black 3 which got a boost from 3D surcharges, a holiday opening, and nearly 500 more theaters. It's also grossed more in three days than studio stablemate Battleship has made in three weeks.