Leaves of Grass - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Leaves of Grass Reviews

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Eric Hynes
Movieline
September 22, 2010
Suffice to say that Blake Nelson doesn't have the visual gifts of his Minnesotan mentors, leaving us undistracted by surface flair and fully focused on his cartoonish characters and ragged, oddly callow script.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/10
Top Critic
Michael Phillips
At the Movies
April 5, 2010
You could get whiplash from his movie's mood swings.
Nora Lee Mandel
Film-Forward.com
September 23, 2010
Many clichés in uneven and odd mix of guffaws and philosophical analysis. . .[C]onsiderable violence surprisingly erupts...[M]ost fun is watching Norton interact with Norton.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/10
Top Critic
Kirk Honeycutt
Hollywood Reporter
September 18, 2009
An identical twins comic crime drama goes seriously wrong.
Nick Schager
Slant Magazine
March 29, 2010
Messy genre jumbling has rhyme and reason in Leaves of Grass, as it speaks directly to the film's portrait of life's unpredictability and uncontrollability.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Brian Orndorf
BrianOrndorf.com
April 2, 2010
The picture loses its mind on an abrasive hunt for irreverence, twisting something securely oddball into an affected, unnecessarily toxic tale of brilliant knuckleheads living up to their Tulsa potential.
Full Review | Original Score: D+
Kevin Carr
7M Pictures
January 5, 2014
really unbalanced
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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A.O. Scott
At the Movies
April 5, 2010
It's not the violence itself that bothers me, it's just that it completely destroys the tone of the movie.
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Keith Uhlich
Time Out
March 31, 2010
It would be overly polite to call this a pale shadow of the tone-shifting Coen brothers farces from which Nelson -- who costarred in O Brother, Where Art Thou? -- is taking his cues.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Jesse Hassenger
Filmcritic.com
April 1, 2010
a fitfully enjoyable but unsatisfying playground of ambition and occasional wit
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/5
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Brandon Judell
indieWIRE
October 31, 2012
I could only bear 35 minutes, and I haven't walked out of anything since 'You, Me and Dupree.'
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Dennis Harvey
Variety
September 18, 2009
One Edward Norton performance is often enough reason to see a movie, so it comes as no surprise that the prospect of two -- he plays twins -- is very much the main attraction, and reward, of Leaves of Grass.
Top Critic
David Denby
New Yorker
March 29, 2010
The movie is a showcase for digital technology and for Norton's virtuosity, but I wish it weren't such a weightless shambles.
Marshall Fine
Hollywood & Fine
March 29, 2010
Suddenly abandons all comedic promises and turns into a sadistic action film...a textbook example of a promising movie that takes a wrong turn from which it never recovers.
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Rex Reed
New York Observer
March 31, 2010
It's just another oblique backfire from Tim Blake Nelson, whose work as a writer-director in general wallows in a bog of mediocrity.
James Luxford
The National (UAE)
August 30, 2011
Maybe too small-scale to be anything truly special, but an original and witty film that both surprises and entertains.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Shaun Munro
What Culture
February 22, 2011
Essentially Deliverance cross-bred with A History of Violence...Leaves of Grass is a peculiar rural yarn and a sweet, assured examination of lost innocence and brotherhood that succeeds largely because of Norton's multi-faceted performance.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
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Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
March 29, 2010
Tim Blake Nelson's Leaves of Grass is some kind of sweet, wacky masterpiece. It takes all sorts of risks, including a dual role with Edward Norton playing twin brothers, and it pulls them off.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Drew McWeeny
HitFix
September 20, 2010
... through it all, the two performances by Edward Norton feel natural, relaxed, utterly unlike a gimmick.
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Karina Longworth
indieWIRE
September 17, 2010
The mirror image gag is one of the oldest in the book, and yet, if done well, it never really gets old.
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