Chamber of Horrors Reviews

  • Aug 30, 2015

    Fun gimmick movie known for :"The Horror Horn" and the "Fear Flasher" over anything else. If it didn't have that, i'd give it the same rating. This wax museum murder mystery certainly isn't original, but well acted, with some scary bits. Even those are rather tsme, even though the horror horn warns us otherwise.

    Fun gimmick movie known for :"The Horror Horn" and the "Fear Flasher" over anything else. If it didn't have that, i'd give it the same rating. This wax museum murder mystery certainly isn't original, but well acted, with some scary bits. Even those are rather tsme, even though the horror horn warns us otherwise.

  • Nov 12, 2012

    When he comes after my head he'll have to risk his own. In Baltimore a strange wax museum has been formed that tracks notorious serial killers throughout history. A convicted criminal sentenced to hanging escapes by cutting his hand off and jumping off a train. Shortly thereafter a rash of killings spring up all over town. Business picks up for the wax museum as they begin creating new displays in honor of the new serial killer. "It takes time for a crawling caterpillar to become a true butterfly." Hy Averback, director of Where the Boys are '84, Venice Medical, She's in the Army Now, The Night Rider, House Calls, and The Love Boat II, delivers Chamber of Horror. The storyline for this picture is very similar to House of Wax mixed with The Tingler. The good and evil characters were interesting and well delivered and the cast delivered solid performances. The cast includes Patrick O'Neal, Suzy Parker, Cesare Danova, and Wilfrid Hybe-White. "Lovely girl. Where did you find her?" "In the fog." This movie recently aired on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and I loved the idea of a one armed serial killer. The movie was okay with some 60s gimmicky cheese sprinkled in. I did find this film entertaining and definitely worth watching. This is classic 60s horror that fans of the old school Vincent Price pictures may enjoy. "A taste for sewers is what I call it." Grade: B-

    When he comes after my head he'll have to risk his own. In Baltimore a strange wax museum has been formed that tracks notorious serial killers throughout history. A convicted criminal sentenced to hanging escapes by cutting his hand off and jumping off a train. Shortly thereafter a rash of killings spring up all over town. Business picks up for the wax museum as they begin creating new displays in honor of the new serial killer. "It takes time for a crawling caterpillar to become a true butterfly." Hy Averback, director of Where the Boys are '84, Venice Medical, She's in the Army Now, The Night Rider, House Calls, and The Love Boat II, delivers Chamber of Horror. The storyline for this picture is very similar to House of Wax mixed with The Tingler. The good and evil characters were interesting and well delivered and the cast delivered solid performances. The cast includes Patrick O'Neal, Suzy Parker, Cesare Danova, and Wilfrid Hybe-White. "Lovely girl. Where did you find her?" "In the fog." This movie recently aired on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and I loved the idea of a one armed serial killer. The movie was okay with some 60s gimmicky cheese sprinkled in. I did find this film entertaining and definitely worth watching. This is classic 60s horror that fans of the old school Vincent Price pictures may enjoy. "A taste for sewers is what I call it." Grade: B-

  • Nov 10, 2012

    Originally filmed as a TV show pilot and then padded out to feature length with two William Castle-like gimmicks, the "Horror Horn" and the "Fear Flasher" to let you know when something scary was about to happen. It kind of reminded me of a horror version of "Wild, Wild West", but not in a good way. Still, it's kind of interesting seeing Captain John McIntyre from "MASH" as a period detective.

    Originally filmed as a TV show pilot and then padded out to feature length with two William Castle-like gimmicks, the "Horror Horn" and the "Fear Flasher" to let you know when something scary was about to happen. It kind of reminded me of a horror version of "Wild, Wild West", but not in a good way. Still, it's kind of interesting seeing Captain John McIntyre from "MASH" as a period detective.

  • Nov 03, 2012

    Frightful fun for lovers of classic chills--Horror Delight Despite the Fear Flasher and Horror Horn!!

    Frightful fun for lovers of classic chills--Horror Delight Despite the Fear Flasher and Horror Horn!!

  • Mar 31, 2012

    Chamber of Horrors definitely isn't as horrific as its title implies. There's not a single drop of blood in the entire film and the only thing even remotely macabre about it is the wax sculptures on display (ALA House of Wax), but they really only serve as a backdrop to the story. An enormous amount of emphasis and screen time is spent dealing with these wax dummies, only to serve no purpose except to recreate someone's untimely end. I can't really say much more than that. Otherwise, I'd be spoiling the film... in a film that spoils itself. Whenever something heinous is about to occur, there is this weird red flash and a siren signaling to the audience that it's about to happen. It's a very William Castle sort of technique that just fails on every level. It was a gimmick cooked up by the producers when it was decided to shoot additional scenes (including a brief one with Tony Curtis) to beef up the running time and release it to theatres instead of on television, as originally planned. It's not a very good movie, but it does have a fair amount of character development that I found intriguing. That would be my only recommendation to watch it really. Another reason to watch the film, for television fans anyway, would be an early appearance by Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John in the M*A*S*H TV series. The film is also directed by Hy Averback, who was the voice of the loudspeaker in M*A*S*H, so fans of that show should find something fun in that, at least.

    Chamber of Horrors definitely isn't as horrific as its title implies. There's not a single drop of blood in the entire film and the only thing even remotely macabre about it is the wax sculptures on display (ALA House of Wax), but they really only serve as a backdrop to the story. An enormous amount of emphasis and screen time is spent dealing with these wax dummies, only to serve no purpose except to recreate someone's untimely end. I can't really say much more than that. Otherwise, I'd be spoiling the film... in a film that spoils itself. Whenever something heinous is about to occur, there is this weird red flash and a siren signaling to the audience that it's about to happen. It's a very William Castle sort of technique that just fails on every level. It was a gimmick cooked up by the producers when it was decided to shoot additional scenes (including a brief one with Tony Curtis) to beef up the running time and release it to theatres instead of on television, as originally planned. It's not a very good movie, but it does have a fair amount of character development that I found intriguing. That would be my only recommendation to watch it really. Another reason to watch the film, for television fans anyway, would be an early appearance by Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John in the M*A*S*H TV series. The film is also directed by Hy Averback, who was the voice of the loudspeaker in M*A*S*H, so fans of that show should find something fun in that, at least.

  • Bruce B Super Reviewer
    Mar 02, 2012

    This film is from a Warner Home Video Horror Double Feature I picked up at Big Lots for $3.00. Its a very well put together film for the sixties. A special in film device called the fear flasher and the horror horn warns viewers to a upcoming bloody scene, it happens 3 or 4 times in the movie and then nothing happens, kind of a spoof I believe maybe for the drive in movies. Anyway the Baltimore butcher is on the loose and killing people, and unable to solve the murder the police turn to the owners of a wax museum to help solve the crime. We even have a Vincent Price want to be in this movie Patrick O'Neal. All in all a enjoyable 1960's movie, not like slasher films of 1970 -1990 that followed. About the best wax museum film out there 4 stars,

    This film is from a Warner Home Video Horror Double Feature I picked up at Big Lots for $3.00. Its a very well put together film for the sixties. A special in film device called the fear flasher and the horror horn warns viewers to a upcoming bloody scene, it happens 3 or 4 times in the movie and then nothing happens, kind of a spoof I believe maybe for the drive in movies. Anyway the Baltimore butcher is on the loose and killing people, and unable to solve the murder the police turn to the owners of a wax museum to help solve the crime. We even have a Vincent Price want to be in this movie Patrick O'Neal. All in all a enjoyable 1960's movie, not like slasher films of 1970 -1990 that followed. About the best wax museum film out there 4 stars,

  • Tim S Super Reviewer
    Jan 12, 2012

    Chamber of Horrors definitely isn't as horrific as its title implies. There's not a single drop of blood in the entire film and the only thing even remotely macabre about it is the wax sculptures on display (ALA House of Wax), but they really only serve as a backdrop to the story. An enormous amount of emphasis and screen time is spent dealing with these wax dummies, only to serve no purpose except to recreate someone's untimely end. I can't really say much more than that. Otherwise, I'd be spoiling the film... in a film that spoils itself. Whenever something heinous is about to occur, there is this weird red flash and a siren signaling to the audience that it's about to happen. It's a very William Castle sort of technique that just fails on every level. It was a gimmick cooked up by the producers when it was decided to shoot additional scenes (including a brief one with Tony Curtis) to beef up the running time and release it to theatres instead of on television, as originally planned. It's not a very good movie, but it does have a fair amount of character development that I found intriguing. That would be my only recommendation to watch it really. Another reason to watch the film, for television fans anyway, would be an early appearance by Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John in the M*A*S*H TV series. The film is also directed by Hy Averback, who was the voice of the loudspeaker in M*A*S*H, so fans of that show should find something fun in that, at least.

    Chamber of Horrors definitely isn't as horrific as its title implies. There's not a single drop of blood in the entire film and the only thing even remotely macabre about it is the wax sculptures on display (ALA House of Wax), but they really only serve as a backdrop to the story. An enormous amount of emphasis and screen time is spent dealing with these wax dummies, only to serve no purpose except to recreate someone's untimely end. I can't really say much more than that. Otherwise, I'd be spoiling the film... in a film that spoils itself. Whenever something heinous is about to occur, there is this weird red flash and a siren signaling to the audience that it's about to happen. It's a very William Castle sort of technique that just fails on every level. It was a gimmick cooked up by the producers when it was decided to shoot additional scenes (including a brief one with Tony Curtis) to beef up the running time and release it to theatres instead of on television, as originally planned. It's not a very good movie, but it does have a fair amount of character development that I found intriguing. That would be my only recommendation to watch it really. Another reason to watch the film, for television fans anyway, would be an early appearance by Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John in the M*A*S*H TV series. The film is also directed by Hy Averback, who was the voice of the loudspeaker in M*A*S*H, so fans of that show should find something fun in that, at least.

  • Jun 18, 2010

    Rarely shown Warner Brothers horror which is essentially a combination of House of Wax and a William Castle production, the only thing this film is missing is Vincent Price. Patrick O'Neal probably gives the finest performance of a sadly undistinguished career. Technically well made and filmed in glorious colour this was a failed pilot for a TV series that was released theatrically.

    Rarely shown Warner Brothers horror which is essentially a combination of House of Wax and a William Castle production, the only thing this film is missing is Vincent Price. Patrick O'Neal probably gives the finest performance of a sadly undistinguished career. Technically well made and filmed in glorious colour this was a failed pilot for a TV series that was released theatrically.

  • Jan 19, 2010

    Even though hardly anything grisly is shown, that stupid "fear flasher" and "horror horn" never failed to make me antsy and the final victim's death included a really good jump.

    Even though hardly anything grisly is shown, that stupid "fear flasher" and "horror horn" never failed to make me antsy and the final victim's death included a really good jump.

  • Sep 22, 2009

    Not an Edgar Wallace remake despite the title, this is more of a slasher variation on House of Wax. Made as a tv pilot, Warner gives this good production values and surprisingly gory kills despite the Castle-imitation "Fear Flasher" and "Horror Horn". But the plot is completely uninspired, and the understandably episodic nature bores in this format.

    Not an Edgar Wallace remake despite the title, this is more of a slasher variation on House of Wax. Made as a tv pilot, Warner gives this good production values and surprisingly gory kills despite the Castle-imitation "Fear Flasher" and "Horror Horn". But the plot is completely uninspired, and the understandably episodic nature bores in this format.