Brazil Reviews

  • Mar 16, 2021

    Wait a minute, was this a superhero movie? I won't ever forget about those nuns asking about some heavy weapon machinery. And that facelift scene, painful. Also, that Brazil theme is officially stuck in my head. This was a surreal trip to wherever and whenever this was supposed to happen. A dystopian and futuristic approach to a decaying society, corruption, on being a part of the tiring working class and human relations. Felt some Baby Boomer vibes here. I guess it was an impressive achievement for the time this was released, and in fact, it remains impressive to this day. Overall, it was a strange experience but had this I don't know what thing kept me engaged and focused on trying to understand the special weirdness this film has. The kind of film that usually gets better with every watch. What do you think?

    Wait a minute, was this a superhero movie? I won't ever forget about those nuns asking about some heavy weapon machinery. And that facelift scene, painful. Also, that Brazil theme is officially stuck in my head. This was a surreal trip to wherever and whenever this was supposed to happen. A dystopian and futuristic approach to a decaying society, corruption, on being a part of the tiring working class and human relations. Felt some Baby Boomer vibes here. I guess it was an impressive achievement for the time this was released, and in fact, it remains impressive to this day. Overall, it was a strange experience but had this I don't know what thing kept me engaged and focused on trying to understand the special weirdness this film has. The kind of film that usually gets better with every watch. What do you think?

  • Mar 15, 2021

    Bizarrely brilliant. But Rotten Tomatoes... Honestly, your "preview" video is spoiled rotten.

    Bizarrely brilliant. But Rotten Tomatoes... Honestly, your "preview" video is spoiled rotten.

  • Mar 07, 2021

    Hilarious take on an even more hilarious look at what society seems to be marching towards at full speed. So much is funny because it rings so close to reality. One of my favorite movies.

    Hilarious take on an even more hilarious look at what society seems to be marching towards at full speed. So much is funny because it rings so close to reality. One of my favorite movies.

  • Feb 18, 2021

    Brazil is exactly what you'd expect from a Monty Python alumni like Terry Gilliam. It's weird, unpredictable, difficult to digest for those on a different frequency, but very clever and subversive under the surface. Very much a modern version of 1984, though the director has admitted to never having read the book, it's a tale of totalitarianisms, consumerism and rampant, crippling bureaucracy, taking place in a world where you can barely pick your nose without having to fill out a form. The films colour palate helps to highlight the divide between the elite and the working class, with the former dwelling in sumptuous surroundings while the latter slave away in grey, monochromatic office blocks. It's deliberately over the top and exaggerated, as you'd expect from Terry Gilliam, and it can be easy to lose track of the story and where its going. I think this was probably intentional, since we're supposed to lament the system and its machinations just as our lead does. The jokes are surreal and come right out of nowhere, and the cinematography is constantly striking and memorable, with odd angles and strange perspectives contributing to its fantasy-like aesthetic. It was definitely about 20 minutes too long and some scenes have a habit of dragging on unnecessarily. The film is at its best in the first half, as it gets overloaded towards the end and you actively wish for it to stop. I loved the bleak ending, and wish that more filmmakers were brave enough to end their movies on a bum note if it fits the tone of the story. Here a happy ending would have been completely out of place. I can't see myself ever watching it again, but all the tiny background details do add a certain degree of rewatchability. But whether you see it once or a thousand times, Brazil is a film that is impossible to forget.

    Brazil is exactly what you'd expect from a Monty Python alumni like Terry Gilliam. It's weird, unpredictable, difficult to digest for those on a different frequency, but very clever and subversive under the surface. Very much a modern version of 1984, though the director has admitted to never having read the book, it's a tale of totalitarianisms, consumerism and rampant, crippling bureaucracy, taking place in a world where you can barely pick your nose without having to fill out a form. The films colour palate helps to highlight the divide between the elite and the working class, with the former dwelling in sumptuous surroundings while the latter slave away in grey, monochromatic office blocks. It's deliberately over the top and exaggerated, as you'd expect from Terry Gilliam, and it can be easy to lose track of the story and where its going. I think this was probably intentional, since we're supposed to lament the system and its machinations just as our lead does. The jokes are surreal and come right out of nowhere, and the cinematography is constantly striking and memorable, with odd angles and strange perspectives contributing to its fantasy-like aesthetic. It was definitely about 20 minutes too long and some scenes have a habit of dragging on unnecessarily. The film is at its best in the first half, as it gets overloaded towards the end and you actively wish for it to stop. I loved the bleak ending, and wish that more filmmakers were brave enough to end their movies on a bum note if it fits the tone of the story. Here a happy ending would have been completely out of place. I can't see myself ever watching it again, but all the tiny background details do add a certain degree of rewatchability. But whether you see it once or a thousand times, Brazil is a film that is impossible to forget.

  • Jan 29, 2021

    ♦️ My least favorite of my three favorite Terry Gilliam films. 1) Time Bandits, 2) The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, 3) Brazil. ♦️ It makes you think the most and is less of an escape from reality than a reflection of reality. Now that reflection is twisted; but the glaring reality of it should shock any sane person to question the world around them. Only the government can fix your broken A/C, printing mistakes, checks to fix the problem and torture by government and government bureaucracy gone amuck. Sometimes it is too close to the truth that it should be classified as a horror and not a drama (imdb). ♦️

    ♦️ My least favorite of my three favorite Terry Gilliam films. 1) Time Bandits, 2) The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, 3) Brazil. ♦️ It makes you think the most and is less of an escape from reality than a reflection of reality. Now that reflection is twisted; but the glaring reality of it should shock any sane person to question the world around them. Only the government can fix your broken A/C, printing mistakes, checks to fix the problem and torture by government and government bureaucracy gone amuck. Sometimes it is too close to the truth that it should be classified as a horror and not a drama (imdb). ♦️

  • Dec 23, 2020

    Gilliam tries to put everything in it: dark humor, dystopia, dreamy sequences, social criticism, action, romance and drama... And you know what? with his unique and underrated style (which absolutely isn't only visual) he quite manages to pull it off.

    Gilliam tries to put everything in it: dark humor, dystopia, dreamy sequences, social criticism, action, romance and drama... And you know what? with his unique and underrated style (which absolutely isn't only visual) he quite manages to pull it off.

  • Dec 15, 2020

    On my short list of favorite sci-fi movies.

    On my short list of favorite sci-fi movies.

  • Dec 05, 2020

    Brazil, or funny 1984, is at the bare minimum an entirely unique piece of cinema. Gilliam brings his Python satirical flair to a comprehensive worldbuilding effort, mocking the hints of a dystopian future that he saw in everyday life, and amplifying them into distressingly familiar parodies of the real world. Its combination of whimsically depressing futurism and flat out absurist tendencies make it the most oddly charming film that you won't be able to entirely follow with respect to the actual plot. The narrative is strikingly complex and carries a frantic energy, which renders the film constantly engaging despite the consierable length. Gilliam's true talent is the ability to craft actual social commentary on a wide range of issues through a highly creative and often infectiously humorous design, while Pryce aptly frames the confused frustration that the audiences shares in, making his way through a vast ensemble of wonderfully strange characters portrayed by some A-list talent. Wacky, inventive, and influential, Brazil is essentially the closest that an has come to an original film equivalent of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, though with added substance. (4.5/5)

    Brazil, or funny 1984, is at the bare minimum an entirely unique piece of cinema. Gilliam brings his Python satirical flair to a comprehensive worldbuilding effort, mocking the hints of a dystopian future that he saw in everyday life, and amplifying them into distressingly familiar parodies of the real world. Its combination of whimsically depressing futurism and flat out absurist tendencies make it the most oddly charming film that you won't be able to entirely follow with respect to the actual plot. The narrative is strikingly complex and carries a frantic energy, which renders the film constantly engaging despite the consierable length. Gilliam's true talent is the ability to craft actual social commentary on a wide range of issues through a highly creative and often infectiously humorous design, while Pryce aptly frames the confused frustration that the audiences shares in, making his way through a vast ensemble of wonderfully strange characters portrayed by some A-list talent. Wacky, inventive, and influential, Brazil is essentially the closest that an has come to an original film equivalent of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, though with added substance. (4.5/5)

  • Dec 02, 2020

    Brazil is a masterpiece that stands alongside Animal Farm and The Wall. Maybe not everybody will appreciate it, but if you do, it will resonate like nothing else. You will remember it. You will want other people to watch it so you can relate.

    Brazil is a masterpiece that stands alongside Animal Farm and The Wall. Maybe not everybody will appreciate it, but if you do, it will resonate like nothing else. You will remember it. You will want other people to watch it so you can relate.

  • Nov 24, 2020

    I can't begin to describe how amazing this film is. The cinematography alone is brilliant and brings the audience into the strange and yet somewhat familiar world almost immediately. The acting is perfect for the style of the movie, the casting is amazing, the story and plot are also amazing. The only thing I disliked about this movie is the somewhat sexist writing of the only main female character. This being said the movie itself is so great it would be unfair to give it less then five stars.

    I can't begin to describe how amazing this film is. The cinematography alone is brilliant and brings the audience into the strange and yet somewhat familiar world almost immediately. The acting is perfect for the style of the movie, the casting is amazing, the story and plot are also amazing. The only thing I disliked about this movie is the somewhat sexist writing of the only main female character. This being said the movie itself is so great it would be unfair to give it less then five stars.