Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid Reviews

  • May 25, 2019

    Simply put, my favorite movie ever. The acting was amazing, scenery was extroidinary and storyline was top notch.

    Simply put, my favorite movie ever. The acting was amazing, scenery was extroidinary and storyline was top notch.

  • May 19, 2019

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 western based on true life events. The film was directed by George Roy Hill, who would later go on to direct such movies as The Sting. The film stars Robert Redford as The Sundance Kid and Paul Newman as Butch Cassid. The story in my opinion was both enjoyable to watch unfold, and portrayed very well. The acting was very strong especially Robert Redford as The Sundance Kid and Paul Newman as Butch Cassidy, personally I felt that they were the perfect fit for the characters, and I couldn't see anyone else playing them as well as they did. The characters were also very strong especially Butch and The Sundance kid, I felt that they had good chemistry and worked off of each other really well. The cinematography was also strong with some very interesting and well done shots of the characters and scenery. Personally I really like the western setting with most films, and I'm glad to say that it works here. From the era to the people, the settings work really well especially for keeping the two main characters on there feet. The set designs and props were done very well especially with the trains toward the beginning of the film. The costumes and makeup like the sets were also done very well especially with the two main characters Butch and The Sundance Kid. The film at points also had a very unique and good style, from the colour scheme to the cinematography. The film also had some very strong practical effects especially with the gun fights and explosions. The action like most westerns is very strong, from the cinematography to the really good tension. The film also had some pretty good music here and there which for the most part fit with the film very well. The comedy in the film was also very strong, and had me laughing out loud multiple times. The film at points was also very atmospheric, especially the final scene with Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid. The film I also really enjoy and hope to watch again and again. Over all I give it a 8/10 85% 4.25/5

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 western based on true life events. The film was directed by George Roy Hill, who would later go on to direct such movies as The Sting. The film stars Robert Redford as The Sundance Kid and Paul Newman as Butch Cassid. The story in my opinion was both enjoyable to watch unfold, and portrayed very well. The acting was very strong especially Robert Redford as The Sundance Kid and Paul Newman as Butch Cassidy, personally I felt that they were the perfect fit for the characters, and I couldn't see anyone else playing them as well as they did. The characters were also very strong especially Butch and The Sundance kid, I felt that they had good chemistry and worked off of each other really well. The cinematography was also strong with some very interesting and well done shots of the characters and scenery. Personally I really like the western setting with most films, and I'm glad to say that it works here. From the era to the people, the settings work really well especially for keeping the two main characters on there feet. The set designs and props were done very well especially with the trains toward the beginning of the film. The costumes and makeup like the sets were also done very well especially with the two main characters Butch and The Sundance Kid. The film at points also had a very unique and good style, from the colour scheme to the cinematography. The film also had some very strong practical effects especially with the gun fights and explosions. The action like most westerns is very strong, from the cinematography to the really good tension. The film also had some pretty good music here and there which for the most part fit with the film very well. The comedy in the film was also very strong, and had me laughing out loud multiple times. The film at points was also very atmospheric, especially the final scene with Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid. The film I also really enjoy and hope to watch again and again. Over all I give it a 8/10 85% 4.25/5

  • Feb 26, 2019

    "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" Wyoming, early 1900s. Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid are the leaders of a band of outlaws. After a train robbery goes wrong they find themselves on the run with a posse hard on their heels. Their solution - escape to Bolivia. With its iconic pairing of Paul Newman and Robert Redford, jaunty screenplay and Burt Bacharach score, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid has gone down as among the defining moments in late-'60s American cinema.

    "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" Wyoming, early 1900s. Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid are the leaders of a band of outlaws. After a train robbery goes wrong they find themselves on the run with a posse hard on their heels. Their solution - escape to Bolivia. With its iconic pairing of Paul Newman and Robert Redford, jaunty screenplay and Burt Bacharach score, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid has gone down as among the defining moments in late-'60s American cinema.

  • Feb 17, 2019

    A thrilling bank robbing criminal duo. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) is George Roy Hill's imaginative and fun spin on the Western genre. Hill directed Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid with an eye for unique shots. Every one of the film's wild shootouts is gripping to the last moment. His use of camera tricks, directorial angles, and sudden jump cuts is incredibly creative. George Roy Hill is particularly brilliant for starting the film with a sepia toned suspense sequence with a card game with Sundance. Hill's choice immediately sucks you into the world of Western shootouts, card games, visiting brothels, and the high stakes game of bank robbing. The first fade in of color is as breathtaking as the horizon Butch Cassidy and Sundance ride towards. Hill also uses editors John C. Howard and Richard C. Meyer's quick cuts in his editing to make the audience jump like with Sundance's first quick draw of rapid firing bullets or the train explosions. I really like Hill's perspective behind the fence while Butch rides a bicycle so that the motion of his riding looks like a film reel. The sepia toned montage of pictures while the two bandits escape to Bolivia is very fun too. Hill just understands how to direct beautiful scenes and thrilling chase sequences. Conrad Hall's cinematography is a stunning use of far wide shots for epic scale natural scenery. The dry desert and green valleys look phenomenal in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The extended chase sequence in the center of the film is gripping as you are constantly looking in the distance like the duo of robbers on the run for any sign of the law. Hall's viewpoint keeps you on edge at all times while Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid keep riding. The soundtrack to Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is classic tunes from 1969. They songs fit the film with an easy personality like a breeze of air grasping the characters as well as the atmosphere. The score from composer Burt Bacharach is charming or encompasses a chill vibe that keeps you either in still suspense or relaxed like the two at ease heroes. Notably, the supporting cast in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is impeccable. Katharine Ross is dreamy as Sundance's steadfast girlfriend Etta Place. Jeff Corey gets a shining moment when he scolds Butch and Sundance as Sheriff Bledsoe. Even a young Cloris Leachman makes an appearance as the sultry Agnes that makes out with Butch Cassidy. All in all, this is a prime example of a skilled supporting cast. Lastly, Paul Newman and Robert Redford are indescribable as the leading men Butch Cassidy and Sundance, respectively. Newman is surprisingly hilarious as the charming intellectual Butch. Newman transforms William Goldman's witty script into verbal genius. Redford is really cool as the calm and calculating sharp shooter Sundance. Redford makes you believe he is a deadly sure shot with his intense eyes and lackadaisical attitude that exudes confidence. Together, their charisma and chemistry is palpable. Newman and Redford make this film a classic with realistic performances and endless charm. Butch Cassidy and Sundance are as cool as criminals have ever looked in cinema. Check out this excellent Western crime thriller! The chase sequences and shootouts are worth the price of admission alone!

    A thrilling bank robbing criminal duo. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) is George Roy Hill's imaginative and fun spin on the Western genre. Hill directed Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid with an eye for unique shots. Every one of the film's wild shootouts is gripping to the last moment. His use of camera tricks, directorial angles, and sudden jump cuts is incredibly creative. George Roy Hill is particularly brilliant for starting the film with a sepia toned suspense sequence with a card game with Sundance. Hill's choice immediately sucks you into the world of Western shootouts, card games, visiting brothels, and the high stakes game of bank robbing. The first fade in of color is as breathtaking as the horizon Butch Cassidy and Sundance ride towards. Hill also uses editors John C. Howard and Richard C. Meyer's quick cuts in his editing to make the audience jump like with Sundance's first quick draw of rapid firing bullets or the train explosions. I really like Hill's perspective behind the fence while Butch rides a bicycle so that the motion of his riding looks like a film reel. The sepia toned montage of pictures while the two bandits escape to Bolivia is very fun too. Hill just understands how to direct beautiful scenes and thrilling chase sequences. Conrad Hall's cinematography is a stunning use of far wide shots for epic scale natural scenery. The dry desert and green valleys look phenomenal in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The extended chase sequence in the center of the film is gripping as you are constantly looking in the distance like the duo of robbers on the run for any sign of the law. Hall's viewpoint keeps you on edge at all times while Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid keep riding. The soundtrack to Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is classic tunes from 1969. They songs fit the film with an easy personality like a breeze of air grasping the characters as well as the atmosphere. The score from composer Burt Bacharach is charming or encompasses a chill vibe that keeps you either in still suspense or relaxed like the two at ease heroes. Notably, the supporting cast in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is impeccable. Katharine Ross is dreamy as Sundance's steadfast girlfriend Etta Place. Jeff Corey gets a shining moment when he scolds Butch and Sundance as Sheriff Bledsoe. Even a young Cloris Leachman makes an appearance as the sultry Agnes that makes out with Butch Cassidy. All in all, this is a prime example of a skilled supporting cast. Lastly, Paul Newman and Robert Redford are indescribable as the leading men Butch Cassidy and Sundance, respectively. Newman is surprisingly hilarious as the charming intellectual Butch. Newman transforms William Goldman's witty script into verbal genius. Redford is really cool as the calm and calculating sharp shooter Sundance. Redford makes you believe he is a deadly sure shot with his intense eyes and lackadaisical attitude that exudes confidence. Together, their charisma and chemistry is palpable. Newman and Redford make this film a classic with realistic performances and endless charm. Butch Cassidy and Sundance are as cool as criminals have ever looked in cinema. Check out this excellent Western crime thriller! The chase sequences and shootouts are worth the price of admission alone!

  • Feb 05, 2019

    Watching Redford & Newman together is a joy - but Westerns just aren't my thing and there isn't anything here that is going to overcome that fact.

    Watching Redford & Newman together is a joy - but Westerns just aren't my thing and there isn't anything here that is going to overcome that fact.

  • Jan 30, 2019

    The on screen chemistry between Newman and Redford set this film apart, a witty script and enjoyable soundtrack help to keep things moving.

    The on screen chemistry between Newman and Redford set this film apart, a witty script and enjoyable soundtrack help to keep things moving.

  • Jan 05, 2019

    A western drama comedy at it's best, without being slapstick. A must see.

    A western drama comedy at it's best, without being slapstick. A must see.

  • Dec 08, 2018

    Highly entertaining Western takes a lighthearted, but not insincere view of outlaw life and gives its two leads lots of room to expand (and enjoy) on their buddyhood, while never losing pace of the tale, and offers some spectacular landscape cinematography; the soundtrack may have been popular, but is a bit incongruous to the goings-on.

    Highly entertaining Western takes a lighthearted, but not insincere view of outlaw life and gives its two leads lots of room to expand (and enjoy) on their buddyhood, while never losing pace of the tale, and offers some spectacular landscape cinematography; the soundtrack may have been popular, but is a bit incongruous to the goings-on.

  • Dec 07, 2018

    Without a question one of my favourite Wild-West-Movies

    Without a question one of my favourite Wild-West-Movies

  • Oct 08, 2018

    A fun ride throughout, especially the part with the followers in the distance. The practical effects are amazing, the shooting on location is super cool and really puts you in the wild, Wild West. A kind of movie that is simply not being made anymore and deserves your attention .

    A fun ride throughout, especially the part with the followers in the distance. The practical effects are amazing, the shooting on location is super cool and really puts you in the wild, Wild West. A kind of movie that is simply not being made anymore and deserves your attention .