Imitation of Life Reviews

  • Jul 09, 2019

    No one with a brain could take this seriously.

    No one with a brain could take this seriously.

  • Feb 18, 2019

    this movie is about at good as a 50 year old movie can get I suppose but honestly is lack lust at best and I will never understand why an almost homeless jobless woman is screwing around at the beach and find another homeless jobless woman WTF are they doing at the beach instead of finding work

    this movie is about at good as a 50 year old movie can get I suppose but honestly is lack lust at best and I will never understand why an almost homeless jobless woman is screwing around at the beach and find another homeless jobless woman WTF are they doing at the beach instead of finding work

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best movie ever made!

    The best movie ever made!

  • Nov 22, 2018

    Great movie!!! Good story to go along with the times!!!

    Great movie!!! Good story to go along with the times!!!

  • Aug 09, 2017

    Despite the melodrama,the cast is top notch and give great performances. The performances help the film deal with delicate subject matter without exploiting it.

    Despite the melodrama,the cast is top notch and give great performances. The performances help the film deal with delicate subject matter without exploiting it.

  • Apr 19, 2017

    Of director Douglas Sirk's many fine films, this may arguably be his best (though I still think "All That Heaven Allows" is my favorite). The film follows aspiring actress Lana Turner on her way to the top in the acting world, while also being a single mother and her close relationship with her black housekeeper, Juanita Moore. Much of the film's drama revolves around Turner and Moore's daughters. Sandra Dee plays Turner's pretty blond daughter, but it's Susan Kohner as Moore's daughter who is mixed race and can pass for white who manages to steal the film. "Imitation of Life" tackles racism head on in way that was rarely done in major Hollywood films of this time. As someone who is mixed-race themself, this film does have a lot of moments that I found very identifiable with through Kohner's character, which is interesting that film on this topic made almost 70 years ago is still relevant today. Kohner was nominated for a Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, but unfortunately lost out. I wasn't all that familiar with Kohner's biography, but I was fascinated to learn that she was the daughter of Lupita Tovar and Paul Kohner, the star and the producer of the famous Universal Picture Spanish language version of "Dracula." She's also the mother of Chris Weitz and Paul Weitz, who wrote wrote some fine films including "In Good Company" and the new Star Wars film, "Rogue One." But back to the Sirk film, this is a true Hollywood classic that is a must see for all film fans!

    Of director Douglas Sirk's many fine films, this may arguably be his best (though I still think "All That Heaven Allows" is my favorite). The film follows aspiring actress Lana Turner on her way to the top in the acting world, while also being a single mother and her close relationship with her black housekeeper, Juanita Moore. Much of the film's drama revolves around Turner and Moore's daughters. Sandra Dee plays Turner's pretty blond daughter, but it's Susan Kohner as Moore's daughter who is mixed race and can pass for white who manages to steal the film. "Imitation of Life" tackles racism head on in way that was rarely done in major Hollywood films of this time. As someone who is mixed-race themself, this film does have a lot of moments that I found very identifiable with through Kohner's character, which is interesting that film on this topic made almost 70 years ago is still relevant today. Kohner was nominated for a Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, but unfortunately lost out. I wasn't all that familiar with Kohner's biography, but I was fascinated to learn that she was the daughter of Lupita Tovar and Paul Kohner, the star and the producer of the famous Universal Picture Spanish language version of "Dracula." She's also the mother of Chris Weitz and Paul Weitz, who wrote wrote some fine films including "In Good Company" and the new Star Wars film, "Rogue One." But back to the Sirk film, this is a true Hollywood classic that is a must see for all film fans!

  • Oct 13, 2016

    This is a a very well made melodrama from Douglas Sirk, who knew the genre well. It tells the story of a single mother, played by Lana Turner, who is a struggling actress that takes in a black widow and her young daughter who is very light skinned and often tries to pass for white. Through this set-up, Sirk is able to tackle several social topics including race, ambitions, and family relationships. The film is obviously very manipulative, but it is also well executed with admirable intentions. Two of the actresses were nominated for Supporting Actress Oscars. The film looks fantastic as well. It's an emotional journey well worth taking. Check it out.

    This is a a very well made melodrama from Douglas Sirk, who knew the genre well. It tells the story of a single mother, played by Lana Turner, who is a struggling actress that takes in a black widow and her young daughter who is very light skinned and often tries to pass for white. Through this set-up, Sirk is able to tackle several social topics including race, ambitions, and family relationships. The film is obviously very manipulative, but it is also well executed with admirable intentions. Two of the actresses were nominated for Supporting Actress Oscars. The film looks fantastic as well. It's an emotional journey well worth taking. Check it out.

  • Jun 20, 2016

    Lora Meredith is a struggling actress with a 6-year old daughter, Susie. She hires an African-American woman, Annie Johnson, as a maid. Annie has an 8-year old daughter, Sarah Jane, who instantly befriends Susie. Sarah Jane is light-skinned and does her best to pass herself as white at school and in social circles. This is to her advantage, due to the laws and social mores of the time. However, her mother is always quick to point out that Sarah Jane is her daughter, and this hinders her. Fast forward 10 years and Lora is now a Broadway star. An old flame, Steve Archer, has reappeared in her life and daughter Susie is smitten with him. Meanwhile Sarah Jane is trying to make her way in the world, socially and career-wise, but her idealistic, hard-headed, clingy mother is still embarrassing and hindering her. Well-intentioned and revolutionary for its time in that this movie tackles socially-entrenched racism. However, it is very clumsily told. Watching the movie, it is never plausible that Sarah Jane is black. The whole notion that, while passing off as white is an advantage, a mother would sabotage her daughter's attempts to be taken as white seems illogical. In addition, the daughter is portrayed as the villain of the piece, when she is just (legally) doing what she has to to get ahead. I can only think that the race angle was quite novel and powerful in 1959, thus it didn't really have to be too finely tuned to be interesting or plausible. By today's standards, however, it feels very contrived. The Susie-Steve Archer love angle was initially mildly interesting. It got irritating however when it persisted, as it really should just have been a passing, semi-humorous sub-plot, at best. The more that strand of the plot continued, the more annoyingly implausible and melodramatic it became, until it reached soap opera-like proportions. Overall, the clumsiness and melodrama overwhelm the anti-racism message, making the movie more miss than hit.

    Lora Meredith is a struggling actress with a 6-year old daughter, Susie. She hires an African-American woman, Annie Johnson, as a maid. Annie has an 8-year old daughter, Sarah Jane, who instantly befriends Susie. Sarah Jane is light-skinned and does her best to pass herself as white at school and in social circles. This is to her advantage, due to the laws and social mores of the time. However, her mother is always quick to point out that Sarah Jane is her daughter, and this hinders her. Fast forward 10 years and Lora is now a Broadway star. An old flame, Steve Archer, has reappeared in her life and daughter Susie is smitten with him. Meanwhile Sarah Jane is trying to make her way in the world, socially and career-wise, but her idealistic, hard-headed, clingy mother is still embarrassing and hindering her. Well-intentioned and revolutionary for its time in that this movie tackles socially-entrenched racism. However, it is very clumsily told. Watching the movie, it is never plausible that Sarah Jane is black. The whole notion that, while passing off as white is an advantage, a mother would sabotage her daughter's attempts to be taken as white seems illogical. In addition, the daughter is portrayed as the villain of the piece, when she is just (legally) doing what she has to to get ahead. I can only think that the race angle was quite novel and powerful in 1959, thus it didn't really have to be too finely tuned to be interesting or plausible. By today's standards, however, it feels very contrived. The Susie-Steve Archer love angle was initially mildly interesting. It got irritating however when it persisted, as it really should just have been a passing, semi-humorous sub-plot, at best. The more that strand of the plot continued, the more annoyingly implausible and melodramatic it became, until it reached soap opera-like proportions. Overall, the clumsiness and melodrama overwhelm the anti-racism message, making the movie more miss than hit.

  • May 30, 2016

    Beneath this unabashed tearjerker is an emotional cry of anger at the immorality of American racial intolerance and Hollywood depravity.

    Beneath this unabashed tearjerker is an emotional cry of anger at the immorality of American racial intolerance and Hollywood depravity.

  • May 09, 2016

    Mom's favorite movie.Watch every Mothers day

    Mom's favorite movie.Watch every Mothers day