The Invisible Man Reviews

  • Jan 12, 2020

    This is a wonderful classic that explores the fear of what can't be seen. This has wonderful acting and Claude Rains provided the perfect acting of an Invisible man. The special effects were stunning and the invisible man seemed more powerful and threatening than any other classic monster. This is some of the best that the horror genre can provide.

    This is a wonderful classic that explores the fear of what can't be seen. This has wonderful acting and Claude Rains provided the perfect acting of an Invisible man. The special effects were stunning and the invisible man seemed more powerful and threatening than any other classic monster. This is some of the best that the horror genre can provide.

  • Oct 30, 2019

    My favorite aspect of The Invisible Man is all of the special effects that they pulled off, considering the era the movie was made. The idea of a man you cannot see feels like a concept that they could have used to cut a lot of corners, because they don’t have to show anything and can just have people react as though someone invisible is there. There are a few moments like that in the film, and they are less impressive because they rely on the actors to sell that they are interacting with something we cannot see. But several times in the film they did some imaginative things that I’d be fascinated to read about in more detail, because I couldn’t even tell how they did it all with the technology available to them. The entire idea of an invisible danger is downright fascinating anyways. I like the threat that you cannot possibly see coming, and how that can be used to create scares. It also leads to some interesting thought process from the police and the other heroes as they try to think up methods of catching him without seeing him. If only the story had something more to it than that. The story of the characters is where I think The Invisible Man falls short. For one thing, it starts us in what would be late in the second act of a normal movie. The deed is done, the man is invisible, and he’s already trying to explore an antidote. Within mere minutes he is being sought by others, and starts threatening people and stripping down so he can hide. There isn’t character development to create sympathy for Claude Rains, he seems insane and evil from the early scenes. I also struggled with the fact that the serum that created this situation also drives him mad. That felt like an unnecessary addition to justify his actions. I think it would be far more interesting if nothing more than his struggles with being invisible drove him crazy. I think the concepts and some of the execution of The Invisible Man was strong, but this is the rare situation where I would say the film needs to be longer. With more time to build characters and develop the story, this could be a horror movie I enjoy.

    My favorite aspect of The Invisible Man is all of the special effects that they pulled off, considering the era the movie was made. The idea of a man you cannot see feels like a concept that they could have used to cut a lot of corners, because they don’t have to show anything and can just have people react as though someone invisible is there. There are a few moments like that in the film, and they are less impressive because they rely on the actors to sell that they are interacting with something we cannot see. But several times in the film they did some imaginative things that I’d be fascinated to read about in more detail, because I couldn’t even tell how they did it all with the technology available to them. The entire idea of an invisible danger is downright fascinating anyways. I like the threat that you cannot possibly see coming, and how that can be used to create scares. It also leads to some interesting thought process from the police and the other heroes as they try to think up methods of catching him without seeing him. If only the story had something more to it than that. The story of the characters is where I think The Invisible Man falls short. For one thing, it starts us in what would be late in the second act of a normal movie. The deed is done, the man is invisible, and he’s already trying to explore an antidote. Within mere minutes he is being sought by others, and starts threatening people and stripping down so he can hide. There isn’t character development to create sympathy for Claude Rains, he seems insane and evil from the early scenes. I also struggled with the fact that the serum that created this situation also drives him mad. That felt like an unnecessary addition to justify his actions. I think it would be far more interesting if nothing more than his struggles with being invisible drove him crazy. I think the concepts and some of the execution of The Invisible Man was strong, but this is the rare situation where I would say the film needs to be longer. With more time to build characters and develop the story, this could be a horror movie I enjoy.

  • Oct 25, 2019

    Universal Film's The Invisible Man, created in 1933, is a great film for its historical connections to the rise of evil powers in Europe and fears of the people during the Great Depression. It also is a great film for its amazing acting and great use of storytelling. During the 1930s, Europe was changing rapidly. Foreign powers, such as the National Socialist German Workers party, specifically Adolf Hitler in Germany in January, 1933 , and Joseph Stalin as dictator in Russia during the same year. The original story written by H.G Well takes place in Sussex, England, which the filmmakers kept as the setting for the movie, rather than changing it to be set in the United States. The Invisible man himself represents the powers of the Nazi party and the Communist party ravaging Europe, and causing chaos overall. The group that comes together to fight the invisible man most likely represent the people in the United States who felt that isolationism was a terrible idea and wanted to fight the foreign powers in Europe. During 1933, the United States was facing the Great Depression. People were afraid, with science starting to become more deadly, with the inventions of war machines and chemical warfare starting to become more and more popular with the military. People also feared the idea of insanity, especially with the invention of lobotomies for the mentally ill, which involved using needles and hammers to separate parts of the brain. Jack Griffin, the invisible man is a villain who is created by tampering with science, and eventually goes insane due to his meddling in the affairs of what should have been left alone. The Invisible Man in terms of artistic significance, has amazing acting, with Claude Rains as the titular character for one of his first on-screen roles. Time Magazine praised his performance, stating " Claude Rains gives an alarming performance, almost as frightening when he is present as when he is not.", a fitting thing to say for a role in a horror movie. Rains would go on to star in various movies, most important being Casablanca, which was heralded as the second greatest film of all time. The Invisible Man also has stellar storytelling.Based on the novel of the same name by H.G Wells, it stays faithful to the original story, with a few minor changes, most likely for the benefit of the audience. The author of the novel, H.G Wells stated that he liked the film, with his only problem with the movie was changing the character of Jack Griffin, changing him to be more sympathetic than an insane maniac right away. Mordaunt Hall of The New York Times wrote, "The story makes such superb cinematic material that one wonders that Hollywood did not film it sooner. Now that it has been done, it is a remarkable achievement.". Overall, The Invisible Man is an excellent film in terms of both historical and artistic significance.

    Universal Film's The Invisible Man, created in 1933, is a great film for its historical connections to the rise of evil powers in Europe and fears of the people during the Great Depression. It also is a great film for its amazing acting and great use of storytelling. During the 1930s, Europe was changing rapidly. Foreign powers, such as the National Socialist German Workers party, specifically Adolf Hitler in Germany in January, 1933 , and Joseph Stalin as dictator in Russia during the same year. The original story written by H.G Well takes place in Sussex, England, which the filmmakers kept as the setting for the movie, rather than changing it to be set in the United States. The Invisible man himself represents the powers of the Nazi party and the Communist party ravaging Europe, and causing chaos overall. The group that comes together to fight the invisible man most likely represent the people in the United States who felt that isolationism was a terrible idea and wanted to fight the foreign powers in Europe. During 1933, the United States was facing the Great Depression. People were afraid, with science starting to become more deadly, with the inventions of war machines and chemical warfare starting to become more and more popular with the military. People also feared the idea of insanity, especially with the invention of lobotomies for the mentally ill, which involved using needles and hammers to separate parts of the brain. Jack Griffin, the invisible man is a villain who is created by tampering with science, and eventually goes insane due to his meddling in the affairs of what should have been left alone. The Invisible Man in terms of artistic significance, has amazing acting, with Claude Rains as the titular character for one of his first on-screen roles. Time Magazine praised his performance, stating " Claude Rains gives an alarming performance, almost as frightening when he is present as when he is not.", a fitting thing to say for a role in a horror movie. Rains would go on to star in various movies, most important being Casablanca, which was heralded as the second greatest film of all time. The Invisible Man also has stellar storytelling.Based on the novel of the same name by H.G Wells, it stays faithful to the original story, with a few minor changes, most likely for the benefit of the audience. The author of the novel, H.G Wells stated that he liked the film, with his only problem with the movie was changing the character of Jack Griffin, changing him to be more sympathetic than an insane maniac right away. Mordaunt Hall of The New York Times wrote, "The story makes such superb cinematic material that one wonders that Hollywood did not film it sooner. Now that it has been done, it is a remarkable achievement.". Overall, The Invisible Man is an excellent film in terms of both historical and artistic significance.

  • Apr 25, 2019

    A great movie! One of my favorites!

    A great movie! One of my favorites!

  • Apr 05, 2019

    It’s amazing this movie is 90 years old and the special effects >>>> any CGI

    It’s amazing this movie is 90 years old and the special effects >>>> any CGI

  • Feb 19, 2019

    Wonderfully filmed, impressive special effects for the time, a fantastic performance from out main character, memorable monologues, and willingness to explain the science of the main plot make it a horror/monster movie classic.

    Wonderfully filmed, impressive special effects for the time, a fantastic performance from out main character, memorable monologues, and willingness to explain the science of the main plot make it a horror/monster movie classic.

  • Jan 16, 2019

    A great character study about one man's fall into madness.

    A great character study about one man's fall into madness.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    Actually Scary For A Movie Made Back Then!!!!!!

    Actually Scary For A Movie Made Back Then!!!!!!

  • Michael M Super Reviewer
    Nov 02, 2018

    More of a moral think piece than a horror movie, The Invisible Man is actually a damn fascinating story. Jumping right into things with Griffin already invisible, it shows the questioning of what would you do with this power and how far would it go to your head. Showcasing what were at the time some state-of-the-art effects and a shockingly thorough understanding of how paranoid you really would have to be when dealing with an invisible assailant, the chase for Griffin is really enjoyable to watch, as is his descent into madness. While it is a 30s film so some of the more graphic details of the invisible man are left out, you still get a pretty grim portrayal of the man. Not only that, it's a surprisingly funny film at times with a darkly goofy sense of humor. I really enjoyed it, and it got me interested in the premise and the other entries in the franchise.

    More of a moral think piece than a horror movie, The Invisible Man is actually a damn fascinating story. Jumping right into things with Griffin already invisible, it shows the questioning of what would you do with this power and how far would it go to your head. Showcasing what were at the time some state-of-the-art effects and a shockingly thorough understanding of how paranoid you really would have to be when dealing with an invisible assailant, the chase for Griffin is really enjoyable to watch, as is his descent into madness. While it is a 30s film so some of the more graphic details of the invisible man are left out, you still get a pretty grim portrayal of the man. Not only that, it's a surprisingly funny film at times with a darkly goofy sense of humor. I really enjoyed it, and it got me interested in the premise and the other entries in the franchise.

  • Oct 21, 2018

    The tackling of H.G. Wells' novel is compelling due to what kind of accurate effects are required and what kind of horror it would be, only to find piqued wonder in the early effects being carefully sharp and the sci-fi horror being a prompt of unseen fear with irrational and weird chaos. (B) (Full review TBD)

    The tackling of H.G. Wells' novel is compelling due to what kind of accurate effects are required and what kind of horror it would be, only to find piqued wonder in the early effects being carefully sharp and the sci-fi horror being a prompt of unseen fear with irrational and weird chaos. (B) (Full review TBD)