It's Alive Reviews

  • Apr 08, 2019

    It speaks to the enduring anxiety produced by the Oedipal relationship that the film is no less eerie for being satirical, filled with a slow-burning sense of terror and humor in equal measure. Yet whatever the natural absurdity of the supernatural circumstances on display, the feelings of unease and uncertainty that imbue the film are given weight by Herrmann's sublime score while being grounded by a set of performances that never admit to the insanity of everything around them, because both comedy and horror are best told with a straight face.

    It speaks to the enduring anxiety produced by the Oedipal relationship that the film is no less eerie for being satirical, filled with a slow-burning sense of terror and humor in equal measure. Yet whatever the natural absurdity of the supernatural circumstances on display, the feelings of unease and uncertainty that imbue the film are given weight by Herrmann's sublime score while being grounded by a set of performances that never admit to the insanity of everything around them, because both comedy and horror are best told with a straight face.

  • Oct 24, 2018

    Interesante obra de culto de género de la mano de una de las figuras más interesantes del cine: Larry Cohen. Y por supuesto con la magistral música de una grande como es Bernard Hermann. Escuchad nuestro episodio dedicado a ella: https://www.ivoox.com/terror-no-tiene-podcast-episodio-53-audios-mp3_rf_28987381_1.html

    Interesante obra de culto de género de la mano de una de las figuras más interesantes del cine: Larry Cohen. Y por supuesto con la magistral música de una grande como es Bernard Hermann. Escuchad nuestro episodio dedicado a ella: https://www.ivoox.com/terror-no-tiene-podcast-episodio-53-audios-mp3_rf_28987381_1.html

  • Sep 15, 2018

    What appears to be another 70's schlock creature feature on the surface is actually much more. Beyond the blood and guts there are some very real human terrors at large here.

    What appears to be another 70's schlock creature feature on the surface is actually much more. Beyond the blood and guts there are some very real human terrors at large here.

  • Jul 01, 2018

    a killer baby, its so stupid

    a killer baby, its so stupid

  • Jan 20, 2017

    Luv it. A campy B-movie that just won't quit, It looks like it was made of an $25,000 budget. Watch it, IF YOU DARE! It IS a little melodramatic.

    Luv it. A campy B-movie that just won't quit, It looks like it was made of an $25,000 budget. Watch it, IF YOU DARE! It IS a little melodramatic.

  • Jan 02, 2017

    A couple gives birth to a mutant baby that kills people when baby gets nervous! 70s horror not up to today's standards! kinda funny ! always so saw this on the self at video store when I was a kid the cover of movie sells but I didn't see it till it was tcm ? must of been a head of its time in 1974 !!

    A couple gives birth to a mutant baby that kills people when baby gets nervous! 70s horror not up to today's standards! kinda funny ! always so saw this on the self at video store when I was a kid the cover of movie sells but I didn't see it till it was tcm ? must of been a head of its time in 1974 !!

  • Nov 19, 2016

    Decent allegory about environmental poisoning and the effects it'll potentially have on people. And the alienation of having a child that's "different". Not much on the scares these days, but it's still an effective yarn.

    Decent allegory about environmental poisoning and the effects it'll potentially have on people. And the alienation of having a child that's "different". Not much on the scares these days, but it's still an effective yarn.

  • Oct 01, 2016

    Not bad for a B grade horror movie from the mid 70s. Some odd special effects. One odd scene where the three guys having a conversation seemed to teleport during the course of the conversation due to an odd editing decision. But enjoyable regardless.

    Not bad for a B grade horror movie from the mid 70s. Some odd special effects. One odd scene where the three guys having a conversation seemed to teleport during the course of the conversation due to an odd editing decision. But enjoyable regardless.

  • May 20, 2016

    This movie about a mutated newborn baby killing everything in sight is bad even by bad movie standards.

    This movie about a mutated newborn baby killing everything in sight is bad even by bad movie standards.

  • Sep 27, 2015

    Its title a nod to Dr. Frankensteinâ??s triumphant cry in James Whaleâ??s 1931 classic, Larry Cohenâ??s Itâ??s Alive may be the most discomforting filmic depiction of childbirth anxiety, parental responsibility and unconditional love Iâ??ve ever seen. Itâ??s also one of the all-time underrated horror movies, a deeply terrifying portrait of child-parent relationships and intolerant fears of â??othernessâ?? defined as much by its sociological sharpness as its gore. Proving to be Cohenâ??s first mainstream success, this tale of biological processes-gone-awry focuses on middle-class couple Frank (John P. Ryan) and Lenore Davis (Sharon Farrell), whose second child exits his motherâ??s body a mutated monster with murder on his mind. A physical manifestation both of its parentsâ?? corrosive hang-ups (specifically Frankâ??s selfish careerism and feelings of being â??trappedâ?? by kids) and public failings (environmental pollution, over-prescription of drugs), the â??babyâ?? immediately slays the attending doctors and nurses before fleeing into the neighborhood, where it becomes hunted by the police and Frank, the latter of whom loathes the notion that the thing shares with him common DNA. Crafted with superbly controlled widescreen compositions that, in the early hospital scenes, exhibit a distorted, fish lens-like surrealism, Cohenâ??s film â?? menacingly scored by Bernard Hermann â?? playfully (and discreetly) trades in infant/motherhood imagery, from the lactating milk truck attacked by the creature to the finaleâ??s womb-like underground L.A. sewer system. Yet what ultimately elevates Itâ??s Alive above being a piece of B-grade schlock (a designation unjustly used to define most of Cohenâ??s work) isnâ??t simply the writer/director/producerâ??s assured juggling of terror, comedy and social commentary; itâ??s also Ryanâ??s superbly bottled-up performance as the supernatural newbornâ??s distraught, disgusted and ultimately devoted daddy.

    Its title a nod to Dr. Frankensteinâ??s triumphant cry in James Whaleâ??s 1931 classic, Larry Cohenâ??s Itâ??s Alive may be the most discomforting filmic depiction of childbirth anxiety, parental responsibility and unconditional love Iâ??ve ever seen. Itâ??s also one of the all-time underrated horror movies, a deeply terrifying portrait of child-parent relationships and intolerant fears of â??othernessâ?? defined as much by its sociological sharpness as its gore. Proving to be Cohenâ??s first mainstream success, this tale of biological processes-gone-awry focuses on middle-class couple Frank (John P. Ryan) and Lenore Davis (Sharon Farrell), whose second child exits his motherâ??s body a mutated monster with murder on his mind. A physical manifestation both of its parentsâ?? corrosive hang-ups (specifically Frankâ??s selfish careerism and feelings of being â??trappedâ?? by kids) and public failings (environmental pollution, over-prescription of drugs), the â??babyâ?? immediately slays the attending doctors and nurses before fleeing into the neighborhood, where it becomes hunted by the police and Frank, the latter of whom loathes the notion that the thing shares with him common DNA. Crafted with superbly controlled widescreen compositions that, in the early hospital scenes, exhibit a distorted, fish lens-like surrealism, Cohenâ??s film â?? menacingly scored by Bernard Hermann â?? playfully (and discreetly) trades in infant/motherhood imagery, from the lactating milk truck attacked by the creature to the finaleâ??s womb-like underground L.A. sewer system. Yet what ultimately elevates Itâ??s Alive above being a piece of B-grade schlock (a designation unjustly used to define most of Cohenâ??s work) isnâ??t simply the writer/director/producerâ??s assured juggling of terror, comedy and social commentary; itâ??s also Ryanâ??s superbly bottled-up performance as the supernatural newbornâ??s distraught, disgusted and ultimately devoted daddy.