Kid Galahad Reviews

Page 1 of 5
flixsterman
Super Reviewer
½ January 17, 2009
Formulaic and completely predictable. Would have been nice to see Elvis get a substantial role in a substantial film once in a while. What a waste.
Super Reviewer
January 25, 2009
As long as you realize that Elvis movies are just a vehicle to put his singing butt on TV, you can enjoy the movie no matter how corny the story is.
jjnxn
Super Reviewer
½ August 16, 2007
the original is far superior in all aspects but for an elvis movie this one isn't bad.
Super Reviewer
½ March 4, 2008
One of his better movies.
June 27, 2010
Elvis in one of his best performances in this action-musical, where Elvis is an undefeated boxer and in the last fight is an all out slugfest, and also great performance by Charles Bronson in a movie I never thought he would do.
January 1, 2009
I love Elvis movies. This creates a whole new setting with a pretty good story. Its fun to just enjoy these movies.
½ August 15, 2007
oh elvis. lol that's all i gotta say....

"if that walked in my door i'd be happy too" -my sister said that one lolol
½ October 23, 2010
Mildly entertaining slow paced film about a come from nowhere champion boxer. While Elvis doesn't sing near as much in this one as so many other films, its a relief.

Seeing Elvis take a punch dozens of time in his early boxing debut is hard to take. He gets better as the film goes on, thankfully. Elvis comes home after being discharged fromt he army to return home broke at a sleepy mountain resort town of Cream Valley.

While his knack for fixing cars is astounding, his hometown doesn't need him as a mechanic. Lucky for him his first employer runs a boxing camp and a resort. Oscar winner Gig Young (They Shoot Horses Don't They) plays the angry boxing promotor and normally tough guy Charles Bronson (Dirty Dozen, The Mechanic, Mr. Majestic) plays Elvis' traier.

Watching Gig Young get angry at varions times in this film is so out of character. Elvis the boxer hangs around long enough to want to marry his daughter, which sends Gig through the roof.

Elvis Presley, well what more can we say about singers who make movies? It's happened so many times before and since that singers normally just can't act, except for Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and maybe a few others. But to the credit of this lightweight drama Elvis isn't asked to sing dozens of no hit songs through the film.

#37 on the list of the top-grossing movies of 1962.

Directed by Phil Karlson
Produced by David Weisbart
Written by Francis Wallace (story)

Starring
Elvis Presley (Kid Galahad)
Lola Albright
Gig Young (boxing promotor)
Joan Blackman
Charles Bronson (boxing trainer)

Music by Jeff Alexander
Cinematography Burnett Guffey
Editing by Stuart Gilmore
Studio The Mirisch Company
Distributed by United Artists
Release date(s) August 11, 1962
Running time 95 min.
½ August 28, 2004
Best in Show: Elvis Presley
One for the future: n/a
Stand-out scene: Elvis sparring in closely-fitting blue shorts
Brainer or no-brainer: Brainer
Stands up to one viewing or repeated?: Repeated
DVD commentary any good?: n/a

DVD
Can't recall this ever having been shown on TV and I'd certainly never seen it before my mom got me this for 60p through a newspaper offer. Surprisingly one of the better Elvis films (despite it's non-appearance TV wise) it's certainly an improvement on say Clambake and Frankie & Johnny but not up to the standard of say, King Creole. His tenth movie, it follows the formula employed for the vast majority of Elvis films; new boy in town sweeps girl off her feet with half a dozen or so ditties thrown in for good (or bad) measure. This time, playing a character called Walter (swiftly dropped in favour of 'Kid Galahad') he's a recently demobbed army man as handy with a wrench as his fists blessed with the ability to take a series of punches before delivering a decisive knockout blow. A young(er) Charles Bronson figures amongst the cast surrounding a brown-haired Elvis, who not only has several scenes wearing closely-fitting blue shorts, but also is tastily clad in denim for a number of sequences. Yum.
Page 1 of 5