The Legacy Reviews

  • Oct 30, 2018

    Katharine Ross plays a woman going to London with her partner (played by Sam Elliott at his homoerotic best) for a job interview. Whilst riding on a motorbike in the countryside surrounding London they are almost crashed into by a Rolls Royce. The owner apologises and, as their bike has been damaged, they are put up for the weekend at his huge country mansion. But then things start to turn weird. Very weird. There seems to be a fair few films from the 70's which prompt me to think 'What the...' when I see them. The pinnacle of this sub-genre (lets call it 'Cocaine was involved') is The Exorcist 2: The Heretic. Whilst The Legacy doesn't reach that film's dizzying heights of coke-fuelled weirdness (and no other film does), it does still deliver to such as extent that viewers' eyes will be popping out of their skulls at some scenes. Wanna see Roger Daltry get a trachioctomy on top of a banquet table? Wanna see the guy who played Blofeld (Charles Gray, not Donald Pleasance) being supernaturally burnt to a crisp? Sure you do! And lets not forget the demonically possessed swimming pool and shower.  It will help to be stoned whilst watching this movie. The film will only make perfect sense this way.

    Katharine Ross plays a woman going to London with her partner (played by Sam Elliott at his homoerotic best) for a job interview. Whilst riding on a motorbike in the countryside surrounding London they are almost crashed into by a Rolls Royce. The owner apologises and, as their bike has been damaged, they are put up for the weekend at his huge country mansion. But then things start to turn weird. Very weird. There seems to be a fair few films from the 70's which prompt me to think 'What the...' when I see them. The pinnacle of this sub-genre (lets call it 'Cocaine was involved') is The Exorcist 2: The Heretic. Whilst The Legacy doesn't reach that film's dizzying heights of coke-fuelled weirdness (and no other film does), it does still deliver to such as extent that viewers' eyes will be popping out of their skulls at some scenes. Wanna see Roger Daltry get a trachioctomy on top of a banquet table? Wanna see the guy who played Blofeld (Charles Gray, not Donald Pleasance) being supernaturally burnt to a crisp? Sure you do! And lets not forget the demonically possessed swimming pool and shower.  It will help to be stoned whilst watching this movie. The film will only make perfect sense this way.

  • May 07, 2017

    Dopey 70's horror with a few fun moments but more or less feels like a pale imitation of 70's Italian horror films; which in themselves are imitations Of 70's American horror films.

    Dopey 70's horror with a few fun moments but more or less feels like a pale imitation of 70's Italian horror films; which in themselves are imitations Of 70's American horror films.

  • Nov 11, 2016

    A truly unmemorable and dreary horror film. The odd moment or two kept me hanging in but there are far, far better examples of this type of mysterious house horror out there. Steer clear and watch any episode of Hammer House Of Horror instead!

    A truly unmemorable and dreary horror film. The odd moment or two kept me hanging in but there are far, far better examples of this type of mysterious house horror out there. Steer clear and watch any episode of Hammer House Of Horror instead!

  • Apr 24, 2016

    More mysterious than creepy, it's an effective haunted house horror.

    More mysterious than creepy, it's an effective haunted house horror.

  • Oct 04, 2015

    Great atmosphere and house setting. The kills are pretty good, but spread out a bit thin. The disco music is so out of place, but I loved it. Most of the issues with the movie were how generic and uninteresting it was. It was really nothing special and predictable.

    Great atmosphere and house setting. The kills are pretty good, but spread out a bit thin. The disco music is so out of place, but I loved it. Most of the issues with the movie were how generic and uninteresting it was. It was really nothing special and predictable.

  • Avatar
    Cory T Super Reviewer
    Sep 30, 2015

    The cover artwork is a hissing cat hovering over witch's fingernails and the assumption of supernatural chicanery isn't entirely unfounded. While this occult thriller can be lumbering and devoid of shivers, it is nevertheless ticklish, byzantine escapism. Frankly, the bait-and-switch of Margaret (Katharine Ross) and Pete's (Sam Elliott) swooning romance (with picnics along the English countryside) is a convincingly tranquil slice of Nicolas Sparks infatuation. Lending his mustache and swaggering macho gravitas to the cryptic proceedings, the seethingly paranoid Elliott scowls at the slightest hint of conspiracy (his glance is askew at an astronomical advance sum for their interior design overseas). Richard Marquand sprinkles a breadcrumb trail of oddities and red herrings (ex. A fully furnished bedroom upon the couple's inopportune arrival). A gratuitously titillating shower scene for the ladies of Elliott is interrupted by scolding hot water. Known mostly for the band The Who, Roger Daltry doesn't outstrip himself of his rock-star image and his character, Clive, might as well be vacationing during an international musical tour. Either way, kudos to the script for not skimping on its own cockamamie nature. The ring being bequeathed to Maggie is undeniably frightening with the disembodied voice of Jason Mountolive beckoning from behind a hospital veil. Although, Mountolive's decrepit makeup is eerily similar to Troma's Toxic Avenger. Neither Maggie nor Peter are nonplused by accumulating loopy behavior and it only supports the tongue-in-cheek attitude. At one point, Elliott is nearly struck by an errant crossbow arrow and he remarks, in his typically baritone manner, "Maybe you should stick to darts". The major component that propels the film to modest success is the jaunty chemistry between real-life duo, Elliott and Ross. The whodunit aspects are transparent to a fault but it doesn't treat black magic and Satanism with direness. Daltry's recruitment speech to the dark arts is quite flippant in a Monty Python way ("It's a different way of life really. We don't ride on broomsticks."). By the ending credits, the prophesy has been fulfilled and those still intact are not merely grateful but surprisingly felicitous about the possibilities of the heir's powers. On its own ingratiating merits, The Legacy is a lighthearted romp in devil worship.

    The cover artwork is a hissing cat hovering over witch's fingernails and the assumption of supernatural chicanery isn't entirely unfounded. While this occult thriller can be lumbering and devoid of shivers, it is nevertheless ticklish, byzantine escapism. Frankly, the bait-and-switch of Margaret (Katharine Ross) and Pete's (Sam Elliott) swooning romance (with picnics along the English countryside) is a convincingly tranquil slice of Nicolas Sparks infatuation. Lending his mustache and swaggering macho gravitas to the cryptic proceedings, the seethingly paranoid Elliott scowls at the slightest hint of conspiracy (his glance is askew at an astronomical advance sum for their interior design overseas). Richard Marquand sprinkles a breadcrumb trail of oddities and red herrings (ex. A fully furnished bedroom upon the couple's inopportune arrival). A gratuitously titillating shower scene for the ladies of Elliott is interrupted by scolding hot water. Known mostly for the band The Who, Roger Daltry doesn't outstrip himself of his rock-star image and his character, Clive, might as well be vacationing during an international musical tour. Either way, kudos to the script for not skimping on its own cockamamie nature. The ring being bequeathed to Maggie is undeniably frightening with the disembodied voice of Jason Mountolive beckoning from behind a hospital veil. Although, Mountolive's decrepit makeup is eerily similar to Troma's Toxic Avenger. Neither Maggie nor Peter are nonplused by accumulating loopy behavior and it only supports the tongue-in-cheek attitude. At one point, Elliott is nearly struck by an errant crossbow arrow and he remarks, in his typically baritone manner, "Maybe you should stick to darts". The major component that propels the film to modest success is the jaunty chemistry between real-life duo, Elliott and Ross. The whodunit aspects are transparent to a fault but it doesn't treat black magic and Satanism with direness. Daltry's recruitment speech to the dark arts is quite flippant in a Monty Python way ("It's a different way of life really. We don't ride on broomsticks."). By the ending credits, the prophesy has been fulfilled and those still intact are not merely grateful but surprisingly felicitous about the possibilities of the heir's powers. On its own ingratiating merits, The Legacy is a lighthearted romp in devil worship.

  • Jan 09, 2015

    I remember this from the early days of HBO circa 1980. It has enough unique twists to make it worth seeing.

    I remember this from the early days of HBO circa 1980. It has enough unique twists to make it worth seeing.

  • Dec 17, 2013

    I think the English countryside goes a helluva long way towards selling this one, as a young American couple travel there and become trapped on the estate, where increasingly bizarre deaths take place. Fun stuff, a nice quiet way to kill a lazy Saturday afternoon.

    I think the English countryside goes a helluva long way towards selling this one, as a young American couple travel there and become trapped on the estate, where increasingly bizarre deaths take place. Fun stuff, a nice quiet way to kill a lazy Saturday afternoon.

  • Aug 04, 2013

    Strange Goings On In The Middle of Nowhere--Death rites of Satan's riches!!

    Strange Goings On In The Middle of Nowhere--Death rites of Satan's riches!!

  • Feb 18, 2011

    Despite featuring a compelling premise, Roger Daltrey, and Sam Elliott, The Legacy ultimately fell flat for me. It was a boring, derivative horror film that never lives up to its promise. Its supernatural thrills and death scenes are tired and tame even by 78 standards. Perhaps worthy of a laugh-fest midnight movie screening, The Legacy is not enjoyable for much else.

    Despite featuring a compelling premise, Roger Daltrey, and Sam Elliott, The Legacy ultimately fell flat for me. It was a boring, derivative horror film that never lives up to its promise. Its supernatural thrills and death scenes are tired and tame even by 78 standards. Perhaps worthy of a laugh-fest midnight movie screening, The Legacy is not enjoyable for much else.