A Man for All Seasons - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

A Man for All Seasons Reviews

Page 1 of 36
November 22, 2016
I think this is a classic. Watched it for the first time and had that kind of majestic feeling afterward.
September 12, 2016
This 1966 adaptation of Robert Bolt's play is an intellectual film about the Church and politics, brought to life with entertaining performances and superb photography.
July 23, 2016
Saw this cinematic masterpiece again a few days ago after seeing it on the big screen 12 years ago. Essential filmmaking study...Iconic Oscar winning example of classic 60s international cinema. Robert Bolt, who wrote The Mission, another exceptional period piece with Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons, penned this classic. Follows tensions created between Henry VIII, played by the great Robert Shaw, and his boy the chancellor, Sir Thomas Moore, acted by the Oscar winning beast Paul Scofield. You assuredly missed the fact that John Hurt, who plays the sorry pussy ass coward, Richard Rich, is in fact the same gimp who would have that little alien BURST out of his gut in Ridley Scott's, Alien. Great cinematography by Ted Moore. They don't make them like that anymore.
July 18, 2016
It has its merits on the performances and cinematography that's agreeable, but however, those qualities were the film's only offers at a small value when the it's just plain boredom from being tedious - at such the slowest pace as possible - and not inviting a lot of audience that aren't familiar to the story besides its Best Picture title. It's an ultimate sleeping pill than "2001: A Space Odyssey." (B-)

(Requires another viewing)
May 17, 2016
A Man for All Seasons (1966) ????
One of the greatest movies ever made, an honest, knockout drama (arguably Zinnemann's best film) about Thomas More, who stood up to King Henry VIII when the king rejected the Roman Catholic Church to obtain a divorce and remarriage, while also (subtlety) keeping his relationship with God in check. Vivid, fiercely though-provoking, with superb, fascinating dialogue, characterizations; breathtakingly beautiful in every way, plus haunting finale. Well-deserved Oscar wins for Screenplay (Robert Bolt) and for Scofield's unforgettable performance in leading role. Picture, Director, Photography, and Costumes also won. A truly wonderful motion picture.
½ March 9, 2016
It's enjoyable to say the least.
December 23, 2015
A drama around a controversial issue about justice.
November 11, 2015
I finally saw Fred Zinnemann's "A Man For All Seasons," which won six Oscars in 1966, including Best Picture, Director and Actor. It won all these Oscars for the same reason that "How Green Was My Valley" bested "Citizen Kane" and "Forrest Gump" bested "Pulp Fiction." Hollywood prefers to honor formula over innovation. "A Man For A Seasons" boasts immaculate production values, a deeply moral script and a letter perfect cast lead by an unknown British stage actor that originated the role. Like Ben Kingsley as Ghandi, the role of Thomas More would define Paul Scofield, who won the Best Actor Oscar over Richard Burton in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" Scofield had internalized the role, but Burton lived his, and acted circles around Scofield. But Hollywood prefers to honor heroes and martyrs over deeply flawed individuals. Oscar's snubbing of director Mike Nichols and Richard Burton showed that Hollywood could not handle the Truth. Robert Bolt's screenplay may stand as a flawless morality play, but it's still Golden Age Hollywood, with real emotions buried under Victorian manners and layers of costuming. It won because it was expected to win, just as all the Merchant & Ivory films won because they were expected to. But that does not mean it deserved to win.
October 17, 2015
A majestic film, not only a biographical film but also a courtroom drama. Sir Thomas More is the kind of man that is hard to find nowadays, a man loyal to his principles. Sir Thomas More did a legal and moral exposition that is a master piece on reasoning.
½ September 22, 2015
"I do none harm, I say none harm, I think none harm. And if this be not enough to keep a man alive, in good faith I long not to live"....Thomas More
½ July 26, 2015
I am very surprised my uncle was the first source from which I heard about this film - it seems like it should be much more famous than it is. It won the academy award for Best Picture of 1966, and it co- stars famous actors Orson Welles, Robert Shaw, and John Hurt. The strongest aspects of this film are the writing and performances; combined, these two elements form a great movie.

Not mentioned above, Paul Scofield, who I have never heard of prior to seeing this film, carries this film with a brilliant performance. He plays Thomas More, a man defiant to man's law if God's law says differently. This is the essence of his personality, and he is a character who is full of wisdom and a great sense of logic in order to defend himself against the accusations of the corrupt. While his wisdom and logic do not ultimately save him, these characteristics form one of the most inspirational characters I have ever seen on film. Scofield plays More as a man who calmly accepts his fate while standing by his words and beliefs, rather than pleading his allegiance to the corruption within England's government.

The supporting cast - especially John Hurt - do a good job of building up More even more (pun not intended) by portraying corrupt individuals who More has tried to help. More always has the best intentions; John Hurt's character is looking for employment at the beginning of the film, and More tries to convince him to become a teacher to avoid the corruption of government, and offers him a bribe he has received in order to get the man started. At first it seems possible that Hurt's character will remain loyal to More, but instead uses the fact that he was "bribed" by More to obtain a post within the government. It is heartbreaking to listen to Hurt's character lie about More late in the film in order to just keep climbing up the ladder, a situation More was trying to prevent entirely for the best intentions.

Most of the film consists of inspiring monologues through More, an aspect I love since I think monologues are difficult to pull off correctly and are extremely effective in developing character. Scofield does it with mastery. I think it makes sense that this work stems from a play because I see it more fitting to be performed on stage than I see it as a cinematic work. If the film was more cinematic I would give it a perfect rating, but to me the only really visually captivating scene in the film was the penultimate scene: the trial for More's life. As my uncle says, in a way, this film makes you "want to be a better person."
June 20, 2015
I learned... but way too historical for me...
April 26, 2015
An all time great movie.
April 25, 2015
A Man for All Seasons is a good lesson in British history, however I'm not much of a history buff. Paul Scofield portrays Sir Thomas More with a quiet dignity that I hope to have when faced with adversity. It was also very interesting to see Robert Shaw play someone other than an Irish crime boss or a gruff shark hunter. I liked it, but this movie is definitely more educational than entertaining.
April 13, 2015
Starring Paul Scofield, Wendy Hiller and Robert Shaw. Riveting story of Sir Thomas More (Scofield, reprising his stage role) who sacrificed his life standing up for his principles. He refused to offer the Church's consent to the divorce and remarriage of King Henry VIII (Shaw) and was executed as a result. Fred Zinnemann has done a great job of opening up the play for cinematic purposes, and his film is beautifully photographed. Blink and you'll miss cameo appearances by Orson Welles as Cardinal Wolsey (whom More replaced), and Vanessa Redgrave (in a non-speaking role) as Anne Boleyn. Wendy Hiller, often misused on film, gets a rare chance to shine as More's wife Alice.
March 17, 2015
This film has s beautiful message that should be noticed, pondered on, and then incorporated into each and every person's life. Even the smallest scenes and seemingly unimportant dialogue are powerful and shows the importance of words and incorporating the knowledge of the good in a person's every day actions. The value of life and the dignity of every person protected under the law is something that our country has failed to uphold on many occasions. Our response to it should be exactly as Scofield portrays in this film, as upholding our own life as the example and defense of human dignity. In my opinion Scofield and Zinnemann have recaptured the timeless values that we take for granted in the life of this saint. They also point at the dangers of not taking the law and government as something that we are a part of and may affect our conscious. I would recommend this movie to anyone that is seeking a way of living out truth in their lives.
March 7, 2015
beautifully filmed and superbly acted
December 5, 2014
This film is more than an adaptation, a poem. about honesty as axis of existence. about truth as rule of each reaction. a movie about a single man, his war and his profound sacrifice. one of great realistic portraits of Thomas More. And excellent point for understand Utopia more than a fictionally society. sure, the director, the cast, the bleak Orson Welles are fabulous. music, images, each detail are precious. but the profound virtue is final taste. not a moral lesson. not illustration of a tragedy. only a testimony. about real way to make politic. and power to remain yourself. a beautiful work in all senses. wise, delicate and ironic, tender, cruel and good occasion to discover the essence of Christianity. a masterpiece. far from definitions or series. a love declaration, very powerful, very lucid to justice. drawing of pure faith.This is a film I can heartily recommend.
November 10, 2014
One of the best character studies on film and one of my favorite movies ever. Beautifully filmed, wonderfully cast with a fantastic script. Many people mistake this for a religious film but it is not; in fact, Robert Bolt was reportedly an agnostic. This (like a similarly mistakenly "religious" film, "Chariots of Fire") is about people sticking to their principles regardless of where they are derived.
September 15, 2014
A great movie for those interested in the English Reformation or history in general. This classic presents a very sympathetic view of Thomas More's struggle to remain faithful to the King and to the Church.

Overall, an enjoyable movie. But it definitely would seem slow when compared to the pace of films in the twenty-first century.
Page 1 of 36