The Mummy Reviews

  • Oct 15, 2020

    Dark and mysterious even today. Karl Freund's mystical horror picture The Mummy (1932) is another Universal classic monster movie. Freund's dark direction is worthy of his impressive atmospheric cinematography for Dracula the previous year. Freund takes the bleak outlook and grim shadowy shots from Dracula and puts them up to the test against The Mummy with an eerie feel to this creature feature. John L. Balderston, Richard Schayer, and Nina Wilcox Putnam's writing is very interesting with a strange story based on Egyptian faith and curses that sees a mummy rise again to seek out his lost love regardless of who is in his way. It's scary, but quite thoughtful, especially for 1932 standards. Boris Karloff is interesting as The Mummy with his slow steps and disturbing past. Karloff is particularly engaging as the humanized mummy Imhotep. His deep voice and dire look are quite compelling all these years later. Zita Zohann is fun as Helen and captivating as the princess possessed by The Mummy's lover from a past life. She is half the movie really and the actual hero of The Mummy. David Manners is likable enough as Frank Whemple in his sincere heroism. Arthur Byron is good on a dramatic level as Sir Joseph Whemple. I really like the gravitas Edward Van Sloan brings to Dr. Muller. His voice and urgency fit The Mummy nicely. Milton Carruth's clever cuts keeps The Mummy down to a very brief and succinctly edited 73 minutes. It feels even shorter than that really as it's all story and action simultaneously. Charles J. Stumar's cinematography gets these excellent close-up shots of Karloff's intense eyes like he's Dracula that works well. His wide shots of rooms are very intriguing as you focus on the people, but feel like the room's ambiance is still present with them. Willy Pogany's art direction is as dark as you'd expect from a Universal picture from the early 30's. James Dietrich's score is powerful and grim with a soft edge surrounding the emotional scenes. Vera West does a fantastic job of the period costumes and the mummy outfit with bandages galore. Jack Pierce's make-up is unholy for The Mummy with creepy old age make-up and worn mummy appearances in every scene. In conclusion, Karl Freund did a phenomenal job directing The Mummy as it's just as good as Dracula or Frankenstein.

    Dark and mysterious even today. Karl Freund's mystical horror picture The Mummy (1932) is another Universal classic monster movie. Freund's dark direction is worthy of his impressive atmospheric cinematography for Dracula the previous year. Freund takes the bleak outlook and grim shadowy shots from Dracula and puts them up to the test against The Mummy with an eerie feel to this creature feature. John L. Balderston, Richard Schayer, and Nina Wilcox Putnam's writing is very interesting with a strange story based on Egyptian faith and curses that sees a mummy rise again to seek out his lost love regardless of who is in his way. It's scary, but quite thoughtful, especially for 1932 standards. Boris Karloff is interesting as The Mummy with his slow steps and disturbing past. Karloff is particularly engaging as the humanized mummy Imhotep. His deep voice and dire look are quite compelling all these years later. Zita Zohann is fun as Helen and captivating as the princess possessed by The Mummy's lover from a past life. She is half the movie really and the actual hero of The Mummy. David Manners is likable enough as Frank Whemple in his sincere heroism. Arthur Byron is good on a dramatic level as Sir Joseph Whemple. I really like the gravitas Edward Van Sloan brings to Dr. Muller. His voice and urgency fit The Mummy nicely. Milton Carruth's clever cuts keeps The Mummy down to a very brief and succinctly edited 73 minutes. It feels even shorter than that really as it's all story and action simultaneously. Charles J. Stumar's cinematography gets these excellent close-up shots of Karloff's intense eyes like he's Dracula that works well. His wide shots of rooms are very intriguing as you focus on the people, but feel like the room's ambiance is still present with them. Willy Pogany's art direction is as dark as you'd expect from a Universal picture from the early 30's. James Dietrich's score is powerful and grim with a soft edge surrounding the emotional scenes. Vera West does a fantastic job of the period costumes and the mummy outfit with bandages galore. Jack Pierce's make-up is unholy for The Mummy with creepy old age make-up and worn mummy appearances in every scene. In conclusion, Karl Freund did a phenomenal job directing The Mummy as it's just as good as Dracula or Frankenstein.

  • Sep 24, 2020

    Memorable more for its influence, makeup, and lighting than anything to do with the plot or performances (apart from Karloff's take on the less animalistic, more devious Imhotep); the film itself really is taken in large part from that of Dracula, whose adaptation a few years prior brought popular acclaim but largely fails to excite today (monster with a fantastical element wants femme fatale, is fought by a group of old intellectuals in a bizarrely unenergetic manner, and is ultimately defeated). Still, bears worth for its influence on popular culture and film, if not for what it is objectively. (3/5)

    Memorable more for its influence, makeup, and lighting than anything to do with the plot or performances (apart from Karloff's take on the less animalistic, more devious Imhotep); the film itself really is taken in large part from that of Dracula, whose adaptation a few years prior brought popular acclaim but largely fails to excite today (monster with a fantastical element wants femme fatale, is fought by a group of old intellectuals in a bizarrely unenergetic manner, and is ultimately defeated). Still, bears worth for its influence on popular culture and film, if not for what it is objectively. (3/5)

  • Sep 24, 2020

    This was always my least favorite of the classic monster films. It's a rich mythology, with another great performance from Karloff, in an interesting and tragic love story. It just kind of drags... like the mummy's foot.

    This was always my least favorite of the classic monster films. It's a rich mythology, with another great performance from Karloff, in an interesting and tragic love story. It just kind of drags... like the mummy's foot.

  • Aug 16, 2020

    Great atmosphere and an interesting plot make this film as well as an iconic performance from Boris Karloff make this film a classic.

    Great atmosphere and an interesting plot make this film as well as an iconic performance from Boris Karloff make this film a classic.

  • May 22, 2020

    With old suspense, glamour, and Boris Karloff's nearly unmoving face, you get the feeling of a cold hand wrapped around your neck.

    With old suspense, glamour, and Boris Karloff's nearly unmoving face, you get the feeling of a cold hand wrapped around your neck.

  • Mar 25, 2020

    Great make up and brilliant cinematography. This original classic is a must see for classic monster fans. It's not based on any litterary source. It's a simple story but one which is just as romantic as it is spooky. It's a love story that spanned thousands of years. The acting is good considering the date. When in this era many had a habit of over-acting. The dialogue is not very notable. I find it hard to remember any lines of this film. Boris Karloff is the main reason to watch. He is brilliant as Imhotep. The screen presence Karloff possesses cant be ignored. The music at the start gives it that eerie dream-like quality. The same music that Dracula (1931) uses I believe. All in all, it's a must watch of classic (universal) horror. Although you do need to be in the right mood and environment to really get in the mood to watch it. It requires a suspension of disbelief.

    Great make up and brilliant cinematography. This original classic is a must see for classic monster fans. It's not based on any litterary source. It's a simple story but one which is just as romantic as it is spooky. It's a love story that spanned thousands of years. The acting is good considering the date. When in this era many had a habit of over-acting. The dialogue is not very notable. I find it hard to remember any lines of this film. Boris Karloff is the main reason to watch. He is brilliant as Imhotep. The screen presence Karloff possesses cant be ignored. The music at the start gives it that eerie dream-like quality. The same music that Dracula (1931) uses I believe. All in all, it's a must watch of classic (universal) horror. Although you do need to be in the right mood and environment to really get in the mood to watch it. It requires a suspension of disbelief.

  • Nov 20, 2019

    Mejor estuvo la versiòn de los 90s

    Mejor estuvo la versiòn de los 90s

  • Cory G
    Jul 30, 2019

    The Mummy taps into a certain joy for adventure that even 20 years later has audiences selling out theaters. Its a pure cinematic journey. Time for a proper Mummy 4 with Stephen Sommers & Brendan Fraser.

    The Mummy taps into a certain joy for adventure that even 20 years later has audiences selling out theaters. Its a pure cinematic journey. Time for a proper Mummy 4 with Stephen Sommers & Brendan Fraser.

  • Jamie
    Jul 29, 2019

    This is my favorite movie because of the action scenes and the music is absolutely beautiful I highly recommend checking this out

    This is my favorite movie because of the action scenes and the music is absolutely beautiful I highly recommend checking this out

  • Jun 03, 2019

    After the one GREAT scene at the beginning of the movie when Karloff is resurrected, the rest of the movie is quite pedestrian. Worth seeing for its iconography, but to me the weakest of the Universal monster movies so far.

    After the one GREAT scene at the beginning of the movie when Karloff is resurrected, the rest of the movie is quite pedestrian. Worth seeing for its iconography, but to me the weakest of the Universal monster movies so far.