The Mummy - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Mummy Reviews

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½ October 26, 2016
Sluggish and not interesting, it has a few nice sets (and quite a few ludicrous ones) but zero atmosphere. Cushing is endearing as ever but here, Lee is strangely drab. There's not much of a shine to the whole proceeding, accentuated by a score that veers on absurd. The structure wants to be innovative but all it achieves is killing all momentum. I love 1950's horror but this is not a good one (remember that on rotten tomatoes, a 100% can also merely mean that 100% of the critics didnt find it actively bad; it doesnt mean they found it that good).
September 7, 2016
Lee and Cushing are firing on all cylinders here. Following The Curse of Frankenstein and The Horror of Dracula, this is the third time they crossed paths in a Hammer flick. Lee brings a moody presence as our villain and Cushing plays a very heroic part; unexpected for those used to him as Baron Von Frankenstein or Grand Moff Tarkin in the original Star Wars.
September 6, 2016
If only it was om blue ray 3D
February 26, 2016
Creature design is nice. Boring movie though. The original is way better.
½ February 9, 2016
Not as masterful as Hammer's adaptations of Dracula or Frankenstein, but pretty good on its own, especially with Cushing and Lee at the head of the cast.
½ February 8, 2016
A bit dull and repetitive, but not terrible.
October 31, 2015
Solid Cushing/Lee Hammer horror film with great performances and stunning set pieces, but the pacing and writing are as a slow as a mummy on this one.
½ October 24, 2015
Terrific Hammer production !! A remake of the 1932 black and white Boris Karloff classic, This movie is really good, the strong performance by Peter Cushing as the main character and Christopher Lee as the Mummy, and filmed in beautiful Technicolor. This movie is not lose of your time. Recommended !!
½ September 11, 2015
another great Christopher Lee film.
½ August 30, 2015
One of Hammer's first efforts to remake and remodel the earlier Universal Horror pictures (after their success with Dracula and Frankenstein) is a typically well-dressed production that evokes both ancient Egypt and late Victorian England. Peter Cushing is the son of a famous archaeologist along on the trip when his dad finds the tomb of Princess Ananka and reads the scroll of life to accidentally awaken the guardian mummy Kharis. Well, in this version of the tale, Kharis is transported by a sympathetic Egyptian, loyal to the local deity, back to England where he stalks and kills those involved in the expedition. Christopher Lee is suitably gruesome/scary (more so than Karloff) as the mummy in question and the whole thing holds up pretty well. Of course, one has to wonder whether any remake today could be so insensitive to the rights of indigenous people to their own cultural artefacts and particularly to their dead. But then again, the film takes place in an unenlightened time (and perhaps the 1950s were too). Of course, that's why they were cursed by The Mummy!
½ June 22, 2015
Goofy, but sincere. The Mummy really gets started around the half-way mark, but once it does its becomes classic Hammer fair!
½ May 17, 2015
Acting as both a remake and a tribute to the Universal Mummy franchise, this one looks great but doesn't really deliver anything new from those before it. Great characters, Lee as the Mummy and its makeup are both wonderful, and there are some really nice artful scenes. The storyline isn't new, but it's still pretty fulfilling and entertaining.
½ March 30, 2015
I mean no disrespect to Lee as an actor, but this is my favorite performance from him. Besides his voice, his intense eyes are his most notable feature and they get many emotional close-ups in this movie.
January 24, 2015
Lo mejor la momia llevando a la chica al pantano, recordaba esa escena cuando la ví de niño, pensé que era la criatura del lago.
½ January 22, 2015
Lo mejor la momia llevando a la chica al pantano, recordaba esa escena cuando la ví de niño, pensé que era la criatura del lago.
½ November 4, 2014
Like the two previous Hammer Horror films, The Mummy sets up a really good atmosphere, but in many ways, this one is inferior to the rest. The story, for instance, is quite predictable, especially because the film uses the same two lead actors as the other two Hammer Horror films. The performances are actually pretty good, but they aren't really as impressive as the performances boasted on Dracula, especially since the film itself seems to be made in the same fashion as Dracula, perhaps exploiting the formula that made the previous films such a success when they were new. That being said, the visuals still look pretty good for the time the film was made, and the atmosphere is constructed pretty well. On the other hand, the film, while still enjoyable, seems ultimately inadequate next to its predecessors, perhaps because it repeats some of the tropes present in the previous films.
½ May 25, 2014
This is a pretty decent version of the Mummy from Hammer Studios with Christopher Lee in one of his early roles. It's not particularly scary, but had good atmosphere and performances. This is for horror or classic film fans!
April 29, 2014
From Hammer, after the success of The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) and Dracula (1958), Hammer turned to another of Universal's horror staples to make into a film, and they decided to do The Mummy. With Hammer Veterans Terence Fisher directing and Jimmy Sangster writing, and although the Hammer version borrows from a few of Universal's Mummy horrors, it makes for entertaining viewing, and it is effective. In 1895, archaeologists John Banning (Peter Cushing), his father Stephen (Felix Aylmer) and his uncle Joseph Whemple (Raymond Huntley) are searching for the tomb of Princess Ananka in Egypt. They manage to enter the tomb, even though local man Mehemet Bey (George Pastell) warns them not to go in. Stephen reads from a scroll he finds in the tomb, and is left in a state of catatonia. 3 years later, back in England, Stephen snaps out of his catatonia, to tell John that when he read the scroll, he brought back to life the Mummy of High Priest Kharis (Christopher Lee), who is looking for him, and plans to avenge those who desecrated the tomb. It's the usual Hammer fare, but it's worth watching, and it's beautifully filmed, and even though it's a little tamer than Frankenstein or Dracula, it has it's moments, and Lee relishes the part of the Mummy brilliantly, bringing to life another famous movie monster in his own inimitable style. Hammer were on a roll here and unstoppable.
½ March 12, 2014
(50%)
It's an improved effort over Universal's 1932 version, but it's still not one of Fisher's best. The script is stronger, and the movie is more fun to watch, although the pacing is uneven as it never really feels like it's getting anywhere near to its conclusion. Overall one of the better mummy films that comes recommended more to fans of Hammer than for everyone.
½ January 20, 2014
The third and weakest of the three original horror reboots done by Hammer in the late fifties, THE MUMMY lacks the literary class of THE CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN and the thick mood of HORROR OF DRACULA, not to mention the acting caliber of both (though it has a very similar cast). Peter Cushing plays John Banning, and his character is limited both literally (by a bum leg) and figuratively; the part just doesn't have anything for Cushing, an actor of tremendous ability, to take a hold of. The same can be said for Christopher Lee, whose acting chops are kept under wraps (I know, I know, I'll stop) the entire movie. Even the sets seem tame in comparison to Dr. Frankenstein's cold mansion and the gothic backdrops in Dracula's story. Little is made of the potential of Egypt's exotic history, save for an overlong flashback sequence in which Lee performs funeral rituals as Cushing narrates like a school teacher. Luckily, the movie is redeemed somewhat by its effects, which are superb. The costume and makeup done on The Mummy itself are terrifyingly grungy, and very effective. And when that monster gets going in the third act, the story gains some traction and has a few moments of icy terror. Having already built themselves a progressive legacy by this point, Hammer had a lot to prove with this film and didn't exactly come through, but as the second part of a Saturday night Hammer double bill the film works just fine.
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