My Man Godfrey Reviews

  • Apr 16, 2019

    A cute, funny romp through days gone by. William Powell is a dream and Carol Lombard is hysterical. If you like old movies, don't miss this one.

    A cute, funny romp through days gone by. William Powell is a dream and Carol Lombard is hysterical. If you like old movies, don't miss this one.

  • Jan 20, 2019

    William Powell and Carole Lombard really played off each other well. Lighthearted yet extremely entertaining.

    William Powell and Carole Lombard really played off each other well. Lighthearted yet extremely entertaining.

  • Jan 10, 2019

    A wonderful comedy that pokes fun at an elite class that seldom makes it under the microscope from a middle or lower class point of view. Also a great film for a history class regarding society, self-reliance, and the Great Depression.

    A wonderful comedy that pokes fun at an elite class that seldom makes it under the microscope from a middle or lower class point of view. Also a great film for a history class regarding society, self-reliance, and the Great Depression.

  • Jan 04, 2019

    This, usually referred to as a screwball comedy, is just that. owell is his usual sarcastic self as the new butler in a very odd family. The two daughters fight over Powell whilst Mischa Aur, as the society wife's protà (C)gà (C) is absolutely brilliant in what was apparently his first comedic role. His gorilla impression is hilarious. Although the laughs aren't maintained throughout, all in all its easy to see why this received so many Academy Award nominations.

    This, usually referred to as a screwball comedy, is just that. owell is his usual sarcastic self as the new butler in a very odd family. The two daughters fight over Powell whilst Mischa Aur, as the society wife's protà (C)gà (C) is absolutely brilliant in what was apparently his first comedic role. His gorilla impression is hilarious. Although the laughs aren't maintained throughout, all in all its easy to see why this received so many Academy Award nominations.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Oct 21, 2018

    A delightful comedy with lovable stars and some nice social messages as well. You don't get much better than William Powell for a leading man in the 1930's, and he's as charming as always as a hobo who is hired as a butler by a rich family. Carole Lombard is one of the two daughters, and because she's so ditzy and disconnected from the real world, you'd think her character would be one you'd hate; however, she's so lovable in her hopelessly romantic outlook, and how silly she gets when she falls in love with Godfrey, that you can't help but smile when she's on the screen. She's just wonderful in her overly dramatic moments, trying comically to assume a sorrowful pose, seduce Godfrey with her gaze, and make grand, sweeping gestures. In one scene, as she expresses her torment theatrically, her sister (Gail Patrick) quips, "Oh, I remember that pose so well. I learned it in Dramatics School. It's Number 8 isn't it?" I love the little ways both stars use their bodies in this film, for example, when Powell struts across the room whistling a tune after he's had a few drinks on his day off, and when Lombard's head bobs around like a rag doll's when he picks her up over his shoulder and takes her up the stairs. The script is peppered with clever dialogue, rapid jokes, and lines that engage us, such as Lombard saying "You have a wonderful sense of humor. I wish I had a sense of humor, but I can never think of the right thing to say until everybody's gone home." While the film has a lot of zaniness, it also delivers messages that were pitch perfect for the Great Depression, and which we could use a dose of today. When we first meet the sisters, they're on a scavenger hunt for a 'forgotten man', who they must bring back to a lavish party, completely oblivious to his situation, and treating him as an object. The film keeps up its satire of the wealthy, showing them as vapid and spoiled, but at the same time, it shows us that everyone - rich or poor - sometimes needs a helping hand in life. The film is really about understanding others, even when someone seems pretty far removed from our own situation. About the poor, Godfrey says "The only difference between a derelict and a man is a job." To Gail Patrick's character, who's been an adversary the whole movie, he says "You taught me the fallacy of false pride. You taught me humility," before encouraging her to use her "high spirits in a more constructive way." He's got civility, empathy, and class, and it's a lovely counterpart to Lombard's lovable melodrama.

    A delightful comedy with lovable stars and some nice social messages as well. You don't get much better than William Powell for a leading man in the 1930's, and he's as charming as always as a hobo who is hired as a butler by a rich family. Carole Lombard is one of the two daughters, and because she's so ditzy and disconnected from the real world, you'd think her character would be one you'd hate; however, she's so lovable in her hopelessly romantic outlook, and how silly she gets when she falls in love with Godfrey, that you can't help but smile when she's on the screen. She's just wonderful in her overly dramatic moments, trying comically to assume a sorrowful pose, seduce Godfrey with her gaze, and make grand, sweeping gestures. In one scene, as she expresses her torment theatrically, her sister (Gail Patrick) quips, "Oh, I remember that pose so well. I learned it in Dramatics School. It's Number 8 isn't it?" I love the little ways both stars use their bodies in this film, for example, when Powell struts across the room whistling a tune after he's had a few drinks on his day off, and when Lombard's head bobs around like a rag doll's when he picks her up over his shoulder and takes her up the stairs. The script is peppered with clever dialogue, rapid jokes, and lines that engage us, such as Lombard saying "You have a wonderful sense of humor. I wish I had a sense of humor, but I can never think of the right thing to say until everybody's gone home." While the film has a lot of zaniness, it also delivers messages that were pitch perfect for the Great Depression, and which we could use a dose of today. When we first meet the sisters, they're on a scavenger hunt for a 'forgotten man', who they must bring back to a lavish party, completely oblivious to his situation, and treating him as an object. The film keeps up its satire of the wealthy, showing them as vapid and spoiled, but at the same time, it shows us that everyone - rich or poor - sometimes needs a helping hand in life. The film is really about understanding others, even when someone seems pretty far removed from our own situation. About the poor, Godfrey says "The only difference between a derelict and a man is a job." To Gail Patrick's character, who's been an adversary the whole movie, he says "You taught me the fallacy of false pride. You taught me humility," before encouraging her to use her "high spirits in a more constructive way." He's got civility, empathy, and class, and it's a lovely counterpart to Lombard's lovable melodrama.

  • Oct 07, 2018

    Classic. Enough said.

    Classic. Enough said.

  • Oct 16, 2017

    Wonderful. Irene glitters and shines warmly, and Godfrey is so gallant and honest. But the words! And the acting! This film felt so modern!

    Wonderful. Irene glitters and shines warmly, and Godfrey is so gallant and honest. But the words! And the acting! This film felt so modern!

  • Sep 21, 2017

    A wealth of humor, character, social commentary-if only movies that cost 10x as much had half the depth on display here.

    A wealth of humor, character, social commentary-if only movies that cost 10x as much had half the depth on display here.

  • May 15, 2017

    My Man Godfrey is the perfect marriage of screwball comedy and probing social commentary. Arguably (and in my opinion) the best screwball comedy of all time! Ditzy, golden-hearted heiress Irene(Lombard) chances upon Godfrey(Powell) as she and a group of society friends embark on a unique scavenger hunt across New York to find the most priceless treasure: "a forgotten man." The first person to return with "a forgotten man" receives the sincerest accolades of New York's upper echelon. Unbeknownst to Irene who adopts Godfrey as her pet project ( a protégé in training), Godfrey is not a pauper but an irascible prince of a guy who is disenchanted with the snobbish attitudes of the upper crust. Rounding out the rag-tag band of uproarious characters is Irene's equally ditzy mother (Burke), long-suffering father (Pallette), and spoiled sister (Patrick). Irene's mother has her own protégé, a talentless windbag who mooches off the family. Set in the midst of The Great Depression, this film brilliantly highlights the plight of those in despair, and turns the subject on it's ear by satirizing elitist society and its vain, self-absorbed pageantry. Eventually, after her million-and-one broken engagements and unable to attain Godfrey's attentions, Irene storms off to Europe. Meanwhile, Godfrey is setting in motion a plan for his redemption as a humanitarian. What ensues is glorious hilarity. In the end, Irene saddles her man and Godfrey tames his "little Irene" ,or does he? A film that far outshines many of its predecessors and many of its progeny. Films including The Awful Truth, Sullivan's Travels, and Meet John Doe who tried to claim credit for the Depression-era screwball genre or allusion to the "forgotten men" really channeled this amazing gem directed by Gregory La Cava. The others pale in comparison: it is indeed the best of the genre and the top comedy of all time! In addition, this 20th Century Screen Legends release features the best print of any currently available including Criterion. It also has a marvelously wonderful colorized version that is pristine and clear, which may attract younger audiences attention more raptly. This is definitely the definitive version of this timeless masterpiece!

    My Man Godfrey is the perfect marriage of screwball comedy and probing social commentary. Arguably (and in my opinion) the best screwball comedy of all time! Ditzy, golden-hearted heiress Irene(Lombard) chances upon Godfrey(Powell) as she and a group of society friends embark on a unique scavenger hunt across New York to find the most priceless treasure: "a forgotten man." The first person to return with "a forgotten man" receives the sincerest accolades of New York's upper echelon. Unbeknownst to Irene who adopts Godfrey as her pet project ( a protégé in training), Godfrey is not a pauper but an irascible prince of a guy who is disenchanted with the snobbish attitudes of the upper crust. Rounding out the rag-tag band of uproarious characters is Irene's equally ditzy mother (Burke), long-suffering father (Pallette), and spoiled sister (Patrick). Irene's mother has her own protégé, a talentless windbag who mooches off the family. Set in the midst of The Great Depression, this film brilliantly highlights the plight of those in despair, and turns the subject on it's ear by satirizing elitist society and its vain, self-absorbed pageantry. Eventually, after her million-and-one broken engagements and unable to attain Godfrey's attentions, Irene storms off to Europe. Meanwhile, Godfrey is setting in motion a plan for his redemption as a humanitarian. What ensues is glorious hilarity. In the end, Irene saddles her man and Godfrey tames his "little Irene" ,or does he? A film that far outshines many of its predecessors and many of its progeny. Films including The Awful Truth, Sullivan's Travels, and Meet John Doe who tried to claim credit for the Depression-era screwball genre or allusion to the "forgotten men" really channeled this amazing gem directed by Gregory La Cava. The others pale in comparison: it is indeed the best of the genre and the top comedy of all time! In addition, this 20th Century Screen Legends release features the best print of any currently available including Criterion. It also has a marvelously wonderful colorized version that is pristine and clear, which may attract younger audiences attention more raptly. This is definitely the definitive version of this timeless masterpiece!

  • Apr 25, 2017

    Screwball comedy at its finest! A must see for lovers of classic rom com.

    Screwball comedy at its finest! A must see for lovers of classic rom com.