Touch of Evil Reviews

  • Feb 12, 2019

    Flawless. Thrilling, entertaining, technically awesome... Orson welles is great, portraying a character that surely is one of the greatest in movie history. This is a great movie everybody.

    Flawless. Thrilling, entertaining, technically awesome... Orson welles is great, portraying a character that surely is one of the greatest in movie history. This is a great movie everybody.

  • Feb 01, 2019

    Orson Welles' strangely relevant noir thriller. Touch of Evil (1958) is about a shockingly close to a modern noir story as you can get. It speaks on the United States and Mexico border, police corruption, racism, and justice. What is left of the law is up to you in the end, but Touch of Evil dedicates itself into portraying a distinctly honest depiction of police officers doing their work, whether planting evidence, siding with the white man, or wire tapping. Touch of Evil demonstrates every police activity you can think of and more. Orson Welles' direction is immaculate, gathering every interesting angle and perspective to enhance his noir aesthetic. The gritty and sweaty look of everything grounds Touch of Evil in a gross realism that can be uncomfortable. Sometimes we need to see the problem as it is before we can deal with it. Touch of Evil is just that as Welles openly critiques the police force for their racist malpractice of all manner. His own performance is a damning portrayal as Orson Welles plays the reformed alcoholic American police chief Hank Qunlan. His corruption, deceptive tactics, and outrageous hatred are shocking as much as I was shocked to see how massive Welles became later in his career. He is far removed from his younger handsome days and commanding voice. His stature is beastly and his voice now terrifying. But Welles acts as well and convincingly as his youth. He plays the unfair policeman with a keen sense of direction. It's a sad role as it feels like it could have come out yesterday and still be relevant. Charlton Heston is surprisingly great as the Mexican policeman Mike Vargas. Heston gives a genuinely empathetic role as Vargas, who must overcome the racist American police department as well as the Mexican organized crime family. Heston is believable as a man that just wants to find the truth and arrive at justice. He is the stalwart example of decency and justice in Touch of Evil. I really enjoyed seeing Janet Leigh as Vargas' wife Susan. She's completely realistically scared and upset as she is victimized by Quinlan's schemes. You feel particularly bad for Susan because of Leigh's great acting. She comes across as sincere even in the awkward and frightening moments in Touch of Evil. I thought it was quite neat of Orson Welles to have cast the almighty Marlene Dietrich in a tender supporting role. She casts a mystique and charm as a Mexican fortune teller. You feel her femme fatale and noir tone with every breath and look Dietrich gives. She is gorgeous even as a brunette, but her true talent was her hazy alluring vibe and dreamy persona that she exudes as an actress. Even Zsa Zsa Gabor makes a quick cameo as a strip club dancer and witness that Orson Welles interrogates for a brief encounter. I recall Joseph Cotten playing a sleazy and director policeman in two short scenes. In all, Touch of Evil is a brilliant noir that is worth watching.

    Orson Welles' strangely relevant noir thriller. Touch of Evil (1958) is about a shockingly close to a modern noir story as you can get. It speaks on the United States and Mexico border, police corruption, racism, and justice. What is left of the law is up to you in the end, but Touch of Evil dedicates itself into portraying a distinctly honest depiction of police officers doing their work, whether planting evidence, siding with the white man, or wire tapping. Touch of Evil demonstrates every police activity you can think of and more. Orson Welles' direction is immaculate, gathering every interesting angle and perspective to enhance his noir aesthetic. The gritty and sweaty look of everything grounds Touch of Evil in a gross realism that can be uncomfortable. Sometimes we need to see the problem as it is before we can deal with it. Touch of Evil is just that as Welles openly critiques the police force for their racist malpractice of all manner. His own performance is a damning portrayal as Orson Welles plays the reformed alcoholic American police chief Hank Qunlan. His corruption, deceptive tactics, and outrageous hatred are shocking as much as I was shocked to see how massive Welles became later in his career. He is far removed from his younger handsome days and commanding voice. His stature is beastly and his voice now terrifying. But Welles acts as well and convincingly as his youth. He plays the unfair policeman with a keen sense of direction. It's a sad role as it feels like it could have come out yesterday and still be relevant. Charlton Heston is surprisingly great as the Mexican policeman Mike Vargas. Heston gives a genuinely empathetic role as Vargas, who must overcome the racist American police department as well as the Mexican organized crime family. Heston is believable as a man that just wants to find the truth and arrive at justice. He is the stalwart example of decency and justice in Touch of Evil. I really enjoyed seeing Janet Leigh as Vargas' wife Susan. She's completely realistically scared and upset as she is victimized by Quinlan's schemes. You feel particularly bad for Susan because of Leigh's great acting. She comes across as sincere even in the awkward and frightening moments in Touch of Evil. I thought it was quite neat of Orson Welles to have cast the almighty Marlene Dietrich in a tender supporting role. She casts a mystique and charm as a Mexican fortune teller. You feel her femme fatale and noir tone with every breath and look Dietrich gives. She is gorgeous even as a brunette, but her true talent was her hazy alluring vibe and dreamy persona that she exudes as an actress. Even Zsa Zsa Gabor makes a quick cameo as a strip club dancer and witness that Orson Welles interrogates for a brief encounter. I recall Joseph Cotten playing a sleazy and director policeman in two short scenes. In all, Touch of Evil is a brilliant noir that is worth watching.

  • Jan 30, 2019

    1.30.19 NF w/Sh & J

    1.30.19 NF w/Sh & J

  • Nov 29, 2018

    i thought this was pretty good movie

    i thought this was pretty good movie

  • Avatar
    Alec B Super Reviewer
    Oct 14, 2018

    I love how weird this movie is. Yes it's suspenseful, yes the direction is superb, but it is the deliberately muddled plot and oddball characters make the proceedings so memorable.

    I love how weird this movie is. Yes it's suspenseful, yes the direction is superb, but it is the deliberately muddled plot and oddball characters make the proceedings so memorable.

  • Sep 07, 2018

    If you get the '90s re-cut, this is one of the greatest films ever made. It's sad that no one will ever see the real cut Welles intended. It has one of the best endings on film and leaves the audience contemplating issues of morality without giving us too many answers.

    If you get the '90s re-cut, this is one of the greatest films ever made. It's sad that no one will ever see the real cut Welles intended. It has one of the best endings on film and leaves the audience contemplating issues of morality without giving us too many answers.

  • Sep 06, 2018

    Puntaje Original: 7.0 Una obra digna de admiración, thriller memorable.

    Puntaje Original: 7.0 Una obra digna de admiración, thriller memorable.

  • Jun 13, 2018

    Butchered by studio chiefs and restored in 1998 as outlined in his 58-page letter to head of production, Orson Welles' crime noir about the corruption of morality and power of a sheriff in pursuing his American judicial chauvinism is atmospherically haunting with its shadow-laden cinematography and low-angle shots.

    Butchered by studio chiefs and restored in 1998 as outlined in his 58-page letter to head of production, Orson Welles' crime noir about the corruption of morality and power of a sheriff in pursuing his American judicial chauvinism is atmospherically haunting with its shadow-laden cinematography and low-angle shots.

  • Apr 13, 2018

    Orson Eelles is superb, every second, and the black and white is masterfully deployed. Many memorable scenes, from start to fisnish. Even miscasting Heston as a a gallant Mexican (emphasis on gallant) and Janet Leigh's iirritating lack of cleverness to spoil thus superb film

    Orson Eelles is superb, every second, and the black and white is masterfully deployed. Many memorable scenes, from start to fisnish. Even miscasting Heston as a a gallant Mexican (emphasis on gallant) and Janet Leigh's iirritating lack of cleverness to spoil thus superb film

  • Mar 23, 2018

    This film remains shocking due to the actions Hank Quinlan takes once his crimes begin to catch up to him. He first attempts to drink his troubles away, but after more info about him comes out, he starts taking drastic measures to cover up his tracks, measures which secure his status as one of cinema's great villains. Along with several brilliant sequences and a great cast, this film will linger with you long after watching it.

    This film remains shocking due to the actions Hank Quinlan takes once his crimes begin to catch up to him. He first attempts to drink his troubles away, but after more info about him comes out, he starts taking drastic measures to cover up his tracks, measures which secure his status as one of cinema's great villains. Along with several brilliant sequences and a great cast, this film will linger with you long after watching it.