The Wrong Man Reviews

  • 9h ago

    Fonda carries this slow boiling nightmare of the innocent man who finds himself without an alibi and all of the evidence piling up against him. This film wasn't exciting or emotionally stirring but the pacing was solid, capturing and creating the tension, fear, and confusion one would expect anyone to feel in this situation. I was left a little disappointed with the lackluster ending before realizing this was one of the rare occurrences where Hitchcock based his film on a true story, which he alluded to in his silhouette's on screen introduction to open this movie. Hitchcock also does not have his usual cameo in this film, evidence again of how he was taking a different approach and tone in the retelling of a true story. 6.5*

    Fonda carries this slow boiling nightmare of the innocent man who finds himself without an alibi and all of the evidence piling up against him. This film wasn't exciting or emotionally stirring but the pacing was solid, capturing and creating the tension, fear, and confusion one would expect anyone to feel in this situation. I was left a little disappointed with the lackluster ending before realizing this was one of the rare occurrences where Hitchcock based his film on a true story, which he alluded to in his silhouette's on screen introduction to open this movie. Hitchcock also does not have his usual cameo in this film, evidence again of how he was taking a different approach and tone in the retelling of a true story. 6.5*

  • Jun 21, 2020

    This movie was a letdown, especially for Alfred Hitchcock. It had an intriguing premise, but nothing noteworthy or surprising happened in the movie. It was just a conventional story with great acting by Henry Fonda.

    This movie was a letdown, especially for Alfred Hitchcock. It had an intriguing premise, but nothing noteworthy or surprising happened in the movie. It was just a conventional story with great acting by Henry Fonda.

  • Jun 05, 2020

    Hitchcock sets a simple story, by that I mean it's one story as opposed to several characters with separate stories. There is a minimalist feel to it. The atmosphere is hermetic and authentic. Henry Fonda stars in the film and of course he's a highly regarded actor but in this film his deadpan expressions and his monotone voice and monotone feelings are close to irritating. Hitchcock never worked with Fonda again. Hitchcock chose to make all of the side characters bland, it seems like it was done on purpose to make Fonda's Manny Balestrero stand out. Hitchcock excels at minimal dialogue and he shows his mastery of moving the story and expressing feelings with cinematography.

    Hitchcock sets a simple story, by that I mean it's one story as opposed to several characters with separate stories. There is a minimalist feel to it. The atmosphere is hermetic and authentic. Henry Fonda stars in the film and of course he's a highly regarded actor but in this film his deadpan expressions and his monotone voice and monotone feelings are close to irritating. Hitchcock never worked with Fonda again. Hitchcock chose to make all of the side characters bland, it seems like it was done on purpose to make Fonda's Manny Balestrero stand out. Hitchcock excels at minimal dialogue and he shows his mastery of moving the story and expressing feelings with cinematography.

  • May 14, 2020

    One of the best and most underrated noir of the 50's. Both male and female leads give their best performances on film, in my opinion. Vera Miles particularly disturbing. Definitely one of Hitchcock's darkest ones

    One of the best and most underrated noir of the 50's. Both male and female leads give their best performances on film, in my opinion. Vera Miles particularly disturbing. Definitely one of Hitchcock's darkest ones

  • Apr 11, 2020

    Boring. Can't recommend it.

    Boring. Can't recommend it.

  • Jan 16, 2020

    Shocking and infuriating story better told by Hitchcock before. Alfred Hitchcock's courtroom drama The Wrong Man (1956) is only an average movie among Hitchcock's immense filmography. The idea of the mistaken identity case is better handled by Hitchcock himself just 3 years prior to The Wrong Man in his brilliant film I Confess. Hitchcock directs with the occasional cool visual of a distressed character in a close-up, but many of his wide and medium shots are so bland in The Wrong Man. I Confess had more style and heart. Here, Hitchcock is trying to present this shocking true story realistically, but the virtues of an actual account are not interesting by themselves. There are even some seriously poor choices like the revolving camera shot trying to show Fonda's mind spinning in circles once he's in prison, but it looks so dated. Bernard Herrmann's score is exciting and beautiful at times, but Hitchcock barely uses. Most of The Wrong Man is cascaded in ultra serious silence to try and make the narrative more mature. I think this was a waste of lovely compositions from Herrmann. The Wrong Man should have utilized a genius composer like Bernard Herrmann much more frequently to keep audiences engaged. The Wrong Man is only 105 minutes, but it feels much longer due to the lack of music and momentum from the lethargic editing from George Tomasini's infrequent cuts. He lingers far too long on many insignificant shots. Robert Burks' cinematography starts out interesting and loses interest as dull flat shots of room and people feel thoughtless compared to his previous work on the far superior I Confess. Henry Fonda is an iconic actor for good reason. He is superb at finding the heart and empathy for a character in 12 Angry Men or creating depravity with his villain in Once Upon a Time in the West. However, Fonda is oddly wooden in The Wrong Man, which is strange as it's such an emotional role. He chooses shocked and subdued instead of indignant, outraged, or frightened. The result being an uninteresting performance in an average Hitchcock movie. Vera Miles gives the best performance as Fonda's distraught wife. Her slow fall into insanity and misery is fascinating and very realistic. She plays it so well with subtle nuance and plenty of care. It's her dead eyes that are so startling in The Wrong Man which is shocking because she's so alive in the beginning. I just wish Hitchcock had used Vera Miles more for The Wrong Man as she's barely in any of the movie! Anthony Quayle is really good as Fonda's righteous lawyer, but he gets lost in a sea of forgettable supporting characters. I could not tell you the name of any other character or actor in the movie. The Wrong Man's success depends upon Fonda and Miles' acting and that's about it. In all, Hitchcock did this same style of story better before within I Confess. Watch that instead.

    Shocking and infuriating story better told by Hitchcock before. Alfred Hitchcock's courtroom drama The Wrong Man (1956) is only an average movie among Hitchcock's immense filmography. The idea of the mistaken identity case is better handled by Hitchcock himself just 3 years prior to The Wrong Man in his brilliant film I Confess. Hitchcock directs with the occasional cool visual of a distressed character in a close-up, but many of his wide and medium shots are so bland in The Wrong Man. I Confess had more style and heart. Here, Hitchcock is trying to present this shocking true story realistically, but the virtues of an actual account are not interesting by themselves. There are even some seriously poor choices like the revolving camera shot trying to show Fonda's mind spinning in circles once he's in prison, but it looks so dated. Bernard Herrmann's score is exciting and beautiful at times, but Hitchcock barely uses. Most of The Wrong Man is cascaded in ultra serious silence to try and make the narrative more mature. I think this was a waste of lovely compositions from Herrmann. The Wrong Man should have utilized a genius composer like Bernard Herrmann much more frequently to keep audiences engaged. The Wrong Man is only 105 minutes, but it feels much longer due to the lack of music and momentum from the lethargic editing from George Tomasini's infrequent cuts. He lingers far too long on many insignificant shots. Robert Burks' cinematography starts out interesting and loses interest as dull flat shots of room and people feel thoughtless compared to his previous work on the far superior I Confess. Henry Fonda is an iconic actor for good reason. He is superb at finding the heart and empathy for a character in 12 Angry Men or creating depravity with his villain in Once Upon a Time in the West. However, Fonda is oddly wooden in The Wrong Man, which is strange as it's such an emotional role. He chooses shocked and subdued instead of indignant, outraged, or frightened. The result being an uninteresting performance in an average Hitchcock movie. Vera Miles gives the best performance as Fonda's distraught wife. Her slow fall into insanity and misery is fascinating and very realistic. She plays it so well with subtle nuance and plenty of care. It's her dead eyes that are so startling in The Wrong Man which is shocking because she's so alive in the beginning. I just wish Hitchcock had used Vera Miles more for The Wrong Man as she's barely in any of the movie! Anthony Quayle is really good as Fonda's righteous lawyer, but he gets lost in a sea of forgettable supporting characters. I could not tell you the name of any other character or actor in the movie. The Wrong Man's success depends upon Fonda and Miles' acting and that's about it. In all, Hitchcock did this same style of story better before within I Confess. Watch that instead.

  • Aug 06, 2019

    Scary Look at How Police Framed People, Particularly minorities in the 1950s Modern police techniques were already known to police departments by this time. You should not question witnesses in the way seen here, and to rely on testimony from people with other substantiation was frowned upon. Here we have the police breaking their own rules, a common occurrence, to convict a Hispanic man and cause havoc throughout his extended family. The police do everything wrong, in terms of justice and the law, but they can get away with it. Watching their schemes to wrongfully convict Fonda turns your stomach, but this kind of police action did occur and is still occurring. The sheriff of my county routinely arrested American citizens of Mexican descent and wrongfully accused them of any and every crime he could imagine. They only got him for racial profiling, although several deaths lay in his wake. Injustice is very hard to watch, but it IS reality, and we must remain vigilant so that it becomes a thing of the past.

    Scary Look at How Police Framed People, Particularly minorities in the 1950s Modern police techniques were already known to police departments by this time. You should not question witnesses in the way seen here, and to rely on testimony from people with other substantiation was frowned upon. Here we have the police breaking their own rules, a common occurrence, to convict a Hispanic man and cause havoc throughout his extended family. The police do everything wrong, in terms of justice and the law, but they can get away with it. Watching their schemes to wrongfully convict Fonda turns your stomach, but this kind of police action did occur and is still occurring. The sheriff of my county routinely arrested American citizens of Mexican descent and wrongfully accused them of any and every crime he could imagine. They only got him for racial profiling, although several deaths lay in his wake. Injustice is very hard to watch, but it IS reality, and we must remain vigilant so that it becomes a thing of the past.

  • Jul 23, 2019

    Gripping and tragic. since Fate strikes down the strong man, everyone weep with me.

    Gripping and tragic. since Fate strikes down the strong man, everyone weep with me.

  • May 07, 2019

    The best thrilling movie ever made!

    The best thrilling movie ever made!

  • Jan 27, 2019

    Fan of Hitchcock and a fan of Fonda, but for me, this might be the most overrated film in Hitchcock's oeuvre. I felt no investment in any of the characters, including Fonda's, who spent the entirety of the film with a look of incredulity on his face and no believable character arc. Cinematography was substandard for a Hitchcock film of this era. Pacing was dreadful. Perhaps worst of all, it strains the limits of willing suspension of disbelief despite being based on a 'true' story.

    Fan of Hitchcock and a fan of Fonda, but for me, this might be the most overrated film in Hitchcock's oeuvre. I felt no investment in any of the characters, including Fonda's, who spent the entirety of the film with a look of incredulity on his face and no believable character arc. Cinematography was substandard for a Hitchcock film of this era. Pacing was dreadful. Perhaps worst of all, it strains the limits of willing suspension of disbelief despite being based on a 'true' story.