The Jungle Book Reviews

  • Apr 23, 2019

    The Jungle Book is a movie that has a plot that is worth exploring, and I can see why it has been made into films so many times throughout the years. This particular interpretation is focused on having a fun time with little Mowgli and his jungle friends. I don’t know if they create a strong case for the imminent danger that forced Mowgli to return to the man-village, particularly because the main antagonist isn’t introduced until the last 10 minutes. However, you do get the idea that he doesn’t fit in all that well, and could be prey to some of the less scrupulous animals in the jungle. There are a few very memorable songs in The Jungle Book, and they get stuck in my head any time I think about them. It’s not as overflowing with musical masterpieces as some other Disney films, but it has enough to keep you tapping your toes in some of the better scenes. The thing that I think this version of The Jungle Book struggles with is filling the time. The movie is only 78 minutes long, and yet it still feels padded for length. Mowgli’s adventures through the jungle are episodic, almost like they took a chapter book and segmented the film out into the exact same chapters. The sad reality is there are a number of these chapters that don’t feel essential to the story arc. Some even seem repetitive, which is crazy considering the small amount of time they needed to fill. More development of the characters, or emphasis on why Mowgli needed to go and why he was reluctant to go would have been great. I like the story, and I was surprised returning to The Jungle Book this time that I found it overall enjoyable, because this was never one of my favorites from Disney. However, I do think they could have done a little more with the story to make it work better as a film.

    The Jungle Book is a movie that has a plot that is worth exploring, and I can see why it has been made into films so many times throughout the years. This particular interpretation is focused on having a fun time with little Mowgli and his jungle friends. I don’t know if they create a strong case for the imminent danger that forced Mowgli to return to the man-village, particularly because the main antagonist isn’t introduced until the last 10 minutes. However, you do get the idea that he doesn’t fit in all that well, and could be prey to some of the less scrupulous animals in the jungle. There are a few very memorable songs in The Jungle Book, and they get stuck in my head any time I think about them. It’s not as overflowing with musical masterpieces as some other Disney films, but it has enough to keep you tapping your toes in some of the better scenes. The thing that I think this version of The Jungle Book struggles with is filling the time. The movie is only 78 minutes long, and yet it still feels padded for length. Mowgli’s adventures through the jungle are episodic, almost like they took a chapter book and segmented the film out into the exact same chapters. The sad reality is there are a number of these chapters that don’t feel essential to the story arc. Some even seem repetitive, which is crazy considering the small amount of time they needed to fill. More development of the characters, or emphasis on why Mowgli needed to go and why he was reluctant to go would have been great. I like the story, and I was surprised returning to The Jungle Book this time that I found it overall enjoyable, because this was never one of my favorites from Disney. However, I do think they could have done a little more with the story to make it work better as a film.

  • Mar 27, 2019

    One of Disney's more decent turn outs, with one or two catchy songs, memorable villains, and just enough charm. 3.5/5 - Good

    One of Disney's more decent turn outs, with one or two catchy songs, memorable villains, and just enough charm. 3.5/5 - Good

  • Mar 17, 2019

    The most political movie of Disney and probably one of the best animation picutres of all time, Mowgli is a kind of movie that deserves your attention, more then once. I MUST talk about this film and how political is (the most in Disney) it and how is probably one of the best animation pictures ever done. This interpretation is from my one. First of all, all the animals (included the girl, after all human beings are animals) are politic-economics systems. Starting by the Wolfs. They're the Democracy, they VOTE AND DECIDE that Mowgli NEEDS to be banished from the Wolf Pack for the safety of their own. Then it comes Bagheera, i'll talk about him after. Then it comes the Snake Kaa. It represents the Fascism. It hypnotizes, seduces, lies and when you see, it strangles you. Fun fact: The snake always represent the Fascism in anti-fascism propaganda. Then it comes the Elephants. They're Military, in matter of fact, they're the totalitarian system. They have patent. They're strong, heavy, gross, hard-beings, inflexible, abrupt. Real war machines (history proves that). Then it comes Balu. He's the Bear, and essentially the Communism, but no the Communism describes by Marx and Morus; he's the Soviet Communism (The Bear was a strong symbol in the USSR). His song theme makes it clear as water: "The simple bare necessities Forget about your worries and your strife [...] Old Mother Nature's recipes That brings the bare necessities of life" Then it comes the apes, and they have a king, sitting on a throne and want more firepower (fire). King Louie represents the Monarchy. There's a scene with him and Balu and he's tricked by Balu, just like the russian Monarchy get screwed when it comes the Bolsheviks Revolution. Later appears what everyone was having fear. The Tiger Shere Khan. He is the Nazism and it gets pretty clear because there's a dialog with Bagheera and Colonel Hathi. Bagheera warns Colonel about Shere Khan (German Nazi) and Colonel answer: "Nonsense! Shere Khan is miles of distance from here". Fun fact: There's a war tank german from WWII and it calls German WW2 TIGER or Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger At last, it comes the vultures that are waiting Mowgli to die to eat him and are always asking "What we are gonna do?" (just like shareholders). Besides, their faces are based on the Beatles (for real); They're the Capitalism, specifically USA/England . Other fact that proves my point is that they keep singing, cheering Mowgli that is really sad and he forget about his problems (Bread and circuses). ONLY WHEN THE VULTURES ARE IN THE SCREEN AND ONLY IN THAT MOMENT, SHERE KHAN APPEARS, MEANING ONLY WHEN IT HAVES THE CAPITALISM, THE NAZISM CAN RISE. And it gets REALLY clear when Shere Khan arrives and the vultures (which are stacked one over the other), when the Tiger comes, THEY FALL! Shere Khan tries to attack the boy. In that momment, arrives Balu and fight against Shere Khan (USSR vs. Nazis). Later, the vultures help and at last, in this alliance, Shere Khan is defeated. In the end, Mowgli observes a girl, singing and he's seduced by her and he's taken to her presence. Basically she's a new system that will be bring to women. And it's reinforced by the fact that SHE'S THE ONLY FEMALE CHARACTER IN THE ENTIRE MOVIE. At Last, Bagheera is the Anarchism. He doesn't connect with no other animal, he's giving a shit to the Elephants and even he doesn't like Balu and get pissed by the fact that Balu "is a tramp", he respect him and in the end, they come out hugging each other, singing "Bear Necessities". About the scene of the girl and Mowgli, there's more things about it, more dialogues that makes it clear that she's the new system and it's the better for him, but Balu says that wanted to keep the boy with him. Mowgli by his own represents the Humanity that is always searching for a new system and that's the reason that he doesn't have none personality and when he gets related with any aninal, he gets the animal personality (except Shere Khan, because Disney didn't screw it up in this time, FORTUNALLY).

    The most political movie of Disney and probably one of the best animation picutres of all time, Mowgli is a kind of movie that deserves your attention, more then once. I MUST talk about this film and how political is (the most in Disney) it and how is probably one of the best animation pictures ever done. This interpretation is from my one. First of all, all the animals (included the girl, after all human beings are animals) are politic-economics systems. Starting by the Wolfs. They're the Democracy, they VOTE AND DECIDE that Mowgli NEEDS to be banished from the Wolf Pack for the safety of their own. Then it comes Bagheera, i'll talk about him after. Then it comes the Snake Kaa. It represents the Fascism. It hypnotizes, seduces, lies and when you see, it strangles you. Fun fact: The snake always represent the Fascism in anti-fascism propaganda. Then it comes the Elephants. They're Military, in matter of fact, they're the totalitarian system. They have patent. They're strong, heavy, gross, hard-beings, inflexible, abrupt. Real war machines (history proves that). Then it comes Balu. He's the Bear, and essentially the Communism, but no the Communism describes by Marx and Morus; he's the Soviet Communism (The Bear was a strong symbol in the USSR). His song theme makes it clear as water: "The simple bare necessities Forget about your worries and your strife [...] Old Mother Nature's recipes That brings the bare necessities of life" Then it comes the apes, and they have a king, sitting on a throne and want more firepower (fire). King Louie represents the Monarchy. There's a scene with him and Balu and he's tricked by Balu, just like the russian Monarchy get screwed when it comes the Bolsheviks Revolution. Later appears what everyone was having fear. The Tiger Shere Khan. He is the Nazism and it gets pretty clear because there's a dialog with Bagheera and Colonel Hathi. Bagheera warns Colonel about Shere Khan (German Nazi) and Colonel answer: "Nonsense! Shere Khan is miles of distance from here". Fun fact: There's a war tank german from WWII and it calls German WW2 TIGER or Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger At last, it comes the vultures that are waiting Mowgli to die to eat him and are always asking "What we are gonna do?" (just like shareholders). Besides, their faces are based on the Beatles (for real); They're the Capitalism, specifically USA/England . Other fact that proves my point is that they keep singing, cheering Mowgli that is really sad and he forget about his problems (Bread and circuses). ONLY WHEN THE VULTURES ARE IN THE SCREEN AND ONLY IN THAT MOMENT, SHERE KHAN APPEARS, MEANING ONLY WHEN IT HAVES THE CAPITALISM, THE NAZISM CAN RISE. And it gets REALLY clear when Shere Khan arrives and the vultures (which are stacked one over the other), when the Tiger comes, THEY FALL! Shere Khan tries to attack the boy. In that momment, arrives Balu and fight against Shere Khan (USSR vs. Nazis). Later, the vultures help and at last, in this alliance, Shere Khan is defeated. In the end, Mowgli observes a girl, singing and he's seduced by her and he's taken to her presence. Basically she's a new system that will be bring to women. And it's reinforced by the fact that SHE'S THE ONLY FEMALE CHARACTER IN THE ENTIRE MOVIE. At Last, Bagheera is the Anarchism. He doesn't connect with no other animal, he's giving a shit to the Elephants and even he doesn't like Balu and get pissed by the fact that Balu "is a tramp", he respect him and in the end, they come out hugging each other, singing "Bear Necessities". About the scene of the girl and Mowgli, there's more things about it, more dialogues that makes it clear that she's the new system and it's the better for him, but Balu says that wanted to keep the boy with him. Mowgli by his own represents the Humanity that is always searching for a new system and that's the reason that he doesn't have none personality and when he gets related with any aninal, he gets the animal personality (except Shere Khan, because Disney didn't screw it up in this time, FORTUNALLY).

  • Mar 06, 2019

    A Book And A Torch Of Fire. The Jungle Book Disney's favourite kid among all, is not some biased political act, but works hard and succeeds on nothing but merit. This is why after decades, this film has aged well. It welcomes every fear of ours with open arms and chirpy body language that makes this stay equally heartwarming as much as smart it is. In fact, the narration is so lucid that the writers might be making a fool out of us and we wouldn't know the difference. Now this is the sort of writing that we shouldn't mind, if anything we should encourage it. Passing on shoulder to shoulder- literally- our lead character Mowgli, meets plethora of characters. From Bagheera The Panther to a pack of wolves, to Elephants, to Kaa The Snake, to Baloo The Bear, to a troop of monkeys only to visit the ultimate Shere Khan and the most underrated and hilarious Vultures. This back and forth of being taught on, our protagonist seems to be left a bit undercooked in the process. Often gullible and also dogmatic at times, Mowgli, the protagonist that we are told to root for, doesn't have anything to offer as an individual being. In fact, if anyone soars above all these bushy plants, is Baloo's carefree and father-ly attitude gluing this entire cast for a more meaningful reason. Bagheera too comes under the similar shade, but his almost non-flawed theories makes him one dimensional in certain parts of the storytelling. Nevertheless, this culmination of possibly every social satire brings in one delight night out for you to sleep on. The songs are catchy to a point where it is impossible to not hum "The Bear Necessities" for a couple of days. The Jungle Book has the quality to be wild, it may not be foliated to its best, but it certainly isn't discouraged.

    A Book And A Torch Of Fire. The Jungle Book Disney's favourite kid among all, is not some biased political act, but works hard and succeeds on nothing but merit. This is why after decades, this film has aged well. It welcomes every fear of ours with open arms and chirpy body language that makes this stay equally heartwarming as much as smart it is. In fact, the narration is so lucid that the writers might be making a fool out of us and we wouldn't know the difference. Now this is the sort of writing that we shouldn't mind, if anything we should encourage it. Passing on shoulder to shoulder- literally- our lead character Mowgli, meets plethora of characters. From Bagheera The Panther to a pack of wolves, to Elephants, to Kaa The Snake, to Baloo The Bear, to a troop of monkeys only to visit the ultimate Shere Khan and the most underrated and hilarious Vultures. This back and forth of being taught on, our protagonist seems to be left a bit undercooked in the process. Often gullible and also dogmatic at times, Mowgli, the protagonist that we are told to root for, doesn't have anything to offer as an individual being. In fact, if anyone soars above all these bushy plants, is Baloo's carefree and father-ly attitude gluing this entire cast for a more meaningful reason. Bagheera too comes under the similar shade, but his almost non-flawed theories makes him one dimensional in certain parts of the storytelling. Nevertheless, this culmination of possibly every social satire brings in one delight night out for you to sleep on. The songs are catchy to a point where it is impossible to not hum "The Bear Necessities" for a couple of days. The Jungle Book has the quality to be wild, it may not be foliated to its best, but it certainly isn't discouraged.

  • Mar 05, 2019

    Its the First movie ive watched

    Its the First movie ive watched

  • Feb 01, 2019

    The best animated musical movie ever made! With 2 of the best movie songs ever sung: The Bare Necessities and I Wanna Be Like You!

    The best animated musical movie ever made! With 2 of the best movie songs ever sung: The Bare Necessities and I Wanna Be Like You!

  • Jan 28, 2019

    The "old faithful" of Rudyard Kipling's tale. That's all I got to say.

    The "old faithful" of Rudyard Kipling's tale. That's all I got to say.

  • Nov 25, 2018

    Beloved animated Disney feature may have its flaws, but the jolly flow of the story, the lovingly portraited animals and the songs make it extremely enjoyable.

    Beloved animated Disney feature may have its flaws, but the jolly flow of the story, the lovingly portraited animals and the songs make it extremely enjoyable.

  • Nov 18, 2018

    It doesn’t give a lot of entertainment to audiences

    It doesn’t give a lot of entertainment to audiences

  • Oct 13, 2018

    beautiful animation.

    beautiful animation.