After Hours Reviews

  • Jun 18, 2020

    You could almost compare this to the zany 90s stuff the Coen Brothers did but Scorsese goes deeper here than just shallow entertainment (not to say Coens are shallow.) This has all the intricate details of his more elaborate films ("Goodfellas," "The Irishman," "Taxi Driver") just with a layer of exuberance and playfulness to it. Griffin Dunne is really the entire show here. His performance either makes or breaks the entire film and he's absolutely the perfect amount of Chaplin-esque and every-man, which is a very hard thing to pull off. One of Scorsese's best in my opinion.

    You could almost compare this to the zany 90s stuff the Coen Brothers did but Scorsese goes deeper here than just shallow entertainment (not to say Coens are shallow.) This has all the intricate details of his more elaborate films ("Goodfellas," "The Irishman," "Taxi Driver") just with a layer of exuberance and playfulness to it. Griffin Dunne is really the entire show here. His performance either makes or breaks the entire film and he's absolutely the perfect amount of Chaplin-esque and every-man, which is a very hard thing to pull off. One of Scorsese's best in my opinion.

  • May 30, 2020

    Underrated Scorsese flick. 7.75/10.

    Underrated Scorsese flick. 7.75/10.

  • May 21, 2020

    I’m sorry Martin Scorsese but this movie was boring and I simply didn’t care.

    I’m sorry Martin Scorsese but this movie was boring and I simply didn’t care.

  • Apr 26, 2020

    A peculiar story worth watching. Very 1980s, in hair, music, manner of speak. It's such a throwback. Keeps you on the edge of your seat.

    A peculiar story worth watching. Very 1980s, in hair, music, manner of speak. It's such a throwback. Keeps you on the edge of your seat.

  • Mar 29, 2020

    Weighed down by Griffin Dunne's persistently unlikable performance, After Hours is reminiscent of contemporary films like Into the Night and Desperately Seeking Susan, but is worse than both of them by a long shot. Though skillfully directed by Martin Scorsese and featuring interesting supporting performances by Teri Garr and Linda Fiorentino, the success of After Hours ultimately rests on Dunne making the audience sympathize with his character's incredible string of coincidental bad luck, and unfortunately I was rooting for Catherine O'Hara's lynch mob to catch him in the end.

    Weighed down by Griffin Dunne's persistently unlikable performance, After Hours is reminiscent of contemporary films like Into the Night and Desperately Seeking Susan, but is worse than both of them by a long shot. Though skillfully directed by Martin Scorsese and featuring interesting supporting performances by Teri Garr and Linda Fiorentino, the success of After Hours ultimately rests on Dunne making the audience sympathize with his character's incredible string of coincidental bad luck, and unfortunately I was rooting for Catherine O'Hara's lynch mob to catch him in the end.

  • Feb 28, 2020

    A weird tragicomic Odyssey set over a night in SoHo, New York. The universe conspires against the protagonist, who faces misfortune after misfortune until they all come full circle to haunt him again and more vehemently. The movie is so crazy and extreme that the plot is often stretched to accomodate the next mishap occurring to our poor man, becoming so frustrating to watch. But it's a good frustration, that teaches us one of the most important virtues: patience.

    A weird tragicomic Odyssey set over a night in SoHo, New York. The universe conspires against the protagonist, who faces misfortune after misfortune until they all come full circle to haunt him again and more vehemently. The movie is so crazy and extreme that the plot is often stretched to accomodate the next mishap occurring to our poor man, becoming so frustrating to watch. But it's a good frustration, that teaches us one of the most important virtues: patience.

  • Feb 19, 2020

    Worst night ever lmao

    Worst night ever lmao

  • Oct 05, 2019

    After Hours is a dizzying and hilarious black comedy.

    After Hours is a dizzying and hilarious black comedy.

  • Oct 02, 2019

    "After Hours" is Scorsese's most forgotten film with a general public, and arguably his most beloved with cult movie fans who are mostly apathetic towards his gangster genre obsession. "After Hours" is a magnificently funny and bizarrely sexy yuppie revenge flick based in a nightmarish SoHo (Scorsese's vision). It's not what you'd expect from the king of Italian gangster movies -- it's deliciously weird!

    "After Hours" is Scorsese's most forgotten film with a general public, and arguably his most beloved with cult movie fans who are mostly apathetic towards his gangster genre obsession. "After Hours" is a magnificently funny and bizarrely sexy yuppie revenge flick based in a nightmarish SoHo (Scorsese's vision). It's not what you'd expect from the king of Italian gangster movies -- it's deliciously weird!

  • Jul 18, 2019

    I tend to despise comedy films that take a likable protagonist and then torture him for hours and we’re supposed to laugh at his misfortune. I simply can’t take that journey because, once I empathize with a character, it’s a painful experience to watch them suffer. After Hours combatted that in a couple of ways, and surprisingly bucked the trend to become a movie I quite enjoyed. The first thing this movie does is establish Griffin Dunne’s character as a somewhat unpleasant person. It’s not that he’s a total jerk and deserving of a miserable night, but he’s not totally innocent either. The other thing that worked for me in After Hours is the gradual build to the night. It starts out just odd instead of awful, and then as the night progresses things get out of control. By the time it’s all so bad it feels like a nightmare, I’m laughing and wondering how it got to this point. Explaining jokes and why I found them funny is a surefire way to take all the humor out of them, so I won’t go into any more minutiae about what made me laugh in After Hours. But I will talk about the style of comedy. It’s interesting because a lot of this “guy who can’t catch a break” comedy feels like something I’d see in a goofier movie, like Police Academy or even Naked Gun. However, in the hands of Scorsese, it takes on a more serious tone. The world around Griffin Dunne feels so real that the insane things that happen to him almost seem logical. It makes some of the more farcical moments feel a little out of place, but I was willing to accept it since this is a comedy. After Hours reminded me a lot of a slightly more adult and gritty version of Adventures in Babysitting (a favorite of mine.) It might not be one of the greatest comedies of all time, but I enjoyed it more than I expected, and would gladly go on that ride again.

    I tend to despise comedy films that take a likable protagonist and then torture him for hours and we’re supposed to laugh at his misfortune. I simply can’t take that journey because, once I empathize with a character, it’s a painful experience to watch them suffer. After Hours combatted that in a couple of ways, and surprisingly bucked the trend to become a movie I quite enjoyed. The first thing this movie does is establish Griffin Dunne’s character as a somewhat unpleasant person. It’s not that he’s a total jerk and deserving of a miserable night, but he’s not totally innocent either. The other thing that worked for me in After Hours is the gradual build to the night. It starts out just odd instead of awful, and then as the night progresses things get out of control. By the time it’s all so bad it feels like a nightmare, I’m laughing and wondering how it got to this point. Explaining jokes and why I found them funny is a surefire way to take all the humor out of them, so I won’t go into any more minutiae about what made me laugh in After Hours. But I will talk about the style of comedy. It’s interesting because a lot of this “guy who can’t catch a break” comedy feels like something I’d see in a goofier movie, like Police Academy or even Naked Gun. However, in the hands of Scorsese, it takes on a more serious tone. The world around Griffin Dunne feels so real that the insane things that happen to him almost seem logical. It makes some of the more farcical moments feel a little out of place, but I was willing to accept it since this is a comedy. After Hours reminded me a lot of a slightly more adult and gritty version of Adventures in Babysitting (a favorite of mine.) It might not be one of the greatest comedies of all time, but I enjoyed it more than I expected, and would gladly go on that ride again.