The Killer Reviews

  • Aug 26, 2019

    John Wu is a genius, definitely John Wick and Die Hard created from emotions from John Wu films. Recommend this one^^

    John Wu is a genius, definitely John Wick and Die Hard created from emotions from John Wu films. Recommend this one^^

  • Aug 23, 2019

    Absolutely incredible gun fight scenes with pretty good story. Must have kinda one.

    Absolutely incredible gun fight scenes with pretty good story. Must have kinda one.

  • Aug 15, 2019

    The hitman with a heart of gold. I love it when tough assassin-like characters can shoe compassion even when they're job is to kill people. It makes them seems more human and less of a killing machine. That scene with the Inspector, his partner and the hitman when they're at Jenny's apartment was brilliant. A great action movie on the surface but on a deeper level, a movie about friendship and doing the right thing. Pretty dramatic ending with an insane amount of violence and action.

    The hitman with a heart of gold. I love it when tough assassin-like characters can shoe compassion even when they're job is to kill people. It makes them seems more human and less of a killing machine. That scene with the Inspector, his partner and the hitman when they're at Jenny's apartment was brilliant. A great action movie on the surface but on a deeper level, a movie about friendship and doing the right thing. Pretty dramatic ending with an insane amount of violence and action.

  • Jun 17, 2019

    I always love the sound of the extracted bullet as it drops into the metal container; it wouldn't be the same if it was plastic. Although the film is a classic, good for it's time it hasn't stood the test of time very well. It relies heavily on the magic gun syndrome with guns that blaze on and on without having to be reloaded which always irritates me. The song is lovely. I find with this type of Japanese film the overacting can be a bit melodramatic too. I much prefer Yun-Fat's Bulletproof Monk to this.

    I always love the sound of the extracted bullet as it drops into the metal container; it wouldn't be the same if it was plastic. Although the film is a classic, good for it's time it hasn't stood the test of time very well. It relies heavily on the magic gun syndrome with guns that blaze on and on without having to be reloaded which always irritates me. The song is lovely. I find with this type of Japanese film the overacting can be a bit melodramatic too. I much prefer Yun-Fat's Bulletproof Monk to this.

  • May 25, 2019

    One of the best movies ever! definitely in my top 5 and I prefer this movie over Hard Boiled because The Killer has a better pace to it and the story is more interesting, so yeah I will give this awesometacular movie 5 stars!

    One of the best movies ever! definitely in my top 5 and I prefer this movie over Hard Boiled because The Killer has a better pace to it and the story is more interesting, so yeah I will give this awesometacular movie 5 stars!

  • Aug 14, 2018

    The Killer is about an assassin who experiences a problem while killing one target, so he decides to quit, but only after he performs one more job. Meanwhile he’s being pursued by a police officer who might just kill him first. I loved the dynamic of the relationship between the two leads. I’ve always been a fan of those movie friendships where the guys have every reason to hate one another, but they can’t help but find a mutual respect. Chow Yun-Fat and Danny Lee were awesome in the lead roles, and are able to sell this nuanced relationship. It took a little time, but I was able to sympathize with both of them despite some of the crazy or awful things they do, which is necessary for buying into the story. As with all John Woo movies, The Killer takes place in a heightened reality. Every person has multiple guns, and typically they’ll fire two of them at a time. Of course everyone needs all those guns because in this world it takes 15 to 20 bullets just to kill someone. Doves live in almost every building ready to fly away at any moment. Also, most things are highly flammable and/or explosive in the John Woo universe. It can all get a little comical, particularly in a film like this where he is writer and director so there’s no one holding him back. Perhaps the funniest moments are the overlong stand-offs. It seems Woo is a big fan of the old Sergio Leone Westerns, and he wants to emulate them almost to a fault. Despite the fact that the director elevates The Killer to a level of camp that is almost too much, it’s still enjoyable to watch. The story is decent, and I was invested in it enough to see how it would end. There are aspects that are over-the-top, and it doesn’t conform to the logical reality we live in, but it’s just a movie so sometimes I have to let that stuff go. My only other struggle with the film, aside from trying to silence my logical brain, was the awkward dubbing or dialog replacement. I watched it in the original language with subtitles, and yet it still didn’t seem that any of those words were actually coming out of their mouths. It’s hard to watch and kind of off-putting. That being said, I still enjoyed the adventure of The Killer, and I would be happy to explore more of John Woo’s filmography prior to his work in the US.

    The Killer is about an assassin who experiences a problem while killing one target, so he decides to quit, but only after he performs one more job. Meanwhile he’s being pursued by a police officer who might just kill him first. I loved the dynamic of the relationship between the two leads. I’ve always been a fan of those movie friendships where the guys have every reason to hate one another, but they can’t help but find a mutual respect. Chow Yun-Fat and Danny Lee were awesome in the lead roles, and are able to sell this nuanced relationship. It took a little time, but I was able to sympathize with both of them despite some of the crazy or awful things they do, which is necessary for buying into the story. As with all John Woo movies, The Killer takes place in a heightened reality. Every person has multiple guns, and typically they’ll fire two of them at a time. Of course everyone needs all those guns because in this world it takes 15 to 20 bullets just to kill someone. Doves live in almost every building ready to fly away at any moment. Also, most things are highly flammable and/or explosive in the John Woo universe. It can all get a little comical, particularly in a film like this where he is writer and director so there’s no one holding him back. Perhaps the funniest moments are the overlong stand-offs. It seems Woo is a big fan of the old Sergio Leone Westerns, and he wants to emulate them almost to a fault. Despite the fact that the director elevates The Killer to a level of camp that is almost too much, it’s still enjoyable to watch. The story is decent, and I was invested in it enough to see how it would end. There are aspects that are over-the-top, and it doesn’t conform to the logical reality we live in, but it’s just a movie so sometimes I have to let that stuff go. My only other struggle with the film, aside from trying to silence my logical brain, was the awkward dubbing or dialog replacement. I watched it in the original language with subtitles, and yet it still didn’t seem that any of those words were actually coming out of their mouths. It’s hard to watch and kind of off-putting. That being said, I still enjoyed the adventure of The Killer, and I would be happy to explore more of John Woo’s filmography prior to his work in the US.

  • Jul 01, 2018

    John Woo's first major production is about an assassin who falls for a girl he accidentally blinded during a gunfight and takes one last job in order to get her eyes replaced. He spends most of the movie being tailed by a cop who eventually befriends him. The gunfights are large and exciting but the choreography isn't all there and there's not quite as much acrobatics as the much better Hard Boiled. Nonetheless, if only for a mid-movie scene where the cop and assassin train guns on each other for six or seven minutes while holding a conversation with the blind girl, it's a worthwhile watch if you're big into action movies and want to see something unique.

    John Woo's first major production is about an assassin who falls for a girl he accidentally blinded during a gunfight and takes one last job in order to get her eyes replaced. He spends most of the movie being tailed by a cop who eventually befriends him. The gunfights are large and exciting but the choreography isn't all there and there's not quite as much acrobatics as the much better Hard Boiled. Nonetheless, if only for a mid-movie scene where the cop and assassin train guns on each other for six or seven minutes while holding a conversation with the blind girl, it's a worthwhile watch if you're big into action movies and want to see something unique.

  • Feb 15, 2018

    John Woo is a master of the action genre and this film is a blast. The gunfights in this film are just stunning. The detail and in your face nature of the action sequences blows away most of the stuff coming out now.

    John Woo is a master of the action genre and this film is a blast. The gunfights in this film are just stunning. The detail and in your face nature of the action sequences blows away most of the stuff coming out now.

  • Oct 06, 2017

    When you need a good dose of action, try watching this. You won't be disappointed!

    When you need a good dose of action, try watching this. You won't be disappointed!

  • May 16, 2017

    Back in the day, I really enjoyed the movies of John Woo - so much so that I think I went and saw Hard Target (1993; with JCVD) in the theatre. But years have passed and Woo's profile has dropped; originally, he was touted as a grand stylist of action; in Hollywood he was reduced to making a Lost in Space TV movie; now he is back in China making grand epics. He seems to have lost his personal style which paid homage to Melville and the honour among men (thieves or cops or both). The Killer was the centrepiece of his oeuvre up to that point, starring Chow Yun-Fat and Danny Lee as hitman and cop, respectively, who form a bond over a blinded nightclub singer. Woo brought all of his stylistic trademarks to bear, with slow-motion flying doves in a church, syrupy Cantonese music, Mexican stand-offs galore, and some very sensitive tough guys trying to follow their feelings while also unleashing lovingly choreographed ultraviolence on anyone in their way. Possibly due to the fact that I watched a version of the film with dubious discontinuous subtitles, it just didn't resonate with me the same way this time. However, my recent rewatches of Hard Boiled (1992) - 4 stars, and A Better Tomorrow (1986) - 4 1/2 stars, suggest that Woo did have the goods. Perhaps I've been too hard on The Killer this time? Melville's Le Samourai (a key inspiration) is a personal favourite (not sure how that might influence my verdict).

    Back in the day, I really enjoyed the movies of John Woo - so much so that I think I went and saw Hard Target (1993; with JCVD) in the theatre. But years have passed and Woo's profile has dropped; originally, he was touted as a grand stylist of action; in Hollywood he was reduced to making a Lost in Space TV movie; now he is back in China making grand epics. He seems to have lost his personal style which paid homage to Melville and the honour among men (thieves or cops or both). The Killer was the centrepiece of his oeuvre up to that point, starring Chow Yun-Fat and Danny Lee as hitman and cop, respectively, who form a bond over a blinded nightclub singer. Woo brought all of his stylistic trademarks to bear, with slow-motion flying doves in a church, syrupy Cantonese music, Mexican stand-offs galore, and some very sensitive tough guys trying to follow their feelings while also unleashing lovingly choreographed ultraviolence on anyone in their way. Possibly due to the fact that I watched a version of the film with dubious discontinuous subtitles, it just didn't resonate with me the same way this time. However, my recent rewatches of Hard Boiled (1992) - 4 stars, and A Better Tomorrow (1986) - 4 1/2 stars, suggest that Woo did have the goods. Perhaps I've been too hard on The Killer this time? Melville's Le Samourai (a key inspiration) is a personal favourite (not sure how that might influence my verdict).