Cyrano De Bergerac Reviews

  • May 10, 2019

    What stands out a lot in Cyrano de Bergerac is the English translation that you’ll read in the subtitles. Someone painstakingly translated the language from French into poetic English including complex rhyming schemes and everything. I’m not a big fan of poetry, so at times it was a detriment to my enjoyment of the film, because it almost felt like the subtitles were still in a foreign language. However, I have to respect the amount of effort they put into this, and there are scenes where the language feels so magical and accentuates the emotion of the moment. The famous balcony scene is a great example, and shows the power of words that drive the plot of the entire story. I like the complexities of the romance in Cyrano de Bergerac, and I thought Anne Brochet was quite excellent as the object of everyone’s affection. There are some strong emotional scenes, and I was touched by the way things unfold. However, I’m not sure Gerard Depardieu was perfect for the role of Cyrano in this film. While he has the acting ability, at this time in his life, he had a bit of extra weight he was carrying around and it doesn’t look right on an unmatched swordsman. It looks even worse in some of the later scenes when his army is starving to death in a siege, and he has packed on the pounds. My other problems with the film mostly relate to the story, and I suspect I’d have to take these complaints to Edmond Rostand who wrote the original play, because it’s not really the fault of the filmmakers. First of all, I know it’s a thing of its time and familial relationships were a little different back in those days, but hearing this man constantly pining after his cousin creeps me out. My other big struggle was with the ending. It is horribly anticlimactic and unsatisfying. I still respect Cyrano de Bergerac, and it is the kind of story I’d like to see adapted again or watch on stage. I think there’s a film in here I could love, but just a few things holding it back for me.

    What stands out a lot in Cyrano de Bergerac is the English translation that you’ll read in the subtitles. Someone painstakingly translated the language from French into poetic English including complex rhyming schemes and everything. I’m not a big fan of poetry, so at times it was a detriment to my enjoyment of the film, because it almost felt like the subtitles were still in a foreign language. However, I have to respect the amount of effort they put into this, and there are scenes where the language feels so magical and accentuates the emotion of the moment. The famous balcony scene is a great example, and shows the power of words that drive the plot of the entire story. I like the complexities of the romance in Cyrano de Bergerac, and I thought Anne Brochet was quite excellent as the object of everyone’s affection. There are some strong emotional scenes, and I was touched by the way things unfold. However, I’m not sure Gerard Depardieu was perfect for the role of Cyrano in this film. While he has the acting ability, at this time in his life, he had a bit of extra weight he was carrying around and it doesn’t look right on an unmatched swordsman. It looks even worse in some of the later scenes when his army is starving to death in a siege, and he has packed on the pounds. My other problems with the film mostly relate to the story, and I suspect I’d have to take these complaints to Edmond Rostand who wrote the original play, because it’s not really the fault of the filmmakers. First of all, I know it’s a thing of its time and familial relationships were a little different back in those days, but hearing this man constantly pining after his cousin creeps me out. My other big struggle was with the ending. It is horribly anticlimactic and unsatisfying. I still respect Cyrano de Bergerac, and it is the kind of story I’d like to see adapted again or watch on stage. I think there’s a film in here I could love, but just a few things holding it back for me.

  • Feb 27, 2019

    After watching it in a few languages, I've read the original play by Rostand and I think that this is one of the very few movies, where translation stands out. The German transcript is a playful masterpiece.

    After watching it in a few languages, I've read the original play by Rostand and I think that this is one of the very few movies, where translation stands out. The German transcript is a playful masterpiece.

  • Jan 22, 2019

    Every time I think at Cyrano de Bergerac, the face of Gerard Depardieu pops up too.

    Every time I think at Cyrano de Bergerac, the face of Gerard Depardieu pops up too.

  • Jun 06, 2018

    The film is a tour-de-force of everything with the pillar being the play itself with its poetic verses. The film made me regret that I don't understand the French language, I can only imagine how it all sounds in the original tongue. I also have to commend the cinematography in this film, it's so perfect that it actually is a one whole with the ambience of the play. O European culture, I'm so glad you have such riches to be plunged in. It must have been a great pleasure for all actors involved to perform in this masterpiece, I'm sure such a material must be a treasure for real artists.

    The film is a tour-de-force of everything with the pillar being the play itself with its poetic verses. The film made me regret that I don't understand the French language, I can only imagine how it all sounds in the original tongue. I also have to commend the cinematography in this film, it's so perfect that it actually is a one whole with the ambience of the play. O European culture, I'm so glad you have such riches to be plunged in. It must have been a great pleasure for all actors involved to perform in this masterpiece, I'm sure such a material must be a treasure for real artists.

  • Nov 17, 2016

    This movie is an excellent production of a somewhat cheesy novel. Gerard Depardieu delivers an amazing performance in a role no one would think he could embody. Great film all around.

    This movie is an excellent production of a somewhat cheesy novel. Gerard Depardieu delivers an amazing performance in a role no one would think he could embody. Great film all around.

  • Apr 06, 2016

    Rostand's play,"Cyrano de Bergerac" is brought to life in this wonderful film. I consider it a perfect visualization of the story with NO stupid Hollywood drivel detracting from and debasing the lessons of the original work.

    Rostand's play,"Cyrano de Bergerac" is brought to life in this wonderful film. I consider it a perfect visualization of the story with NO stupid Hollywood drivel detracting from and debasing the lessons of the original work.

  • Mar 10, 2016

    Intricate level of detail accompanies this thought provoking tragedy; unfortunately, so does a crumbly third act and flat secondary characters

    Intricate level of detail accompanies this thought provoking tragedy; unfortunately, so does a crumbly third act and flat secondary characters

  • Jim H Super Reviewer
    Apr 29, 2015

    Edmond Rostand's classic story comes to life in this 1990 adaptation. Gerard Depardieu has recently become a parody of himself, the fat Frenchman who drinks a vineyard and a half every day, and that makes it easy to forget how energetic, poetic, and compelling he once was. He gives a tour de force performance in this film, actually challenging Jose Ferrer for the best Cyrano. The problem with story is that it's hard to believe that a man as arrogant as Cyrano wouldn't try to sink or swim with Roxanne on his merits. So there has to be an element of self-conscious insecurity to his scenes with her, and while that's not altogether missing from Depardieu's performance, it's still not clear why Cyrano wouldn't pursue her on his own behalf. Vincent Perez actually brings a strength to the hapless role of Christian. Overall, this is one of the best versions of a classic story.

    Edmond Rostand's classic story comes to life in this 1990 adaptation. Gerard Depardieu has recently become a parody of himself, the fat Frenchman who drinks a vineyard and a half every day, and that makes it easy to forget how energetic, poetic, and compelling he once was. He gives a tour de force performance in this film, actually challenging Jose Ferrer for the best Cyrano. The problem with story is that it's hard to believe that a man as arrogant as Cyrano wouldn't try to sink or swim with Roxanne on his merits. So there has to be an element of self-conscious insecurity to his scenes with her, and while that's not altogether missing from Depardieu's performance, it's still not clear why Cyrano wouldn't pursue her on his own behalf. Vincent Perez actually brings a strength to the hapless role of Christian. Overall, this is one of the best versions of a classic story.

  • Jul 07, 2014

    Earning Gerard Depardieu an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, Cyrano de Bergerac sounded like a great chance to experience world cinema. As Cyrano de Bergerac is an adaptation of a play turned into a film, it has limited appeal to me because I am not very big on theatrical productions. And plus with all the glamourous focus on imagery, it largely seems like the film is a costume drama which similarly is not a particular genre I am fond of. But the passion in the film is undeniable. Despite being a costume drama which is largely Shakespearian and built around a tale of tragic romance, Cyrano de Bergerac takes all the best elements from these aspects and crafts a story which is touching and sentimental, if somewhat long and slow. Cyrano de Bergerac is a film which you'd think I wouldn't like, but I loved it. Despite the romantic premise being a rather overused one, considering that it came from 1897 you can't complain too much as it being transferred into modern day cinema is done quite effectively. A lot of what is told in the story is really a touching sentiment, and even though the story in the film seems a bit repetitive, there is a lot of love in it. Director Jean-Paul Rappeneau really pours his heart into the film and succeeds in making it a magnificent spectacle of French cinema as well as being a touching dramatic piece. He makes use of a strong script that brings along a lot of the insightful concepts from the original play and turns them into well placed explorations of characters and emotions. The script itself is brilliant because it brings a lot of strong characters to the film and then puts them in a variation of emotionally complex situations which Jean-Paul Rappeneau maintains with ease. He puts a lot of heart into the film which ensures that the material flourishes and ends up rich in atmosphere, making it both an enjoyable viewing and a dramatically powerful one. As an adaptation of a stage play, Cyrano de Bergerac is brilliant. While the film has enough amazing visual elements to be a grand spectacle of a film, the cast in the film all follow a traditionally theatrical style of acting. It is difficult for a film to maintain a large scale as a focus on its political context and also a small scale to put emphasis on the relevance of the characters and their relationships, but it ends up directed to easy success under the firm hand of Jean-Paul Rappeneau. He makes it a beautiful film, and the fact that it did not win the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film when it is so worthy of it and scored many other nominations really comes as a surprise to me. It must have had some serious competition in 1990. Cyrano de Bergerac is also packed with memorable imagery thanks to the beautiful nature of the scenery and fine production design, as well as the Academy Award winning costumes. It all helps to easily establish the time period and setting of the film easily, and it is all captured with incredibly well placed cinematography. Cyrano de Bergerac is a magnificent visual spectacle which helps to elevate the film beyond some of its narrative limitations. The musical score of the film is also wonderful as it gives the feature a large scaled atmosphere and it dramatizes a lot of the moments really well. The entire film is excellently stylish, and it justifies adapting the text to cinematic screen really easily. Cyrano de Bergerac is a magnificent example of a great play adaptation which is on par with Kenneth Branagh's excellent adaptation of Henry V from the prior year with stylish and dramatic power which comes fiercley close. But one of the most truly brilliant aspects of Cyrano de Bergerac is the leading performance of Gerard Depardieu. Gerard Depardieu truly commands the screen in Cyrano de Bergerac. His performance is ripe with excellent theatrical skill along the lines of Shakespearian quality, yet with a more humane level of subtlety to it. He crafts an engaging character out of protagonist because you can tell that he just truly loves the role. He anchors the heart of the film with his remarkable performance in the titular role. It is a truly marvellous performance because it is so beautifully theatrical with incredibly dramatic line delivery and physical involvement that it is unforgettable. In a performance easily worthy of an Academy Award nomination, Gerard Depardieu delivers a performance which is just magnificent. Whenever he is present on screen he finds a way to draw audiences in because he brings a lot of sympathy to the role, and his line delivery is consistently energetic with physical movements. He says his words with maximum involvement in the role to the extent that it is practically poetic, and it is perfectly theatrical without being too melodramatic to pass on cinematic terms. Gerard Depardieu's performance is one of the greatest things about Cyrano de Bergerac which ensures that it is touching on a human level and memorable for its cast. Vincent Perez also makes a memorable effort. As the young and naive Christian de Neuvillette, Vincent Perez has a lot of confident charisma in his part during the right scenes while maintaining appropriate uncertainty in others. He stands strong in the role with a natural charm and maintains a strong chemistry with Gerard Depardieu. His involvement in the role is determined and well spirited which makes him a truly genial presence, so he makes a fine addition to the cast in Cyrano de Bergerac with his handsome demeanour rendering him a likable figure. Anne Brochet also provides a sympathetic performance. So despite its extensive length and slow pace, Cyrano de Bergerac maintains all the finest dramatic elements of its theatrical roots while having enough style to succeed as a cinematic spectacle which renders it a well-acted and colourful costume drama led by a magnificent performance from Gerard Depardieu.

    Earning Gerard Depardieu an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, Cyrano de Bergerac sounded like a great chance to experience world cinema. As Cyrano de Bergerac is an adaptation of a play turned into a film, it has limited appeal to me because I am not very big on theatrical productions. And plus with all the glamourous focus on imagery, it largely seems like the film is a costume drama which similarly is not a particular genre I am fond of. But the passion in the film is undeniable. Despite being a costume drama which is largely Shakespearian and built around a tale of tragic romance, Cyrano de Bergerac takes all the best elements from these aspects and crafts a story which is touching and sentimental, if somewhat long and slow. Cyrano de Bergerac is a film which you'd think I wouldn't like, but I loved it. Despite the romantic premise being a rather overused one, considering that it came from 1897 you can't complain too much as it being transferred into modern day cinema is done quite effectively. A lot of what is told in the story is really a touching sentiment, and even though the story in the film seems a bit repetitive, there is a lot of love in it. Director Jean-Paul Rappeneau really pours his heart into the film and succeeds in making it a magnificent spectacle of French cinema as well as being a touching dramatic piece. He makes use of a strong script that brings along a lot of the insightful concepts from the original play and turns them into well placed explorations of characters and emotions. The script itself is brilliant because it brings a lot of strong characters to the film and then puts them in a variation of emotionally complex situations which Jean-Paul Rappeneau maintains with ease. He puts a lot of heart into the film which ensures that the material flourishes and ends up rich in atmosphere, making it both an enjoyable viewing and a dramatically powerful one. As an adaptation of a stage play, Cyrano de Bergerac is brilliant. While the film has enough amazing visual elements to be a grand spectacle of a film, the cast in the film all follow a traditionally theatrical style of acting. It is difficult for a film to maintain a large scale as a focus on its political context and also a small scale to put emphasis on the relevance of the characters and their relationships, but it ends up directed to easy success under the firm hand of Jean-Paul Rappeneau. He makes it a beautiful film, and the fact that it did not win the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film when it is so worthy of it and scored many other nominations really comes as a surprise to me. It must have had some serious competition in 1990. Cyrano de Bergerac is also packed with memorable imagery thanks to the beautiful nature of the scenery and fine production design, as well as the Academy Award winning costumes. It all helps to easily establish the time period and setting of the film easily, and it is all captured with incredibly well placed cinematography. Cyrano de Bergerac is a magnificent visual spectacle which helps to elevate the film beyond some of its narrative limitations. The musical score of the film is also wonderful as it gives the feature a large scaled atmosphere and it dramatizes a lot of the moments really well. The entire film is excellently stylish, and it justifies adapting the text to cinematic screen really easily. Cyrano de Bergerac is a magnificent example of a great play adaptation which is on par with Kenneth Branagh's excellent adaptation of Henry V from the prior year with stylish and dramatic power which comes fiercley close. But one of the most truly brilliant aspects of Cyrano de Bergerac is the leading performance of Gerard Depardieu. Gerard Depardieu truly commands the screen in Cyrano de Bergerac. His performance is ripe with excellent theatrical skill along the lines of Shakespearian quality, yet with a more humane level of subtlety to it. He crafts an engaging character out of protagonist because you can tell that he just truly loves the role. He anchors the heart of the film with his remarkable performance in the titular role. It is a truly marvellous performance because it is so beautifully theatrical with incredibly dramatic line delivery and physical involvement that it is unforgettable. In a performance easily worthy of an Academy Award nomination, Gerard Depardieu delivers a performance which is just magnificent. Whenever he is present on screen he finds a way to draw audiences in because he brings a lot of sympathy to the role, and his line delivery is consistently energetic with physical movements. He says his words with maximum involvement in the role to the extent that it is practically poetic, and it is perfectly theatrical without being too melodramatic to pass on cinematic terms. Gerard Depardieu's performance is one of the greatest things about Cyrano de Bergerac which ensures that it is touching on a human level and memorable for its cast. Vincent Perez also makes a memorable effort. As the young and naive Christian de Neuvillette, Vincent Perez has a lot of confident charisma in his part during the right scenes while maintaining appropriate uncertainty in others. He stands strong in the role with a natural charm and maintains a strong chemistry with Gerard Depardieu. His involvement in the role is determined and well spirited which makes him a truly genial presence, so he makes a fine addition to the cast in Cyrano de Bergerac with his handsome demeanour rendering him a likable figure. Anne Brochet also provides a sympathetic performance. So despite its extensive length and slow pace, Cyrano de Bergerac maintains all the finest dramatic elements of its theatrical roots while having enough style to succeed as a cinematic spectacle which renders it a well-acted and colourful costume drama led by a magnificent performance from Gerard Depardieu.

  • Mar 21, 2014

    The movie captures the original text's spirit magnificently, with its soft-hearted delight, momentum of action and vigour already invoked by the soundtrack in the opening credits. Dépardieu is a true Cyrano here and plays his role with convincing force and panache. However, the production is sometimes over-acted and contains some clichéd scenes.

    The movie captures the original text's spirit magnificently, with its soft-hearted delight, momentum of action and vigour already invoked by the soundtrack in the opening credits. Dépardieu is a true Cyrano here and plays his role with convincing force and panache. However, the production is sometimes over-acted and contains some clichéd scenes.