Drácula (Dracula, Spanish Version) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Drácula (Dracula, Spanish Version) Reviews

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January 23, 2013
Better than the Browning version.
January 23, 2013
Great movie i am very surprised in how much more they showed within the movie than the original Dracula. The major difference is Bela Lugosi look and the assistant they both are great in their own ways wonderful movie give it a try if you know Spanish or find one with English subtitles.
January 22, 2013
SPANISH DRACULA! Better directed than the English, but the Spanish Dracula actor is terrible.
½ January 16, 2013
The extra half hour does not help the pacing issues, and Bela Lugosi's replacement obviously can't compare.
½ December 5, 2012
Villar­as hams it up but at least he doesn't look like he'd rather be somewhere else like Lugosi and most of the other actors in the English-language version.
½ October 27, 2012
Excellent version of the Horror classic
October 25, 2012
The Spanish version of Dracula is a very fascinating film. Carlos Villarías isn't quite as haunting as Bela Lugosi but he's still oddly charismatic.
½ October 22, 2012
Same film, but in Spanish, and completely re-taped.
October 15, 2012
El director George Melford utiliza los mismos escenarios que el director Tod Browning uso para su version de "Dracula" y nos presenta su version en espanol, cuyas actuaciones son terribles, pero su atmosfera genuinamente aterradora.
August 4, 2012
Yes, it is true what they say. This one is scarier than the English version.
½ July 22, 2012
This film is great it was made the same year when the great American film was realesed this film was
Forgotten but wait now your probably at this film like oh it's just Dracula in Spanish but its not Dracula and renifeild are found to be terrifying the only reason to watch
This film is because of the cast
July 20, 2012
A bit better than the English language version, but the performance of Carlos Villarias isn't as memorable as Lugosi's.
½ May 30, 2012
Some maintain that this version is superior to the Bela Lugosi film, but I don't subscribe to that line of thought. The camera work is admittedly better and more dynamic, but the cast members - particularly Villarias, who hams it up as Dracula - are not as good as their opposite numbers, and the film is unfortunately overlong. That said, the mood is perfectly captured, and there are some interesting deviations from both the novel and the Lugosi version. Worth a look.
½ March 9, 2012
This Spanish-language version of Dracula was shot at the same time as the famous one starring Bela Lugosi. It uses the same story and sets, but for my money I'd say that this one is the better film. What really carries it is that all the actors seem really invested in their roles. (Especially Pablo Alvarez's over-the-top Renfield) While the lack of Lugosi does damage the atmosphere, everything else about this film clicks in the ways that its English-language cousin can't pull off.
January 15, 2012
I have it in my special edition of Brownin's Dracula, but haven't seen yet.
June 6, 2011
An improvement on the Tod Browning version with Bela Lugosi made at the same time using the same sets but entirely different actors.
December 17, 2010
Now when you think 'Dracula: The Spanish version" you say to yourself, "its Dracula dubbed in Spanish", actually its interesting to know that Universal was shooting foreign language versions of their films. Its a completely different movie with a different cast, director, and camera techniques, the shots were more visual than the Legosi version it kinda makes you wish that Legosi was in this movie.
November 28, 2010
Everything about the Spanish language version of 'Dracula' is superior to the original, EXCEPT (and this is a biggie) Dracula himself. Compared to Lugosi, the actor in this version is just plain hammy. You can't help but laugh at the guy. He's the only thing holding back a film that would otherwise be considered a masterpiece.
Horror Movie Project
Super Reviewer
November 12, 2010
The original 1931 Dracula that everyone knows stars Bela Lugosi. The film has become a staple in horror movies and is an undeniable classic among film fanatics. The movie elevated Universal to a household name and made it the studio to go to to get a horror movie made. Few people know, however, that the movie was filmed right alongside a Spanish language version with an entirely different cast. This parallel Dracula was directed by George Melford, starred Carlos Villarías, and is in many ways superior to its English version.

Let me give you a little background on the movie: When the original Dracula (the English version) was being filmed the studio decided that it would be a great idea to film a second version with an all Spanish speaking cast. The English version went on to get all of the fame, money, and girls. The Spanish version was left by the wayside, but the Spanish version of Dracula is much better in many respects. The movie had a lower budget and had to make up for the lack of "great" special effects with superior acting. The movie makes little tweaks here and there but is essentially the same story.

The movie's main focus is on the character Conde Dracula. Say that with me class, Con-de. Other characters went through a similar ethnic name change process as well including Juan Harker and Eva Seward. Dr. Van Helsing stayed the same though. I urge you not to dismiss this movie just because it is a forigen film; its not in English and they changed the names of some of the most well known characters in Gothic horror, but its still a fantastic film.

Its a wonder why they didn't just go ahead and dub over the original English version. It seems to me that they could of saved a lot of money that way. However, they did a great job and parts of this film surpass its English counterpart. Dracula gets a 8 out of 10 from me. The movie hits all of the right spots.

I felt very weak as if I had lost my virginity.

S!D
November 10, 2010
More atmospheric and considerably less dated then it's american counterpart, but Carlos Villarías is no Bela Lugosi. An interesting note for me was that the director, George Melford did not speak or understand Spanish but manages to get better production values, the camera work is better. Besides the over-the-top Carlos Villarías (who is still entertaining) Melford got great performances from the spanish cast and ended up making a more fuller, satisfying version of Dracula.
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