The Last of the Mohicans Reviews

  • 5d ago

    The film certainly hasn't aged well, and it certainly isn't among Daniel Day-Lewis' best work.

    The film certainly hasn't aged well, and it certainly isn't among Daniel Day-Lewis' best work.

  • Oct 21, 2019

    A great blend of violence romance and history.

    A great blend of violence romance and history.

  • Oct 20, 2019

    Muy favorito all Time movie!

    Muy favorito all Time movie!

  • Oct 05, 2019

    The story takes place in 1757, during the French and Indian War in the Adirondack Mountains, in the British colony of New York. British Army Major Duncan Heyward (Steven Waddington) arrives in Albany. He has been sent to serve under Colonel Edmund Munro, the commander of Fort William Henry. Heyward is given the task of escorting the colonel's two daughters, Cora (Madeleine Stowe) and Alice (Jodhi May), to their father. He is a family friend and in love with Cora. He proposes to her before they leave, but she does not give him an answer. Major Heyward, the two women, and a troop of British soldiers march through a rugged countryside, guided by Magua (Wes Studi), a Huron warrior. Magua leads the party into an ambush. Heyward and the women are rescued by the timely intervention of the Mohican chief Chingachgook (Russell Means), his son Uncas (Eric Schweig), and his white, adopted son Nathaniel Poe also known as "Hawkeye/La Longue Carabine", who kill all of the ambushers except Magua, who escapes. The rescuers agree to take the women and Heyward to the fort. During the fight, Hawkeye noticed that Magua attempted to kill Cora and asks Duncan if he knows why. During the trek, Cora and Hawkeye are attracted to each other, as are Uncas and Alice. When the party nears the fort, they find it under siege by the French and their Huron allies. The party manages to sneak in and are greeted by Colonel Munro, who asks Major Heyward about the requested, desperately needed reinforcements. While there, Cora and Hawkeye share a passionate kiss, and Heyward becomes jealous. In response, Cora finally tells him that she will not marry him. When Munro refuses to allow the militiamen to sneak away to defend their own families and homes, as he had earlier promised, Hawkeye arranges it anyway. He stays, however, and is condemned to be hanged for sedition. Before that can happen, during a parley, French general Louis-Joseph de Montcalm shows Munro an intercepted message which states that no reinforcements have been sent. Montcalm offers to allow the British to evacuate the fort with honor, keeping their weapons. Munro has little choice but to accept. However, Magua, a French ally, is furious at this arrangement. He harbors great hatred for Munro, blaming him for past wrongs done to him and his family. The following day, Colonel Munro, his soldiers, and their women and children leave the fort. Magua and his Huron warriors ambush them. During the battle, Magua personally kills Munro by cutting out his heart. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook fight their way out and lead Cora, Alice, and Heyward to temporary safety. Later, however, Magua captures the major and the women... "The Last of the Mohicans" opened with critics praising the film for its cinematography and music. Critic Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film three stars and called it "quite an improvement on Cooper's all but unreadable book, and a worthy successor to the Randolph Scott version," going on to say that "The Last of the Mohicans is not as authentic and uncompromised as it claims to be — more of a matinee fantasy than it wants to admit — but it is probably more entertaining as a result." Desson Howe of The Washington Post classified the film as "glam-opera" and "the MTV version of gothic romance". Rita Kempley of the Post recognized the "heavy drama," writing that the film "sets new standards when it comes to pent-up passion", but commented positively on the "spectacular scenery". Rotten Tomatoes consensus states: "The Last of the Mohicans is a breathless romantic adventure that plays loose with history -- and comes out with a richer action movie for it." Michael Mann´s movie adaptation of James Fenimore Cooper 1826 romantic novel is a beautiful epic historical actiondrama adventure with a great lead in Daniel Day-Lewis as Hawkeye/Nathaniel Poe or La Longue Carabine and beautiful Madeleine Stowe as Cora Munro. When re-seeing it today I reckon I would´ve wanted just a tad bit more of the film, but it is still a great film with striking cinematography and direction. And it´s set in historical period of my liking. We get the brutality, the beauty, the violence and the rivalries of the time period during the French and Indian War (1754–1763) which pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies. The film was originally scheduled for a summer 1992 release, as the teaser posters said, but when Michael Mann's first version clocked in at three hours, he was told by Fox to cut the film down and the release was postponed to September. Mann was never happy with the resulting two-hour version, feeling he had not had enough time to properly trim it, and so Fox allowed him to re-edit it entirely for the 1999 DVD release. Although only a few minutes longer, the new version features minor changes throughout the film. It is Mann's preferred version and the only one available on DVD in the US. "The Last of The Mohicans" is a great film that still holds up very well.

    The story takes place in 1757, during the French and Indian War in the Adirondack Mountains, in the British colony of New York. British Army Major Duncan Heyward (Steven Waddington) arrives in Albany. He has been sent to serve under Colonel Edmund Munro, the commander of Fort William Henry. Heyward is given the task of escorting the colonel's two daughters, Cora (Madeleine Stowe) and Alice (Jodhi May), to their father. He is a family friend and in love with Cora. He proposes to her before they leave, but she does not give him an answer. Major Heyward, the two women, and a troop of British soldiers march through a rugged countryside, guided by Magua (Wes Studi), a Huron warrior. Magua leads the party into an ambush. Heyward and the women are rescued by the timely intervention of the Mohican chief Chingachgook (Russell Means), his son Uncas (Eric Schweig), and his white, adopted son Nathaniel Poe also known as "Hawkeye/La Longue Carabine", who kill all of the ambushers except Magua, who escapes. The rescuers agree to take the women and Heyward to the fort. During the fight, Hawkeye noticed that Magua attempted to kill Cora and asks Duncan if he knows why. During the trek, Cora and Hawkeye are attracted to each other, as are Uncas and Alice. When the party nears the fort, they find it under siege by the French and their Huron allies. The party manages to sneak in and are greeted by Colonel Munro, who asks Major Heyward about the requested, desperately needed reinforcements. While there, Cora and Hawkeye share a passionate kiss, and Heyward becomes jealous. In response, Cora finally tells him that she will not marry him. When Munro refuses to allow the militiamen to sneak away to defend their own families and homes, as he had earlier promised, Hawkeye arranges it anyway. He stays, however, and is condemned to be hanged for sedition. Before that can happen, during a parley, French general Louis-Joseph de Montcalm shows Munro an intercepted message which states that no reinforcements have been sent. Montcalm offers to allow the British to evacuate the fort with honor, keeping their weapons. Munro has little choice but to accept. However, Magua, a French ally, is furious at this arrangement. He harbors great hatred for Munro, blaming him for past wrongs done to him and his family. The following day, Colonel Munro, his soldiers, and their women and children leave the fort. Magua and his Huron warriors ambush them. During the battle, Magua personally kills Munro by cutting out his heart. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook fight their way out and lead Cora, Alice, and Heyward to temporary safety. Later, however, Magua captures the major and the women... "The Last of the Mohicans" opened with critics praising the film for its cinematography and music. Critic Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film three stars and called it "quite an improvement on Cooper's all but unreadable book, and a worthy successor to the Randolph Scott version," going on to say that "The Last of the Mohicans is not as authentic and uncompromised as it claims to be — more of a matinee fantasy than it wants to admit — but it is probably more entertaining as a result." Desson Howe of The Washington Post classified the film as "glam-opera" and "the MTV version of gothic romance". Rita Kempley of the Post recognized the "heavy drama," writing that the film "sets new standards when it comes to pent-up passion", but commented positively on the "spectacular scenery". Rotten Tomatoes consensus states: "The Last of the Mohicans is a breathless romantic adventure that plays loose with history -- and comes out with a richer action movie for it." Michael Mann´s movie adaptation of James Fenimore Cooper 1826 romantic novel is a beautiful epic historical actiondrama adventure with a great lead in Daniel Day-Lewis as Hawkeye/Nathaniel Poe or La Longue Carabine and beautiful Madeleine Stowe as Cora Munro. When re-seeing it today I reckon I would´ve wanted just a tad bit more of the film, but it is still a great film with striking cinematography and direction. And it´s set in historical period of my liking. We get the brutality, the beauty, the violence and the rivalries of the time period during the French and Indian War (1754–1763) which pitted the colonies of British America against those of New France, each side supported by military units from the parent country and by American Indian allies. The film was originally scheduled for a summer 1992 release, as the teaser posters said, but when Michael Mann's first version clocked in at three hours, he was told by Fox to cut the film down and the release was postponed to September. Mann was never happy with the resulting two-hour version, feeling he had not had enough time to properly trim it, and so Fox allowed him to re-edit it entirely for the 1999 DVD release. Although only a few minutes longer, the new version features minor changes throughout the film. It is Mann's preferred version and the only one available on DVD in the US. "The Last of The Mohicans" is a great film that still holds up very well.

  • Jul 14, 2019

    best movie of the year!

    best movie of the year!

  • May 10, 2019

    I’ve never been very excited by war movies. It might stem from my lack of interest in history, which means I don’t get all that invested in these famous battles. As a result, it took me some time to start caring about the story in The Last of the Mohicans. What got me on board with the film was the characters and their more personal struggles. Taking the large scope of the French and Indian War down to a much smaller scale where it was all focused on personal relationships was much more effective. The love triangle isn’t written all that well, but at least it gives some strong motivation for the characters in the climax. I also appreciated how the primary villain wasn’t purely evil, he was just driven by an uncontrollable desire for vengeance. Even when some of the bigger things that were going on in the battle scenes didn’t work for me, I was still hooked because I wanted to see how they would resolve the plight of the main characters. The acting is quite good in The Last of the Mohicans, and I appreciated that they cast authentic Native American actors throughout the film. Daniel Day-Lewis appeared dangerous and powerful, so it worked for this role, although I was a little less connected to his romantic scenes. There were also a couple of sequences where we follow him and his family through a battle and it seems comical how everyone ignores them and they are able to run through without being harmed. It had an action movie vibe at times because the heroes were never touched by a bullet or blade and yet they never missed. Also like an action film, it was a breeze to watch, because there were not many lulls in the battle. The climax was the highlight of the entire film, because things really came to a head when all the central characters were brought together. It was dramatic and powerful, I just wish we had a little more time to meet a couple of the supporting characters so that their part in the story would be more emotionally impactful. The Last of the Mohicans is a good film, but it didn’t do enough to set itself apart from other war films in my mind. It’s one I’d like to watch again, though.

    I’ve never been very excited by war movies. It might stem from my lack of interest in history, which means I don’t get all that invested in these famous battles. As a result, it took me some time to start caring about the story in The Last of the Mohicans. What got me on board with the film was the characters and their more personal struggles. Taking the large scope of the French and Indian War down to a much smaller scale where it was all focused on personal relationships was much more effective. The love triangle isn’t written all that well, but at least it gives some strong motivation for the characters in the climax. I also appreciated how the primary villain wasn’t purely evil, he was just driven by an uncontrollable desire for vengeance. Even when some of the bigger things that were going on in the battle scenes didn’t work for me, I was still hooked because I wanted to see how they would resolve the plight of the main characters. The acting is quite good in The Last of the Mohicans, and I appreciated that they cast authentic Native American actors throughout the film. Daniel Day-Lewis appeared dangerous and powerful, so it worked for this role, although I was a little less connected to his romantic scenes. There were also a couple of sequences where we follow him and his family through a battle and it seems comical how everyone ignores them and they are able to run through without being harmed. It had an action movie vibe at times because the heroes were never touched by a bullet or blade and yet they never missed. Also like an action film, it was a breeze to watch, because there were not many lulls in the battle. The climax was the highlight of the entire film, because things really came to a head when all the central characters were brought together. It was dramatic and powerful, I just wish we had a little more time to meet a couple of the supporting characters so that their part in the story would be more emotionally impactful. The Last of the Mohicans is a good film, but it didn’t do enough to set itself apart from other war films in my mind. It’s one I’d like to watch again, though.

  • Apr 25, 2019

    This is one of the most flawless films I have ever seen. I love this movie so much, and I cannot think of a time that I wouldn't want to watch it. To clarify, this is not my favorite movie, but I'm sure for many people it is, and for good reason. It is so well done, that I'm not sure another attempt to film another movie about the book will ever happen.

    This is one of the most flawless films I have ever seen. I love this movie so much, and I cannot think of a time that I wouldn't want to watch it. To clarify, this is not my favorite movie, but I'm sure for many people it is, and for good reason. It is so well done, that I'm not sure another attempt to film another movie about the book will ever happen.

  • Apr 06, 2019

    Cover. Ambush. The Last Of The Mohicans Mann's ruffian ideology is undoubtedly tough and on the other hand is incredibly brittle. This political thriller that was aspired to be thought provoking feels like you tuned in a prime time news show that grows into a preaching to the choir tone within its first act. It is a long tiring process that Michael Mann, the co-writers and director, wants you to be a part of, why? Also, I couldn't imagine a film confined in its doomed script to ever come off winning, this wannabe Lawrence Of Arabia lacks the romance between the audience and the character that David Lean made sure his film was fueled of. On the positive side, the hard work is transparent as water and pays off more than enough when it comes to create these behemoth action set pieces on such a large scale. Michael's passion and Daniel Day-Lewis's skin in the game makes all the effort worth. No matter how many times you find yourself watching the clock, you'd also want to see Daniel pouring his soul in on the magnanimous and generously fierce character. Madeleine Stowe and Russell Means is supporting Daniel and the film thoroughly to reach to a better end. The script mainly works on the duality of the war and not the characters, and after its first act, the film gets pretty simple and unbearingly hard to watch. There is a lot of political correctness in the film, which unfortunately is turned up a notch that often undermines the emotions these characters go through and its major asset, the one dramatic scene that it all hinges upon is the major victim of this disease. The Last Of The Mohicans feels more like an Oscar bait than a deep dive on a rich Americana culture.

    Cover. Ambush. The Last Of The Mohicans Mann's ruffian ideology is undoubtedly tough and on the other hand is incredibly brittle. This political thriller that was aspired to be thought provoking feels like you tuned in a prime time news show that grows into a preaching to the choir tone within its first act. It is a long tiring process that Michael Mann, the co-writers and director, wants you to be a part of, why? Also, I couldn't imagine a film confined in its doomed script to ever come off winning, this wannabe Lawrence Of Arabia lacks the romance between the audience and the character that David Lean made sure his film was fueled of. On the positive side, the hard work is transparent as water and pays off more than enough when it comes to create these behemoth action set pieces on such a large scale. Michael's passion and Daniel Day-Lewis's skin in the game makes all the effort worth. No matter how many times you find yourself watching the clock, you'd also want to see Daniel pouring his soul in on the magnanimous and generously fierce character. Madeleine Stowe and Russell Means is supporting Daniel and the film thoroughly to reach to a better end. The script mainly works on the duality of the war and not the characters, and after its first act, the film gets pretty simple and unbearingly hard to watch. There is a lot of political correctness in the film, which unfortunately is turned up a notch that often undermines the emotions these characters go through and its major asset, the one dramatic scene that it all hinges upon is the major victim of this disease. The Last Of The Mohicans feels more like an Oscar bait than a deep dive on a rich Americana culture.

  • Mar 31, 2019

    Easily one of the best historical epics of the 90's and imo better than Unforgiven was. Sadly cheated at some Oscars, it's one of the best filmed historical epics I can think of. Also one of Lewis's best roles (tied with Bill the Butcher as his best in my eyes anyways,) this was the movie that made DDL a box office name. It also features Madeline Stowe at her best and imo a cheated Oscar winning performance from Wes Studi as Magua, one of the more human and relateable villain/native american performances of the last 3 decades. Michael Mann was at fine form here with both his crafting and storytelling.

    Easily one of the best historical epics of the 90's and imo better than Unforgiven was. Sadly cheated at some Oscars, it's one of the best filmed historical epics I can think of. Also one of Lewis's best roles (tied with Bill the Butcher as his best in my eyes anyways,) this was the movie that made DDL a box office name. It also features Madeline Stowe at her best and imo a cheated Oscar winning performance from Wes Studi as Magua, one of the more human and relateable villain/native american performances of the last 3 decades. Michael Mann was at fine form here with both his crafting and storytelling.

  • Feb 01, 2019

    The best thrilling epic romance movie ever made! With the best movie character ever portrayed: Daniel Day-Lewis as Nathaniel "Hawkeye" Poe!

    The best thrilling epic romance movie ever made! With the best movie character ever portrayed: Daniel Day-Lewis as Nathaniel "Hawkeye" Poe!