Unforgiven Reviews

  • Jan 11, 2020

    Masterpiece, the best Western ever made.

    Masterpiece, the best Western ever made.

  • Dec 28, 2019

    "It's a hell of a thing killin' a man. You take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."

    "It's a hell of a thing killin' a man. You take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."

  • Dec 15, 2019

    otimo faroeste psicologico

    otimo faroeste psicologico

  • Dec 08, 2019

    Unforgiven is a good closed for a long cowlboy career from Mr Eastwood.

    Unforgiven is a good closed for a long cowlboy career from Mr Eastwood.

  • Nov 23, 2019

    A nearly perfect movie... and the more I think of it... a Christian one. Reformed killer is tempted back to his old ways to support his family but can he do it filled with repentance and shame?

    A nearly perfect movie... and the more I think of it... a Christian one. Reformed killer is tempted back to his old ways to support his family but can he do it filled with repentance and shame?

  • Oct 03, 2019

    A culmination of all the Eastwood westerns in 1 film.

    A culmination of all the Eastwood westerns in 1 film.

  • Aug 14, 2019

    A thoughtful deconstruction of the Western genre from one of its icons. Director Clint Eastwood's Western deconstruction drama Unforgiven (1992) is a pensive take on weary characters. Eastwood finds the heart and motivations for his characters as contextualized by the Western genre. Westerns often lead to mythic heroes that gun down foes with reckless abandon and no remorse, meanwhile Unforgiven hardly fires any shots but rather reflects on why these people should ever draw a gun in the first place. It is a fairly progressive film from the notoriously conservative Eastwood. Eastwood's direction finds intriguing characters in his dark and moody Western. I found the lighting too dark for most of the film, but when faces are illuminated, you are struck by how beautiful the camera work is in Unforgiven. Eastwood's direction keeps you engaged with the acting and focuses in on the little character interactions instead of a sweeping story. Jack Green's cinematography has many stunning far wide shots of landscapes and towns, but the best shots are of eyes before a shootout or hands before a gun is drawn. I liked the shot of Eastwood in the dark bar while sick or when he thinks he's dying in the barn. These frames capture the sadness and age of Eastwood's retired gunslinger character. Clint Eastwood's acting is solid and compelling. He is a likable enough hero as he seems genuinely remorseful for killing so many. I do wish we saw more of his character's earlier kills as much of the script is exposition to establish how much of a deadly killer William Munny was once. Showing more instead of telling might have helped the slower pace of little action. Eastwood commands your attention when he talks, but the quiet moments in Unforgiven get a bit dull. Gene Hackman absolutely steals the show as the tough Sheriff Little Bill Daggett. His fearsome presence and cruel actions make Hackman unforgettable in Unforgiven. If Eastwood's character cannot forgive crimes others have committed just like he cannot forgive himself, Hackman's character is just as liable for his violent responses to people breaking the law. You immediately hate Hackman's Little Bill for not bringing real justice to the men that cut up a woman. His beating of the elderly Richard Harris as the hilarious and intimidating English Bob is just the icing on the cake of cruelty that establishes his character as a harrowing bully. Hackman embodies the mythic Western villain that is attributed to Eastwood's character. Morgan Freeman is solid as the heartfelt Ned Logan. His interactions with Eastwood are compelling, but reveals a larger problem with Unforgiven. This film is so intent on critiquing the exaggerated exploits of Western heroes that it fumbles its dialogue often. I found much of what is said by characters to lack any nuance. It's all so on the nose. I genuinely did not like Jaimz Woolvett as The Schofield Kid. His incessant commentary and constant complaints are so annoying. Clint Eastwood should have just lead the film somehow without this awful character. Woolvett comes across as too eager and just a representation of Unforgiven's theme of characters that are not all that they say they are in reputation. Lennie Neihaus' score is pretty and understated, but perhaps too ambient for such a sparse film. If the Unforgiven had a resounding theme or some exciting dramatic music underneath instead of pretty atmospheric music, the film might have had pacing on that level alone. Overall, Unforgiven is only for fans of the Western genre that want to see a new take on a talented gunfighter shooting through villains. I highly recommend Unforgiven for Clint Eastwood and Gene Hackman's acting performances, though others are not as impressive in their roles. Unforgiven is not Eastwood's greatest Western as his work in Sergio Leone's films is superior, but his own direction feels weighted with decades of experience in the world of Westerns.

    A thoughtful deconstruction of the Western genre from one of its icons. Director Clint Eastwood's Western deconstruction drama Unforgiven (1992) is a pensive take on weary characters. Eastwood finds the heart and motivations for his characters as contextualized by the Western genre. Westerns often lead to mythic heroes that gun down foes with reckless abandon and no remorse, meanwhile Unforgiven hardly fires any shots but rather reflects on why these people should ever draw a gun in the first place. It is a fairly progressive film from the notoriously conservative Eastwood. Eastwood's direction finds intriguing characters in his dark and moody Western. I found the lighting too dark for most of the film, but when faces are illuminated, you are struck by how beautiful the camera work is in Unforgiven. Eastwood's direction keeps you engaged with the acting and focuses in on the little character interactions instead of a sweeping story. Jack Green's cinematography has many stunning far wide shots of landscapes and towns, but the best shots are of eyes before a shootout or hands before a gun is drawn. I liked the shot of Eastwood in the dark bar while sick or when he thinks he's dying in the barn. These frames capture the sadness and age of Eastwood's retired gunslinger character. Clint Eastwood's acting is solid and compelling. He is a likable enough hero as he seems genuinely remorseful for killing so many. I do wish we saw more of his character's earlier kills as much of the script is exposition to establish how much of a deadly killer William Munny was once. Showing more instead of telling might have helped the slower pace of little action. Eastwood commands your attention when he talks, but the quiet moments in Unforgiven get a bit dull. Gene Hackman absolutely steals the show as the tough Sheriff Little Bill Daggett. His fearsome presence and cruel actions make Hackman unforgettable in Unforgiven. If Eastwood's character cannot forgive crimes others have committed just like he cannot forgive himself, Hackman's character is just as liable for his violent responses to people breaking the law. You immediately hate Hackman's Little Bill for not bringing real justice to the men that cut up a woman. His beating of the elderly Richard Harris as the hilarious and intimidating English Bob is just the icing on the cake of cruelty that establishes his character as a harrowing bully. Hackman embodies the mythic Western villain that is attributed to Eastwood's character. Morgan Freeman is solid as the heartfelt Ned Logan. His interactions with Eastwood are compelling, but reveals a larger problem with Unforgiven. This film is so intent on critiquing the exaggerated exploits of Western heroes that it fumbles its dialogue often. I found much of what is said by characters to lack any nuance. It's all so on the nose. I genuinely did not like Jaimz Woolvett as The Schofield Kid. His incessant commentary and constant complaints are so annoying. Clint Eastwood should have just lead the film somehow without this awful character. Woolvett comes across as too eager and just a representation of Unforgiven's theme of characters that are not all that they say they are in reputation. Lennie Neihaus' score is pretty and understated, but perhaps too ambient for such a sparse film. If the Unforgiven had a resounding theme or some exciting dramatic music underneath instead of pretty atmospheric music, the film might have had pacing on that level alone. Overall, Unforgiven is only for fans of the Western genre that want to see a new take on a talented gunfighter shooting through villains. I highly recommend Unforgiven for Clint Eastwood and Gene Hackman's acting performances, though others are not as impressive in their roles. Unforgiven is not Eastwood's greatest Western as his work in Sergio Leone's films is superior, but his own direction feels weighted with decades of experience in the world of Westerns.

  • Aug 08, 2019

    Predictable and boring. One of Clint Eastwood's worst films in my opinion.

    Predictable and boring. One of Clint Eastwood's worst films in my opinion.

  • Jul 28, 2019

    It's a GOOD movie.

    It's a GOOD movie.

  • Jul 25, 2019

    a true classic never get tired of watching it

    a true classic never get tired of watching it