Three Colors: Red (Trois couleurs: Rouge) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Three Colors: Red (Trois couleurs: Rouge) Reviews

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½ July 6, 2017
I wish all trilogies were like the 'three colors' trilogy. This conclusive film to the trilogy is another complex and disturbing view at human psychology. To observe the relations between the young model and the old judge is a fascinating experience done and executed in a truly graceful manner, the scenery being richly filled with the red color.
But I still think that the 'blue color' is a more emotional film with more striking scenes and resolutions.
½ March 27, 2017
For some reason I have yet to see the other two films in the "Three Colors" trilogy, but I have seen this one 3 times now. Irene Jacob stars as a model that meets retired judge Jean-Louis Trintignant when she runs over his dog. She discovers that he has spent years eavesdropping on his neighbors phone conversations. He initially rebuffs her, but something about her penetrates his hard exterior, and he opens up to her. There is a connection between them ... the mistakes of his past seem to be mirrored in her present. Perhaps he can fix this. Kieslowski's films seem to come from a deep and mysterious place.
February 7, 2017
Red is for Fraternity. This film follows the story of Valentine (Jacob), a young model, and a jaded, worldly, retired judge (Trintignant) whom Valentine meets by chance after she accidently hits his dog with her car.

This film is about the interconnectedness of things, despite us being oblivious to these connections most of the time.

Like Blue, the third film in this trilogy is IMO a masterpiece. This trilogy should be seen by everyone at least once.
February 2, 2017
Perhaps the most philosophically dense film ever made. Most of Kieslowski's films seem like puzzles to me, meant to expand mind and soul.
½ January 21, 2017
Aestethically beautiful, emotionally engaging, and thought-provoking. Red is the perfect culmination to the Kieslowski's ambitious trilogy, and it's a masterpiece on its own right.
January 12, 2017
Kieslowski and his muse Irene Jacob made some of the most beautiful, thought-provoking art in the 1990s. This one deals with voyeurism, guilt, love, and of course, fate.
January 9, 2017
The way several people's lives all run parallel and intersect at one point or another is incredibly realistic and believable thanks to outstanding performances. The film is truly touching and extremely emotional, the trilogy as a whole is something really special.
Super Reviewer
½ December 24, 2016
The last and most remarkable film in Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy is this warm and beautiful depiction of solidarity and fraternity (symbolized by the color red in the French flag), with excellent performances and bringing the trilogy to a wonderful, haunting conclusion.
November 9, 2016
A strong end to the trilogy. Wonderful.
November 1, 2016
Like the previous two films in the Three Colors trilogy, Red is engrossing and unpredictable. The three stories are only loosely connected at the seams, but with this film, I think I understand the thematic connection between the three films--life is random and strangers can cross paths in ironic ways without realizing it. Each film is tremendous on its own, but as a trilogy, they are better than the sums of their parts.
September 8, 2016
As the enchanting final chapter to the extraordinary Three Colors trilogy, Red is a beautiful, magnificent, complex film about life, coincidence, and connection.
August 16, 2016
A true masterpiece on a forgotten concept after fall of Berlin Wall: "Fraternity".
April 28, 2016
Masterfully directed this wonderful film is a must for fans of auteur cinema from Kieslowski, a unique genius who left much too soon. This is a gorgeously shot film, the story is very different and unique by it's tone and characters so well written and acted by some amazing performers.
Thi is a must see.
December 18, 2015
A magnificent conclusion to the Three Colors trilogy. Definitely the best of the three.
December 13, 2015
The best and last of the three colours trilogy. This one does have some nice quirks to it and a scene that brings the three films together which is rather unexpected. Good story and very nicely made.
November 19, 2015
The concept of interconnected lives throughout the trilogy is an intriguing one, but this one didn't live up to the one that precedes it. It's a great wrap up for the group of films, and the ending was an interesting revelation than made you think about them in a different light.
½ September 30, 2015
Although the end fell a little flat for me, Red is still a stunning film that examines the most complex ideas of the trilogy. The scenes between Jacob and Trintignant ask the basic questions of what is right and how are we connected, both examining the brotherhood of man (personhood of humans?) at it's core. They each come away from their unexpected friendship for the better, redeemed if you will.
August 7, 2015
This is one of my favorite movies. It is very well crafted and has a very interesting story and general idea. Its also well played and executed. Is full of art elements which its impossible to not notice. And sepecial effects like beautiful zoom-ins and zoom-outs. Even after 20 years it still stays interesting and one of the best for audience.
Irene Jacob is playing a beautiful soul so that she keeps you on your chair for the entire movie. The story and the way it was told is very interesting and engaging.
August 1, 2015
Krzysztof Kieslowski's final entry in his renowned Three Colors trilogy is a film so astounding that he, then in his early 50s, retired after completing it. Perhaps he knew he'd never equal it. Kieslowski's color-coded trilogy worked through the colors of the French flag (if he'd picked South Africa, he'd still be making it), rooting each film in France's national motto liberté, égalité, fraternité, and stuffing them chock full of universal themes. And all the tantalizing hints of a connection between the films led to this. Three Colors: Red takes its tale of a model's curious friendship with a retired-judge-turned voyeur, interlocking lives and loves, the nature of chance and the unlikelihood of happiness and masks it in a hypnotically ravishing aura of aching melancholy, silky-smooth camerawork, enrapturing characterization and lots and lots of red cinematography. It's a staggeringly beautiful, eloquent, preternatural, out-of-body experience that, if you revel in the challenge of mastering a film's dynamic traits and metaphors, peeling back the layers before finding the film's true nature, you will fall head over heels for.
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