Reviews

  • Jul 04, 2021

    Like all of the films in this trilogy "Three Colors: Red" uses color in a unique and visually pleasing way. I think this movie's story is interesting and the characters are enjoyable to watch. Personally, I think "Blue" is the best movie from the series but I enjoyed this one more than "White." As a whole, this is a very artsy series that only film enthusiasts should watch as they have some interesting themes to analyze and connect as a trilogy in very subtle ways. Overall, I thought this was a good concluding chapter that demanded more of my attention than the other two movies and presenting more fascinating visual tricks with its color scheme.

    Like all of the films in this trilogy "Three Colors: Red" uses color in a unique and visually pleasing way. I think this movie's story is interesting and the characters are enjoyable to watch. Personally, I think "Blue" is the best movie from the series but I enjoyed this one more than "White." As a whole, this is a very artsy series that only film enthusiasts should watch as they have some interesting themes to analyze and connect as a trilogy in very subtle ways. Overall, I thought this was a good concluding chapter that demanded more of my attention than the other two movies and presenting more fascinating visual tricks with its color scheme.

  • May 19, 2021

    It's a story of coincidence and symbolism. She's a part time model. He's a retired judge much her senior. She runs over his dog...and then finds him spying on other's relationships.

    It's a story of coincidence and symbolism. She's a part time model. He's a retired judge much her senior. She runs over his dog...and then finds him spying on other's relationships.

  • Feb 15, 2021

    A somewhat whimsical story told with beautiful cinematography. A must-see if you're into arthouse movies.

    A somewhat whimsical story told with beautiful cinematography. A must-see if you're into arthouse movies.

  • Jan 09, 2021

    Fantastic film to cap off one of the best trilogies I've seen. These are the sorts of characters that you wish you had more time with, but maybe it's for the best that we only get a brief snapshot, for not to ruin the experience.

    Fantastic film to cap off one of the best trilogies I've seen. These are the sorts of characters that you wish you had more time with, but maybe it's for the best that we only get a brief snapshot, for not to ruin the experience.

  • Dec 14, 2020

    Let's not ignore the truly tortured protgonist of this film series - that woman struggling to get her wine bottles into the recycling bin. With a narrative that combines the satisfactory conclusion of an Ocean's Eleven-esque reveal and an emotionally resonant and philosophical base with cinematography orchestrated to match the sophistication and harmony of a Swiss watch, Three Colors: Red is functional on both a surface level and as a piece of serious filmmaking. The Marvel Cinematic Universe of arthouse cinema concludes with that same energy of, "Hey, it's all connected. You're that woman from that other thing!" without feeling as if it were supposedly pandering or forced, though you do have to wonder with the edning of White how Karol and Dominique end up on the same vessel crossing the Channel. The carefully constructed perspective of the camera and the relative positions between characters brings to mind the work of Yasujiro Ozu and his innovative takes on angle and perspective, here realized in the depiction of character, particularly in the relationship between Jacob's Valentine and Trintignant's Kern. The color and imagery are each carefully controlled to add to the narrative. As compelling a film as has been made in the past half century. (5/5)

    Let's not ignore the truly tortured protgonist of this film series - that woman struggling to get her wine bottles into the recycling bin. With a narrative that combines the satisfactory conclusion of an Ocean's Eleven-esque reveal and an emotionally resonant and philosophical base with cinematography orchestrated to match the sophistication and harmony of a Swiss watch, Three Colors: Red is functional on both a surface level and as a piece of serious filmmaking. The Marvel Cinematic Universe of arthouse cinema concludes with that same energy of, "Hey, it's all connected. You're that woman from that other thing!" without feeling as if it were supposedly pandering or forced, though you do have to wonder with the edning of White how Karol and Dominique end up on the same vessel crossing the Channel. The carefully constructed perspective of the camera and the relative positions between characters brings to mind the work of Yasujiro Ozu and his innovative takes on angle and perspective, here realized in the depiction of character, particularly in the relationship between Jacob's Valentine and Trintignant's Kern. The color and imagery are each carefully controlled to add to the narrative. As compelling a film as has been made in the past half century. (5/5)

  • Aug 29, 2020

    Red is such a good movie but wouldn't call it the best one of the Three Colours Trilogy, I think "Blue" is the best one. The movie started so well but as we were moving towards, I started to feel that it was starting to get weak, I was really disappointed especially that I read some of the reviews and the fact that it was nominated for 3 Oscars. The directing was absolutely amazing, can't argue by that, the color red was so pure and beautiful in the movie, but I just didn't like the story or a better way to say it, I didn't feel the story or the relationship between the judge and Valentina. The music was a thing that I didn't notice at all in this movie, felt like it wasn't even there, not like the first or second one, the music was so powerful in these two but I don't know what happened in that one. The production design was pretty cool especially Valentina's apartment, also The Judge's. Great movie but wouldn't call it the best one of the trilogy like everyone did, for me Blue is the best one, but great t job and a great end to a great trilogy.

    Red is such a good movie but wouldn't call it the best one of the Three Colours Trilogy, I think "Blue" is the best one. The movie started so well but as we were moving towards, I started to feel that it was starting to get weak, I was really disappointed especially that I read some of the reviews and the fact that it was nominated for 3 Oscars. The directing was absolutely amazing, can't argue by that, the color red was so pure and beautiful in the movie, but I just didn't like the story or a better way to say it, I didn't feel the story or the relationship between the judge and Valentina. The music was a thing that I didn't notice at all in this movie, felt like it wasn't even there, not like the first or second one, the music was so powerful in these two but I don't know what happened in that one. The production design was pretty cool especially Valentina's apartment, also The Judge's. Great movie but wouldn't call it the best one of the trilogy like everyone did, for me Blue is the best one, but great t job and a great end to a great trilogy.

  • Jul 30, 2020

    A movie that kept me thinking but also confused me, there are themes and symbolism all over the movie but I am failing to understand some of them. They feel like they don't belong. All of reviews and analysis I have encountered have fail to explain in a wholesome way what is that the movie was trying to achieve.

    A movie that kept me thinking but also confused me, there are themes and symbolism all over the movie but I am failing to understand some of them. They feel like they don't belong. All of reviews and analysis I have encountered have fail to explain in a wholesome way what is that the movie was trying to achieve.

  • Jun 07, 2020

    A little slow but well crafted. Irene Jacob is wowzers in this film, classic french beauty. Reasonable ending helps tie the film together. Not quite involving enough for me to give a higher rating.

    A little slow but well crafted. Irene Jacob is wowzers in this film, classic french beauty. Reasonable ending helps tie the film together. Not quite involving enough for me to give a higher rating.

  • Aug 09, 2019

    Spooky yet powerful. You are guaranteed a fair results at the end not like the other 2 movies.

    Spooky yet powerful. You are guaranteed a fair results at the end not like the other 2 movies.

  • May 06, 2019

    This was the best film in the Three Colors trilogy, it managed to incorporate the serious melodrama of Blue and the delicate balance of humor and darkness in White to produce a romantic film in which the two leads do not interact until the final moments of the film. Mysticism and the idea that two people were â~meant' to meet was a theme in all three films but here this idea is delved into the most and we even get a figure who resembles a Delphic Oracle. I had only seen Irene Jacob in U.S. Marshals (1998) and I was not aware of her abilities as a dramatic actress but here the entire cast is magnificent as weird, delightful people who don't feel as though they would usually be characters in a romantic film but combine to form an interesting study of relationships and the nature of intimacy. Valentine, Irene Jacob, works as a model, is a ballet student and appears to be pursuing higher education but her life seems empty as she is only seen contacting her boyfriend, Michel, over the phone. One day she hits a dog and discovers that the dog's owner, Joseph, Jean-Louis Trintignant, spies on his neighbors by listening to their private telephone conversations. Although Valentine is initially morally outraged she adjusts her outlook on life as he teaches her about his personal moral philosophy. Concurrently we see a young judge Auguste, Jean-Pierre Lorit, whose experiences echo those of Joseph as a young man. It is understood that there is a connection between the two young, slightly lost people and Kern's belief that she will end up happy with a man appears to be true as the two finally meet at the end of the film. My mother's initial problem with the film was that Valentine was not very clearly defined as a character and that the fact that she was a model and a ballet student made her appear both shallow and as though she was a male fantasy. I believe that she was developed as a character as I believe we see that there is something missing from her life at the beginning of the film and although she tries to fill that hole with many things only love will be able to make her truly happy. Her modeling is also an important element of her character because we see that she does not just put on costumes and pretend in her job but in her personal life. She is a compelling lead and her strength is not shown through loud, screechy monologues or her physically abusing a man but through her forthrightness in her interactions with those around her. The romantic elements of the film are handled with care as Kieslowski is careful to never let the film slip into being sappy or sentimental because that's simply not his style. Joseph's philosophy is harsh and often confrontational but it is clear that his conviction that Valentine will find lasting love. Pain and heartbreak are not seen as something to be erased from the human experience, they are seen as essential elements of finding love. Without heartbreak how can we properly relish the feeling of being in love, the difficulty of continuing a relationship despite impediments and the importance of getting back up again after having been knocked down. The uniting of our two lovelorn leads is such an ecstatic moment because these two have faced immense pains in their love lives leading up to this moment and we, the audience, are so desperate to see them find the person who won't break their heart or neglect them. The film can be watched and understood by anybody, even myself who has never been in a romantic relationship, because we have all witnessed love and heartbreak. They are universal emotions and Kieslowski brings them to life in a film that feels oddly like the mix of a fairytale and the preamble to a Werner Herzog documentary. Loving this film has caused me to be labeled a â~ pretentious hipster' by my friends but I really don't care because this is a great film that deserves to be loved by more than just film critics and cineastes.

    This was the best film in the Three Colors trilogy, it managed to incorporate the serious melodrama of Blue and the delicate balance of humor and darkness in White to produce a romantic film in which the two leads do not interact until the final moments of the film. Mysticism and the idea that two people were â~meant' to meet was a theme in all three films but here this idea is delved into the most and we even get a figure who resembles a Delphic Oracle. I had only seen Irene Jacob in U.S. Marshals (1998) and I was not aware of her abilities as a dramatic actress but here the entire cast is magnificent as weird, delightful people who don't feel as though they would usually be characters in a romantic film but combine to form an interesting study of relationships and the nature of intimacy. Valentine, Irene Jacob, works as a model, is a ballet student and appears to be pursuing higher education but her life seems empty as she is only seen contacting her boyfriend, Michel, over the phone. One day she hits a dog and discovers that the dog's owner, Joseph, Jean-Louis Trintignant, spies on his neighbors by listening to their private telephone conversations. Although Valentine is initially morally outraged she adjusts her outlook on life as he teaches her about his personal moral philosophy. Concurrently we see a young judge Auguste, Jean-Pierre Lorit, whose experiences echo those of Joseph as a young man. It is understood that there is a connection between the two young, slightly lost people and Kern's belief that she will end up happy with a man appears to be true as the two finally meet at the end of the film. My mother's initial problem with the film was that Valentine was not very clearly defined as a character and that the fact that she was a model and a ballet student made her appear both shallow and as though she was a male fantasy. I believe that she was developed as a character as I believe we see that there is something missing from her life at the beginning of the film and although she tries to fill that hole with many things only love will be able to make her truly happy. Her modeling is also an important element of her character because we see that she does not just put on costumes and pretend in her job but in her personal life. She is a compelling lead and her strength is not shown through loud, screechy monologues or her physically abusing a man but through her forthrightness in her interactions with those around her. The romantic elements of the film are handled with care as Kieslowski is careful to never let the film slip into being sappy or sentimental because that's simply not his style. Joseph's philosophy is harsh and often confrontational but it is clear that his conviction that Valentine will find lasting love. Pain and heartbreak are not seen as something to be erased from the human experience, they are seen as essential elements of finding love. Without heartbreak how can we properly relish the feeling of being in love, the difficulty of continuing a relationship despite impediments and the importance of getting back up again after having been knocked down. The uniting of our two lovelorn leads is such an ecstatic moment because these two have faced immense pains in their love lives leading up to this moment and we, the audience, are so desperate to see them find the person who won't break their heart or neglect them. The film can be watched and understood by anybody, even myself who has never been in a romantic relationship, because we have all witnessed love and heartbreak. They are universal emotions and Kieslowski brings them to life in a film that feels oddly like the mix of a fairytale and the preamble to a Werner Herzog documentary. Loving this film has caused me to be labeled a â~ pretentious hipster' by my friends but I really don't care because this is a great film that deserves to be loved by more than just film critics and cineastes.