Heat Reviews

  • Aug 09, 2019

    The most important thing this film gets right (for me) is the audio. The (almost) authetic sounding gunfights is a rare delight.

    The most important thing this film gets right (for me) is the audio. The (almost) authetic sounding gunfights is a rare delight.

  • Jul 31, 2019

    Great film! In awe with the scenes and the cat and mouse element between two great actors de niro and pacino!Gripping and great dialogues.Very tense film.Must watch!

    Great film! In awe with the scenes and the cat and mouse element between two great actors de niro and pacino!Gripping and great dialogues.Very tense film.Must watch!

  • Jul 16, 2019

    This movie has everything.

    This movie has everything.

  • Jul 15, 2019

    So people's first criticism of "Heat" will be that it's maybe too long and meandering, which is true to an extent. I still think that the high points of this movie make up for any of its slower parts big time, along with some killer performances. Pacino admitted that his character is supposed to be on coke the whole movie, and De Niro's character is a former Marine if you watch closely. These little nuances make "Heat" awesome. The bank robbery scene is legendary, and was even used by the USMC to teach recruits about combat tactics. I'm a former infantry Marine, so of course I think that's badass. This movie is a must-see if you like action/mob/crime movies.

    So people's first criticism of "Heat" will be that it's maybe too long and meandering, which is true to an extent. I still think that the high points of this movie make up for any of its slower parts big time, along with some killer performances. Pacino admitted that his character is supposed to be on coke the whole movie, and De Niro's character is a former Marine if you watch closely. These little nuances make "Heat" awesome. The bank robbery scene is legendary, and was even used by the USMC to teach recruits about combat tactics. I'm a former infantry Marine, so of course I think that's badass. This movie is a must-see if you like action/mob/crime movies.

  • Jul 14, 2019

    Some of the best shoot out scenes you will see in a movie. The cat and mouse game between Pacino and De Niro is awesome. It starts out fast and ends with a bang.

    Some of the best shoot out scenes you will see in a movie. The cat and mouse game between Pacino and De Niro is awesome. It starts out fast and ends with a bang.

  • Jul 12, 2019

    The greatest shootout ever.

    The greatest shootout ever.

  • Jun 25, 2019

    Director Michael Mann keeps the audience at attention with gunfights suspense and great acting

    Director Michael Mann keeps the audience at attention with gunfights suspense and great acting

  • Jun 02, 2019

    Literally ome of my favorite crime dramas of all time.

    Literally ome of my favorite crime dramas of all time.

  • May 28, 2019

    The best heist film ever made. Michael Mann's crime drama Heat (1995) is a blistering heist film filled with thoughtful character introductions and development, a shocking robbery, a tense heist, a exciting shootout, and a gripping finale. Heat has been endlessly ripped off, but never surpassed or matched. Heat has clearly inspired probably every crime film after it as its effect is constantly felt. From the deep character study of its complex criminal and police characters to its brutal shootout and intricate heist. Heat is an all time great whose impact continues to be felt today. Heat is Michael Mann taking everything he learned as a director from Thief and Manhunter and elevating into this masterpiece of criminal masterminds and police ingenuity. Mann slowly makes you care about each character on both sides of the law, then takes them away from you one by one. the truck robbery is so shocking and cool that you are immediately engrossed by Heat's ambitious criminality and masterful direction. Mann keeps you right with the gang during the shootout in a hail of bullets like no other. I do not know what exactly is so perfect about the bank shootout, but it works on every level. The sudden tragedy, the human casualties, the loud gunfire, the endless stream of machine gun fire, or the constant chase aspect all culminate in an exhilarating and frightening shootout like I have never seen topped in any other film. Mann tops himself within Heat with his airport finale with a gripping chase that leads into a film noir shootout under the night sky. Heat is simply immaculately directed by Michael Mann. Robert De Niro is awesome as Neil, a criminal mastermind, who think of everything beforehand with devastating results. Together with a hyper focused Al Pacino as police homicide detective Vincent, they capture Heat's justice dynamic with a sympathetic viewpoint into each side of the law. They are both cool and hilarious at several points in Heat, especially their coffee chat in a restaurant and the airport finale. They represent a hero hellbent on ending a crime spree while struggling to maintain his marriage in Pacino's Vincent and a villain gouging out the heart of morality while trying to find genuine love in De Niro's Neil. De Niro desperately wants out and a new life with Amy Brenneman's kindly, yet naive Eade, while Pacino's Vincent wants a fresh start with his wife Justine, played by the fierce and direct Diane Venora. The duality of Pacino and De Niro's roles is fascinating unto itself in Heat. Heat is some of De Niro and Pacino's finest character acting. Val Kilmer is a rush of energy as he guns down men from afar with unbelievable results. Kilmer's carnage in Heat is just unreal and has to be seen to be believed. Kilmer's Chris even gets a sympathetic side as his marriage has fallen apart like Pacino's character Vincent's own predicament. Alongside the lovely Ashley Judd as the fed up Charlene, Val Kilmer gives a strong heart to an adrenaline rush of a villain. Likewise, Tom Sizemore's blackhearted Michael is a likable family man and another professional seeking a thrilling heist to sate his criminal urges even at the cost of the innocent. Similarly, Kevin Gage is unforgettable as the repulsive monster Waingro. You will feel unsettled at the very least by Waingro's presence. Jon Voight is solid and intriguing as Neil's mysterious contact Nate. Natalie Portman is devastating and adorable in Heat as Pacino's step-daughter Lauren. Wes Studi has a supporting role as one of Pacino's steadfast cops Casals like Ted Levine's Bosko. I really liked Tom Noonan's short cameo as Kelson. Dennis Haysbert, Hank Azaria, William Fichtner, Henry Rollins, Susan Traylor, and Danny Trejo all have neat smaller roles too in Heat. Overall, Heat's cast is outstanding and fun. Elliot Goldenthal's score is a dreamy musical accompaniment to the dark L.A. nighttime backdrop. Heat is full of dimly lit rooms and carefully silhouetted figures. Goldenthal's premier moment is in the finale as he scores a beautiful piece while Pacino looks distant in the airport's fields against the bleak sky. Dante Spinotti's cinematography beautiful represents L.A. nightlife with piercing imagery and mesmerizing shots. Every shot of a face or gun feels deliberate and worthwhile. Heat is just a masterful display of filmmaking all around. In all, Heat is a must see film for Michael Mann's ambitious and epic direction with a ton of immaculate cogs in the corrupt clockwork of Heat.

    The best heist film ever made. Michael Mann's crime drama Heat (1995) is a blistering heist film filled with thoughtful character introductions and development, a shocking robbery, a tense heist, a exciting shootout, and a gripping finale. Heat has been endlessly ripped off, but never surpassed or matched. Heat has clearly inspired probably every crime film after it as its effect is constantly felt. From the deep character study of its complex criminal and police characters to its brutal shootout and intricate heist. Heat is an all time great whose impact continues to be felt today. Heat is Michael Mann taking everything he learned as a director from Thief and Manhunter and elevating into this masterpiece of criminal masterminds and police ingenuity. Mann slowly makes you care about each character on both sides of the law, then takes them away from you one by one. the truck robbery is so shocking and cool that you are immediately engrossed by Heat's ambitious criminality and masterful direction. Mann keeps you right with the gang during the shootout in a hail of bullets like no other. I do not know what exactly is so perfect about the bank shootout, but it works on every level. The sudden tragedy, the human casualties, the loud gunfire, the endless stream of machine gun fire, or the constant chase aspect all culminate in an exhilarating and frightening shootout like I have never seen topped in any other film. Mann tops himself within Heat with his airport finale with a gripping chase that leads into a film noir shootout under the night sky. Heat is simply immaculately directed by Michael Mann. Robert De Niro is awesome as Neil, a criminal mastermind, who think of everything beforehand with devastating results. Together with a hyper focused Al Pacino as police homicide detective Vincent, they capture Heat's justice dynamic with a sympathetic viewpoint into each side of the law. They are both cool and hilarious at several points in Heat, especially their coffee chat in a restaurant and the airport finale. They represent a hero hellbent on ending a crime spree while struggling to maintain his marriage in Pacino's Vincent and a villain gouging out the heart of morality while trying to find genuine love in De Niro's Neil. De Niro desperately wants out and a new life with Amy Brenneman's kindly, yet naive Eade, while Pacino's Vincent wants a fresh start with his wife Justine, played by the fierce and direct Diane Venora. The duality of Pacino and De Niro's roles is fascinating unto itself in Heat. Heat is some of De Niro and Pacino's finest character acting. Val Kilmer is a rush of energy as he guns down men from afar with unbelievable results. Kilmer's carnage in Heat is just unreal and has to be seen to be believed. Kilmer's Chris even gets a sympathetic side as his marriage has fallen apart like Pacino's character Vincent's own predicament. Alongside the lovely Ashley Judd as the fed up Charlene, Val Kilmer gives a strong heart to an adrenaline rush of a villain. Likewise, Tom Sizemore's blackhearted Michael is a likable family man and another professional seeking a thrilling heist to sate his criminal urges even at the cost of the innocent. Similarly, Kevin Gage is unforgettable as the repulsive monster Waingro. You will feel unsettled at the very least by Waingro's presence. Jon Voight is solid and intriguing as Neil's mysterious contact Nate. Natalie Portman is devastating and adorable in Heat as Pacino's step-daughter Lauren. Wes Studi has a supporting role as one of Pacino's steadfast cops Casals like Ted Levine's Bosko. I really liked Tom Noonan's short cameo as Kelson. Dennis Haysbert, Hank Azaria, William Fichtner, Henry Rollins, Susan Traylor, and Danny Trejo all have neat smaller roles too in Heat. Overall, Heat's cast is outstanding and fun. Elliot Goldenthal's score is a dreamy musical accompaniment to the dark L.A. nighttime backdrop. Heat is full of dimly lit rooms and carefully silhouetted figures. Goldenthal's premier moment is in the finale as he scores a beautiful piece while Pacino looks distant in the airport's fields against the bleak sky. Dante Spinotti's cinematography beautiful represents L.A. nightlife with piercing imagery and mesmerizing shots. Every shot of a face or gun feels deliberate and worthwhile. Heat is just a masterful display of filmmaking all around. In all, Heat is a must see film for Michael Mann's ambitious and epic direction with a ton of immaculate cogs in the corrupt clockwork of Heat.

  • May 21, 2019

    The pinnacle of quality film making.

    The pinnacle of quality film making.