Boys - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Boys Reviews

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January 14, 2011
The actors do a nice job of investing it all with a certain conviction, and there's a fairy-tale tinge to some of the action that gives it a certain charm.
February 9, 2006
Writer/director Cochran is stronger on capturing the texture surrounding her characters' converging experiences than making much of it when they do get together.
March 23, 2005
Haas and Ryder let off some serious sparks, even if the screenplay doesn't
| Original Score: 3/5
August 14, 2002
| Original Score: 3/5
January 14, 2011
As vague and unfocused as its title.
January 14, 2011
What begins as an edgy examination of sheltered, selfish kids making stupid choices devolves into a ludicrously mannered celebration of adolescent rebellion.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
January 14, 2011
The movie's not helped at all by Ryder, who seems uncomfortable playing femme fatale to these grimy-fingered boys, as if she doesn't believe anyone could feel this adulative about her.
February 2, 2008
| Original Score: 2/5
November 17, 2006
| Original Score: 2/5
June 12, 2005
Read More | Original Score: C
June 3, 2005
Read More | Original Score: 2/5
December 18, 2004
Obviously reshot and recut to the point of complete incoherence
| Original Score: 1/5
May 14, 2003
| Original Score: 1/4
August 1, 2002
| Original Score: 1/5
July 26, 2002
Amazingly bland Winona Ryder vehicle.
| Original Score: 2/5
June 5, 2002
A dreadful disappointment of epic proportions.
January 1, 2000
A small, cramped film about an aimless woman in her mid-20s who becomes involved with an innocent prep school student.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
January 1, 2000
Boys is a love story, or at least that's what the film makers would like us to believe. The problem is, there isn't much emotion present.
Full Review | Original Score: 1.5/4
January 1, 2000
Boys must think audiences are not very bright.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
January 1, 2000
It is essentially a coming-of-age movie, but the circumstances are so eccentric and the relationships so unique that Cochran seems to be reaching for something more inscrutable, more ambiguous.
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