Scream Reviews

  • 4d ago

    Scream does not take it too seriously and has fun with it. Many fantastic performances and a very thrilling mystery.

    Scream does not take it too seriously and has fun with it. Many fantastic performances and a very thrilling mystery.

  • 5d ago

    This is how you do a satirical take on horror movies

    This is how you do a satirical take on horror movies

  • Aug 14, 2019

    This was the movie that resurrected the horror genre in the 90's. It was self-referential of other horror movies, funny, and had plenty of thrills. It also had a great finale that i didn't see coming. Well one half anyway. A great 90's horror.

    This was the movie that resurrected the horror genre in the 90's. It was self-referential of other horror movies, funny, and had plenty of thrills. It also had a great finale that i didn't see coming. Well one half anyway. A great 90's horror.

  • Aug 13, 2019

    Hands down, One of the best opening horror sequences I’ve ever seen. It’s terrifying

    Hands down, One of the best opening horror sequences I’ve ever seen. It’s terrifying

  • Aug 10, 2019

    Pretty clever, pretty knowing, and a lot of fun. It was suspenseful, and well worth it. A good slasher that ressurrect the formula, but now is forgotten about. One of the best out of the 90's. Highly recommend.

    Pretty clever, pretty knowing, and a lot of fun. It was suspenseful, and well worth it. A good slasher that ressurrect the formula, but now is forgotten about. One of the best out of the 90's. Highly recommend.

  • Jul 29, 2019

    My personal favorite slasher film. Matthew Lillard's over acting at the end is what sells it for me.

    My personal favorite slasher film. Matthew Lillard's over acting at the end is what sells it for me.

  • Jul 26, 2019

    Arguably the best film within the slasher subgenre of Horror since John Carpenter's 1978 classic, "Halloween." The most fascinating thing that has always made SCREAM so damn great, (for me at least), is that screenwriter Kevin Williamson looked back upon hundreds of forgettable slasher films from the 80's and decided to turn the use Craven's previous franchise film formula against the audience. To put it bluntly: Wes Craven deserves credit for being the director who was able to realize Williamson's relentless genre-tear-down of a screenplay, sure, but in my opinion the lion's share of applause has always been reserved for script & the *incredible* ensemble cast; especially considering Drew Barrymore — who famously begged for the part of "Casey" rather than the role Dimension studios was prepared to hand her on a silver platter, ("Sidney Prescott" aka the now iconic Nev Campbell post-modern Final Girl of Horror cinema). SCREAM has meant many things to all sorts of Horror fans since it became the mid-90's cultural phenomenon, essentially holding the torch Twin Peaks had passed on after that show's tragic end in ‘92 and until the 1999 when two other Horror films would usher genre fans into the new millennium with much to celebrate, (The Blair Witch Project & The Sixth Sense). It's interesting to look back now as a 30 something year old and consider what SCREAM means to me now, and if I had to say anything about it, it'd be along the lines of this: "SCREAM" was both a love-letter and a strong ultimatum given to Hollywood studios; while so much of the film is meant to be fun & very tongue-in-cheek, the brutality of its more serious moments are still effectively chilling, bleak, and pretty much nihilistic. SCREAM was the 90's very own, "Cabin In The Woods," genre-deconstruction & Horror Dissertation jumbled into one...Kevin Williamson was the hero we needed to kick studios, directors, and other writers in the ass & make them remember what this genre is supposed to be about, rather than simply giving audiences a kill and nudity scene every 12 minutes while checking boxes on a list of arbitrarily made up rules that somehow served as the blueprint for how each beat of a slasher flick should go. In 2012, (well more like 2009 but that's MGM's fault, you don't want to get into it...), The Cabin In The Woods by Drew Goddard & Joss Whedon would serve the same purpose by hitting the "reset" button on the Horror genre — it's a pity that within less than a year that The Cabin In The Woods put the industry back on tilt we were already somehow flooded with the same terribly predictable popcorn "jump-scare" (read: loud noises) trash when the box office numbers for The Conjuring & Sinister had apparently told studio executives that it was okay to keep giving us garbage Horror...pity. [Note: I just wanted to say that Sinister was THIS CLOSE to actually being a pretty okay or perhaps even solid Horror film...but then some stupid editor or executive made them throw in a nonsensical boogeyman breaking the fourth wall jump scare (not actual scare, just loud noise and cut to close up on demon guy or whatever), which completely undercut EVERYTHING that was effective in the previous 1hr45min of the film. Sinister is basically the equivalent to a person about to win a Olympic gold medal but right before the finish line they take a pistol out of their shorts and kneecap themselves...like on purpose...]

    Arguably the best film within the slasher subgenre of Horror since John Carpenter's 1978 classic, "Halloween." The most fascinating thing that has always made SCREAM so damn great, (for me at least), is that screenwriter Kevin Williamson looked back upon hundreds of forgettable slasher films from the 80's and decided to turn the use Craven's previous franchise film formula against the audience. To put it bluntly: Wes Craven deserves credit for being the director who was able to realize Williamson's relentless genre-tear-down of a screenplay, sure, but in my opinion the lion's share of applause has always been reserved for script & the *incredible* ensemble cast; especially considering Drew Barrymore — who famously begged for the part of "Casey" rather than the role Dimension studios was prepared to hand her on a silver platter, ("Sidney Prescott" aka the now iconic Nev Campbell post-modern Final Girl of Horror cinema). SCREAM has meant many things to all sorts of Horror fans since it became the mid-90's cultural phenomenon, essentially holding the torch Twin Peaks had passed on after that show's tragic end in ‘92 and until the 1999 when two other Horror films would usher genre fans into the new millennium with much to celebrate, (The Blair Witch Project & The Sixth Sense). It's interesting to look back now as a 30 something year old and consider what SCREAM means to me now, and if I had to say anything about it, it'd be along the lines of this: "SCREAM" was both a love-letter and a strong ultimatum given to Hollywood studios; while so much of the film is meant to be fun & very tongue-in-cheek, the brutality of its more serious moments are still effectively chilling, bleak, and pretty much nihilistic. SCREAM was the 90's very own, "Cabin In The Woods," genre-deconstruction & Horror Dissertation jumbled into one...Kevin Williamson was the hero we needed to kick studios, directors, and other writers in the ass & make them remember what this genre is supposed to be about, rather than simply giving audiences a kill and nudity scene every 12 minutes while checking boxes on a list of arbitrarily made up rules that somehow served as the blueprint for how each beat of a slasher flick should go. In 2012, (well more like 2009 but that's MGM's fault, you don't want to get into it...), The Cabin In The Woods by Drew Goddard & Joss Whedon would serve the same purpose by hitting the "reset" button on the Horror genre — it's a pity that within less than a year that The Cabin In The Woods put the industry back on tilt we were already somehow flooded with the same terribly predictable popcorn "jump-scare" (read: loud noises) trash when the box office numbers for The Conjuring & Sinister had apparently told studio executives that it was okay to keep giving us garbage Horror...pity. [Note: I just wanted to say that Sinister was THIS CLOSE to actually being a pretty okay or perhaps even solid Horror film...but then some stupid editor or executive made them throw in a nonsensical boogeyman breaking the fourth wall jump scare (not actual scare, just loud noise and cut to close up on demon guy or whatever), which completely undercut EVERYTHING that was effective in the previous 1hr45min of the film. Sinister is basically the equivalent to a person about to win a Olympic gold medal but right before the finish line they take a pistol out of their shorts and kneecap themselves...like on purpose...]

  • Jul 12, 2019

    An amazing film that changed the horror genre for the better

    An amazing film that changed the horror genre for the better

  • Jul 04, 2019

    Scream is cheesy, but the good kind. Not a "scary movie" per say, but a movie that would be good to watch when you're bored and need a little bit of enjoyment if you get it watching people be puzzled about a killer that is very easy to deduce. The plot was very predictable, including the actual killer identity, but the acting was fairly decent. Definitely recommend if you love cheesy movies/scary movies that are not EXTREMELY scary.

    Scream is cheesy, but the good kind. Not a "scary movie" per say, but a movie that would be good to watch when you're bored and need a little bit of enjoyment if you get it watching people be puzzled about a killer that is very easy to deduce. The plot was very predictable, including the actual killer identity, but the acting was fairly decent. Definitely recommend if you love cheesy movies/scary movies that are not EXTREMELY scary.

  • Jul 04, 2019

    Scream is an impressive Wes Craven creation that manages to glorify itself by using common horror cliches to its advantage. While the movie's plot has plenty of preposterous scenes and uncommon human behavior. You can't help but overlook them as it is exactly what they were going for and it worked. We have plenty of bone chilling slasher moments to keep you on the edge of your seat. A great screenplay that the actors managed to perfect gracefully. With also lots of clever commentary and unexpecting twists to leave you more than satisfied with the end result.

    Scream is an impressive Wes Craven creation that manages to glorify itself by using common horror cliches to its advantage. While the movie's plot has plenty of preposterous scenes and uncommon human behavior. You can't help but overlook them as it is exactly what they were going for and it worked. We have plenty of bone chilling slasher moments to keep you on the edge of your seat. A great screenplay that the actors managed to perfect gracefully. With also lots of clever commentary and unexpecting twists to leave you more than satisfied with the end result.