Incubus Reviews

  • Sep 13, 2018

    The Esperanto and the B&W really add to the sense of "elseness." Shatner still sounds like shatner in any language. Interesting film.

    The Esperanto and the B&W really add to the sense of "elseness." Shatner still sounds like shatner in any language. Interesting film.

  • Jan 08, 2018

    Un proyecto que sin duda es interesante y que es toda una joya oculta para aquellos que somos seguidores del género del terror. Para empezar, como elementos positivos, contamos con algunas actuaciones bastante interesantes, a pesar del hecho de que se tuvo que grabar en Esperanto, y William Shatner demuestra sus tablas y que sin duda tendría que haber aparecido en muchas más cintas del género. La realización es más bien correcta aunque si es cierto que tenemos algunos planos sobrecogedores y que demuestran que tener un presupuesto pequeño no supone un problema para crear cine bello que provoca sensaciones. El uso del esperanto como idioma para la película es posiblemente lo mejor de la película. Aunque en un principio parece que es un simple "gimmick" para una película que cuenta una historia bastante pobre, lo cierto es que el idioma aporta cierta sensación de extrañeza que ayuda a toda la atmósfera. Si queréis escuchar un análisis en mayor profundidad, escuchad nuestro episodio en ETNTP: www.ivoox.com/terror-no-tiene-podcast-episodio-42-audios-mp3_rf_22443713_1.html

    Un proyecto que sin duda es interesante y que es toda una joya oculta para aquellos que somos seguidores del género del terror. Para empezar, como elementos positivos, contamos con algunas actuaciones bastante interesantes, a pesar del hecho de que se tuvo que grabar en Esperanto, y William Shatner demuestra sus tablas y que sin duda tendría que haber aparecido en muchas más cintas del género. La realización es más bien correcta aunque si es cierto que tenemos algunos planos sobrecogedores y que demuestran que tener un presupuesto pequeño no supone un problema para crear cine bello que provoca sensaciones. El uso del esperanto como idioma para la película es posiblemente lo mejor de la película. Aunque en un principio parece que es un simple "gimmick" para una película que cuenta una historia bastante pobre, lo cierto es que el idioma aporta cierta sensación de extrañeza que ayuda a toda la atmósfera. Si queréis escuchar un análisis en mayor profundidad, escuchad nuestro episodio en ETNTP: www.ivoox.com/terror-no-tiene-podcast-episodio-42-audios-mp3_rf_22443713_1.html

  • Jan 13, 2017

    Incubus (1966) 74m. ??? D: Leslie Stevens. William Shatner, Allyson Ames, Milos Milos. A genuine curio if there ever was one: surprisingly eerie, effective horror story about pretty demon Ames who's intent of manipulating Shatner crumbles when she unwillingly falls in love. Lost for over 30 years . . . and remains only film in history to use spoken-language of Esperanza. Well-made, impressively shot by Conrad Hall (IN COLD BLOOD).

    Incubus (1966) 74m. ??? D: Leslie Stevens. William Shatner, Allyson Ames, Milos Milos. A genuine curio if there ever was one: surprisingly eerie, effective horror story about pretty demon Ames who's intent of manipulating Shatner crumbles when she unwillingly falls in love. Lost for over 30 years . . . and remains only film in history to use spoken-language of Esperanza. Well-made, impressively shot by Conrad Hall (IN COLD BLOOD).

  • May 20, 2015

    Pre- Star Trek William Shatner speaking Esperanto is more than enough, but stunning black and white cinematography, a new twist on good and evil and a curse make this one of my all time favs.

    Pre- Star Trek William Shatner speaking Esperanto is more than enough, but stunning black and white cinematography, a new twist on good and evil and a curse make this one of my all time favs.

  • Oct 29, 2014

    More than just a novelty (the first...and so far, only...movie ever made in the "universal" language of Esperanto), this is an interesting and effective piece of work on many levels. Directed by "The Outer Limits" creator Leslie Stevens, the film spins the tale of a beautiful succubus, (Allyson Ames, who eventually became Stevens' wife) endeavouring to entrap a heroic, virtuous man (William Shatner) into the clutches of her master, the God of Darkness. The story often feels like it's part Bergman-esque Greek tragi-drama and part supernatural horror film. Some clever plot devices, such as a solar eclipse, match the mood perfectly and work well to advance the narrative. There are a few spots of clunky dialogue to be sure, almost certain to elicit a chuckle or two, but it hardly matters. Enhancing the spookiness of the proceedings is Conrad Hall's artistically expressionistic, brilliantly-lighted, and shadow-laden cinematography. No less creepy is the actor who plays the titular incubus, Milos Milos (yes, that's right, two given names), especially when armed with the knowledge of his notorious fate. As for the Esperanto, apart from the initial strangeness of the idea, its execution actually adds something to the authenticity and flavour of this chronicle that just happens to take place in an alternate, mythical land, close to ours in nature.

    More than just a novelty (the first...and so far, only...movie ever made in the "universal" language of Esperanto), this is an interesting and effective piece of work on many levels. Directed by "The Outer Limits" creator Leslie Stevens, the film spins the tale of a beautiful succubus, (Allyson Ames, who eventually became Stevens' wife) endeavouring to entrap a heroic, virtuous man (William Shatner) into the clutches of her master, the God of Darkness. The story often feels like it's part Bergman-esque Greek tragi-drama and part supernatural horror film. Some clever plot devices, such as a solar eclipse, match the mood perfectly and work well to advance the narrative. There are a few spots of clunky dialogue to be sure, almost certain to elicit a chuckle or two, but it hardly matters. Enhancing the spookiness of the proceedings is Conrad Hall's artistically expressionistic, brilliantly-lighted, and shadow-laden cinematography. No less creepy is the actor who plays the titular incubus, Milos Milos (yes, that's right, two given names), especially when armed with the knowledge of his notorious fate. As for the Esperanto, apart from the initial strangeness of the idea, its execution actually adds something to the authenticity and flavour of this chronicle that just happens to take place in an alternate, mythical land, close to ours in nature.

  • Mar 03, 2014

    Delirious film defies description; the fact that the dialogue is spoken in Esperanto makes it even stranger.

    Delirious film defies description; the fact that the dialogue is spoken in Esperanto makes it even stranger.

  • Dec 24, 2013

    It's one of the few movies out there made completely in Esperanto (go ahead, Google it if you don't know it...it is an interesting concept). This is one of those very few movies out there that if you gave two shits about Esperanto than you just might like this movie. For all others, do not bother. It is duller than a plastic spork.

    It's one of the few movies out there made completely in Esperanto (go ahead, Google it if you don't know it...it is an interesting concept). This is one of those very few movies out there that if you gave two shits about Esperanto than you just might like this movie. For all others, do not bother. It is duller than a plastic spork.

  • Dec 14, 2013

    Esperanto is alive and well, with THOUSANDS of activists meeting in conferences, whose main purpose is FRIENDSHIP at the same time advancing translations and original literature. The Esperanto community on-line is doubling in size every few years and is estimated to be in the hundreds of thousands.

    Esperanto is alive and well, with THOUSANDS of activists meeting in conferences, whose main purpose is FRIENDSHIP at the same time advancing translations and original literature. The Esperanto community on-line is doubling in size every few years and is estimated to be in the hundreds of thousands.

  • Nov 29, 2013

    An obscure oddity well worth seeking out--An arrestingly off-beat & atmospheric mid 60's Art-House Horror!!

    An obscure oddity well worth seeking out--An arrestingly off-beat & atmospheric mid 60's Art-House Horror!!

  • Oct 23, 2013

    Too strange to be awful, a foreign language film made in the neutral language of Esperanto! William Shatner speaking in tongues, lots of fog machines, lovely 1960's babes, great Dominic Frontiere music and a really silly story about the devil and God. Basically what would happen if Ingmar Bergman directed an episode of Outer Limits.

    Too strange to be awful, a foreign language film made in the neutral language of Esperanto! William Shatner speaking in tongues, lots of fog machines, lovely 1960's babes, great Dominic Frontiere music and a really silly story about the devil and God. Basically what would happen if Ingmar Bergman directed an episode of Outer Limits.