The Sunshine Boys Reviews

  • Jul 25, 2019

    Peter Falk, Woody Allen and Sarah Jessica Parker in a movie together? Someone knows how to cast.

    Peter Falk, Woody Allen and Sarah Jessica Parker in a movie together? Someone knows how to cast.

  • Aug 22, 2017

    #WoodyAllenRetro Podcast Project and we get to another Woody helmed tv movie with, as always, great acting but again with these play/movies not alot of meat and variety to make it shine* - peter falk is great BUT his character is exceedingly unlikeable.. to the point it becomes distracting, Sarah JP is bland not given much to do - there is a great 5 min surprise cameo by Whoppi G and Woody himself solely leaves the movie totally unscathed and is very likeable throughout - sadly after the first 30mins you have seen all this one has to offer and unless re-written with more scope, different scenes and an actual character arc for peter falk this can seem like a painful slog to get through - again, not the actors fault, the script and the execution is little more than the camera on our two main characters in a series of arguments for over an hour and it's just not fun and overly sustainable

    #WoodyAllenRetro Podcast Project and we get to another Woody helmed tv movie with, as always, great acting but again with these play/movies not alot of meat and variety to make it shine* - peter falk is great BUT his character is exceedingly unlikeable.. to the point it becomes distracting, Sarah JP is bland not given much to do - there is a great 5 min surprise cameo by Whoppi G and Woody himself solely leaves the movie totally unscathed and is very likeable throughout - sadly after the first 30mins you have seen all this one has to offer and unless re-written with more scope, different scenes and an actual character arc for peter falk this can seem like a painful slog to get through - again, not the actors fault, the script and the execution is little more than the camera on our two main characters in a series of arguments for over an hour and it's just not fun and overly sustainable

  • Oct 07, 2014

    Review: I enjoyed the banter between Falk &  Allen, which Falk dominated, and I liked the chemistry between the 2 characters. Watching them grow old together was sweat and funny in parts and it was good to see another side to Falk who everyone knows as Colombo. You can tell that the film was adapted from a play because it's mostly based around conversations between the 2 comics who are trying to get along so they can make a movie. It didn't get a major release, like the Matthau and Burns version, because it was made for TV but it's a watchable movie with fast jokes and clever wit. Watchable! Round-Up: After all of the Colombo reruns around the world, Peter Falk is definitely a household name. Famous for his trench coat and cigar, it's hard to watch him without thinking of him cracking some crime is his unique way. In this film he stands toe to toe with Woody Allen and he proves that in his later years, he still could pull off a great performance. Woody Allen was pretty toned down but he still pulled out some funny lines which were well written by Neil Simon. It's not as good as the Mathhau/Burns version, but it's worth a watch, just to compare to two. I recommend this movie to people who are into there comedies about 2 old school comedians with a rocky relationship, who join up to make a movie. 5/10

    Review: I enjoyed the banter between Falk &  Allen, which Falk dominated, and I liked the chemistry between the 2 characters. Watching them grow old together was sweat and funny in parts and it was good to see another side to Falk who everyone knows as Colombo. You can tell that the film was adapted from a play because it's mostly based around conversations between the 2 comics who are trying to get along so they can make a movie. It didn't get a major release, like the Matthau and Burns version, because it was made for TV but it's a watchable movie with fast jokes and clever wit. Watchable! Round-Up: After all of the Colombo reruns around the world, Peter Falk is definitely a household name. Famous for his trench coat and cigar, it's hard to watch him without thinking of him cracking some crime is his unique way. In this film he stands toe to toe with Woody Allen and he proves that in his later years, he still could pull off a great performance. Woody Allen was pretty toned down but he still pulled out some funny lines which were well written by Neil Simon. It's not as good as the Mathhau/Burns version, but it's worth a watch, just to compare to two. I recommend this movie to people who are into there comedies about 2 old school comedians with a rocky relationship, who join up to make a movie. 5/10

  • Jun 28, 2013

    skip this and see the 1975 version

    skip this and see the 1975 version

  • Feb 10, 2013

    Passable. Woody Allen is pretty funny in the film. Sarah Jessica Parker plays a sweet character. Peter Falk's character is pretty unlikeable. Woody Allen's character is somewhat likeable. The writing seems very formulaic. Not Neil Simon's best work.

    Passable. Woody Allen is pretty funny in the film. Sarah Jessica Parker plays a sweet character. Peter Falk's character is pretty unlikeable. Woody Allen's character is somewhat likeable. The writing seems very formulaic. Not Neil Simon's best work.

  • Jun 08, 2012

    Eh. Peter Falk was pretty annoying here. Like honestly. Maybe the script is outdated. Maybe I am not old enough. I don't know. Woody Allen was the only saving grace in this whole thing. But god damn did Peter Falk's character get annoying. He wasn't even funny ANY of the time. He was just an annoying old man. The type of old man that doesn't shut the fuck up at family parties and you just look for ways to get out of conversations. Well this movie is 90 minutes with that old man. The best part is when Woody Allen takes the roll of the viewer with his reaction to the old man. This is definitely a made for TV film and if Woody Allen wasn't in it I wouldn't recommend it to a soul. Good enough concept but the execution was poor.

    Eh. Peter Falk was pretty annoying here. Like honestly. Maybe the script is outdated. Maybe I am not old enough. I don't know. Woody Allen was the only saving grace in this whole thing. But god damn did Peter Falk's character get annoying. He wasn't even funny ANY of the time. He was just an annoying old man. The type of old man that doesn't shut the fuck up at family parties and you just look for ways to get out of conversations. Well this movie is 90 minutes with that old man. The best part is when Woody Allen takes the roll of the viewer with his reaction to the old man. This is definitely a made for TV film and if Woody Allen wasn't in it I wouldn't recommend it to a soul. Good enough concept but the execution was poor.

  • Mar 09, 2012

    The jokes were ok, and both Allen and Falk play their respective characters very convinsingly. But still, there was something missing that made the movie a fun one to watch.

    The jokes were ok, and both Allen and Falk play their respective characters very convinsingly. But still, there was something missing that made the movie a fun one to watch.

  • Nov 26, 2011

    This is a mildly amusing but ultimately not-terribly-special made-for-TV adaptation of the Neil Simon play (which was previously made into an Oscar-nominated movie in 1975, but I haven't seen that version yet). I mainly watched it because it's one of the few movies Woody Allen acted in that he didn't also write. I can see how this would work as a live play, but as a movie, it's a bit dull. The story deals with a couple of cranky old comedians who were once a popular Martin-and-Lewis style duo, but who have long since parted ways on less than amicable terms. One day, an opportunity for a dual role in a movie turns up, and the niece of one of the comedians tries to convince them to reunite for the part, which would be great if they could only stop bickering. And that's basically what the movie is: two bitter old guys bickering with each other. One of them, played by Peter Falk, is older and more bitter and way less reasonable than the other, played by Woody Allen. Falk is appropriately crusty and grouchy and ornery here, almost a parody of Peter Falk, though his character basically maintains that pitch throughout. By the end, you get kind of sick of him, since he almost never changes. Woody Allen's character is funny, and less of a neurotic than the ones he usually plays. For both characters, nearly every line they say seems like it comes from their old comedy act, and some of the jokes are really pretty funny. There's nothing particularly unusual about the movie's visual style - it looks and sounds like it was made for TV. This is worth checking out if you're a fan of Falk or Allen, but don't expect anything too amazing from it.

    This is a mildly amusing but ultimately not-terribly-special made-for-TV adaptation of the Neil Simon play (which was previously made into an Oscar-nominated movie in 1975, but I haven't seen that version yet). I mainly watched it because it's one of the few movies Woody Allen acted in that he didn't also write. I can see how this would work as a live play, but as a movie, it's a bit dull. The story deals with a couple of cranky old comedians who were once a popular Martin-and-Lewis style duo, but who have long since parted ways on less than amicable terms. One day, an opportunity for a dual role in a movie turns up, and the niece of one of the comedians tries to convince them to reunite for the part, which would be great if they could only stop bickering. And that's basically what the movie is: two bitter old guys bickering with each other. One of them, played by Peter Falk, is older and more bitter and way less reasonable than the other, played by Woody Allen. Falk is appropriately crusty and grouchy and ornery here, almost a parody of Peter Falk, though his character basically maintains that pitch throughout. By the end, you get kind of sick of him, since he almost never changes. Woody Allen's character is funny, and less of a neurotic than the ones he usually plays. For both characters, nearly every line they say seems like it comes from their old comedy act, and some of the jokes are really pretty funny. There's nothing particularly unusual about the movie's visual style - it looks and sounds like it was made for TV. This is worth checking out if you're a fan of Falk or Allen, but don't expect anything too amazing from it.

  • Sunil J Super Reviewer
    Nov 25, 2011

    Yuck. This was a pretty bad adaptation for tv. Allen is okay the humor doesn't deliver. Falk just seems cranky and irritating.

    Yuck. This was a pretty bad adaptation for tv. Allen is okay the humor doesn't deliver. Falk just seems cranky and irritating.

  • Jul 27, 2011

    While not quite as charming as the original 1975 version of the play, I really like aspects of this remake. While in the original Walter Matthau embodied his character much more than Peter Falk does, I really like Woody Allen's take on Al Lewis. George Burns was funny, but his overly subtle character always faded into the background next to Matthau's. Allen's over-the-top neuroticism makes his Lewis a great opponent for Willie Clark. Some of the updated lines don't quite work and Sarah Jessica Parker is really wooden as Clark's niece, but overall, pretty entertaining.

    While not quite as charming as the original 1975 version of the play, I really like aspects of this remake. While in the original Walter Matthau embodied his character much more than Peter Falk does, I really like Woody Allen's take on Al Lewis. George Burns was funny, but his overly subtle character always faded into the background next to Matthau's. Allen's over-the-top neuroticism makes his Lewis a great opponent for Willie Clark. Some of the updated lines don't quite work and Sarah Jessica Parker is really wooden as Clark's niece, but overall, pretty entertaining.