Fireworks (Hana-bi) Reviews

  • Jan 19, 2019

    I saw "Dolls" last week, so this was my second Takeshi Kitano flick in a few days. This is similiar, but also so very different. A cop has a sick wife fighting leukemia. At the same time a partner of his got shot and is becoming sucidal as he is being confined to a wheelchair. While his friend is coping with it by painting some pictures, out main man is turning into a yakuza as he quit his regular job. There are many killings here, some amount of blood and a bit of action. I guess his wife never knew much about it but when he is around her he is a very different man. This film is sad, brutal and sad. The murder scenes look really realistic and the way the man has two very different lives and outer shells is making and impact. It's prety well shot, and there are glimmers of the great scenery and camera usage that "Dolls" had. For me it's not as good, even if the story has a bit faster pace. It's not fast, though, even a bit too slow at times. A solid drama and a clash of beauty and violence, the gentle and the rugged side of a man knowing his true passion is dying. Artsy but also rather typical, and the mix is OK, but not great for me. 6.5 out of 10 tire chains.

    I saw "Dolls" last week, so this was my second Takeshi Kitano flick in a few days. This is similiar, but also so very different. A cop has a sick wife fighting leukemia. At the same time a partner of his got shot and is becoming sucidal as he is being confined to a wheelchair. While his friend is coping with it by painting some pictures, out main man is turning into a yakuza as he quit his regular job. There are many killings here, some amount of blood and a bit of action. I guess his wife never knew much about it but when he is around her he is a very different man. This film is sad, brutal and sad. The murder scenes look really realistic and the way the man has two very different lives and outer shells is making and impact. It's prety well shot, and there are glimmers of the great scenery and camera usage that "Dolls" had. For me it's not as good, even if the story has a bit faster pace. It's not fast, though, even a bit too slow at times. A solid drama and a clash of beauty and violence, the gentle and the rugged side of a man knowing his true passion is dying. Artsy but also rather typical, and the mix is OK, but not great for me. 6.5 out of 10 tire chains.

  • Jan 20, 2018

    Much like American filmmakers beforehand, the main character who is driven to desperate measures to serve something greater and there is a voyeuristic view withing each scene. Takeshi Kitano takes all of those plus tugs on heartstrings on the unconditional love he gives his friends and family. In exchange, it costs him his sanity and in turn his life. The way the film is shot and edited gives us a dreamy happiness in a dreary world. Most films can't have it achieve either way without teetering one or the other. Do we feel sorry for this troubled figure especially who is willing to give more than he is capable of? Well, that's up for the viewers to decide. Good movies like this can achieve in holding that idea in your head long after you finish watching.

    Much like American filmmakers beforehand, the main character who is driven to desperate measures to serve something greater and there is a voyeuristic view withing each scene. Takeshi Kitano takes all of those plus tugs on heartstrings on the unconditional love he gives his friends and family. In exchange, it costs him his sanity and in turn his life. The way the film is shot and edited gives us a dreamy happiness in a dreary world. Most films can't have it achieve either way without teetering one or the other. Do we feel sorry for this troubled figure especially who is willing to give more than he is capable of? Well, that's up for the viewers to decide. Good movies like this can achieve in holding that idea in your head long after you finish watching.

  • Apr 04, 2017

    Melancholily scored by Joe Hisaishi and showcasing aesthetic art pieces by the director himself, Takeshi Kitano slow burns with this very pensive cop drama about an ill-starred policeman commanding sudden bursts of violence and unexpected acts of benevolence in a thug life he did not choose.

    Melancholily scored by Joe Hisaishi and showcasing aesthetic art pieces by the director himself, Takeshi Kitano slow burns with this very pensive cop drama about an ill-starred policeman commanding sudden bursts of violence and unexpected acts of benevolence in a thug life he did not choose.

  • Sep 21, 2015

    Understated for the sake of underlining its existential musings, Hana-Bi evokes an overwhelming sense of both extreme sadness and extreme joy, choosing to observe man at his most violent as well as his most open. It would be nearly impossible for a lesser director to reconcile these two styles in a way that is both cohesive and constructive in terms of tone, but Kitano pulls it off so that these conflicting sources of tension manifest themselves in such a way that the effect isn't the least bit uncomfortable and is, instead, entirely unforgettable.

    Understated for the sake of underlining its existential musings, Hana-Bi evokes an overwhelming sense of both extreme sadness and extreme joy, choosing to observe man at his most violent as well as his most open. It would be nearly impossible for a lesser director to reconcile these two styles in a way that is both cohesive and constructive in terms of tone, but Kitano pulls it off so that these conflicting sources of tension manifest themselves in such a way that the effect isn't the least bit uncomfortable and is, instead, entirely unforgettable.

  • May 13, 2015

    Récompensé à Venise, le septième film de Kitano Takeshi est un remarquable drame sur un ancien policier qui décide de partir en voyage avec sa femme très malade. Tantôt très émouvant, tantôt hilarant, tantôt effroyablement violent, Hana-Bi est surtout constamment beau, que ce soit visuellement ou idéologiquement, grâce à une réalisation qui prend son temps sans non plus tirer en longueur et des acteurs fabuleux, Kitano en tête, Kishimoto Kayoko et Terajima Susumu tout autant dans un autre registre. Dommage que le film ait un ventre mou.

    Récompensé à Venise, le septième film de Kitano Takeshi est un remarquable drame sur un ancien policier qui décide de partir en voyage avec sa femme très malade. Tantôt très émouvant, tantôt hilarant, tantôt effroyablement violent, Hana-Bi est surtout constamment beau, que ce soit visuellement ou idéologiquement, grâce à une réalisation qui prend son temps sans non plus tirer en longueur et des acteurs fabuleux, Kitano en tête, Kishimoto Kayoko et Terajima Susumu tout autant dans un autre registre. Dommage que le film ait un ventre mou.

  • Jun 25, 2014

    O filme se divide entre ternura e violência extremas, narrando a trajetória do detetive Nishi, um homem guiado por ideais de amizade e lealdade. Sua vida, porém, sofre uma reviravolta quando ele vem a saber que sua mulher tem uma doença terminal. Logo que sai do hospital, ainda abalado pela drástica situação da mulher, recebe a notícia de que seu amigo e parceiro foi baleado numa emboscada da Máfia. Semanas depois, ele visita o companheiro, que está numa cadeira de rodas e vivendo numa casa à beira-mar. Atormentado pelos eventos que afetaram a vida daqueles que ele mais ama, Nishi, decide abandonar a polícia. Tudo o que quer é dar conforto à mulher e ao amigo. E ele não poupa esforços para isso, mesmo que seja preciso radicalizar toda sua existência.

    O filme se divide entre ternura e violência extremas, narrando a trajetória do detetive Nishi, um homem guiado por ideais de amizade e lealdade. Sua vida, porém, sofre uma reviravolta quando ele vem a saber que sua mulher tem uma doença terminal. Logo que sai do hospital, ainda abalado pela drástica situação da mulher, recebe a notícia de que seu amigo e parceiro foi baleado numa emboscada da Máfia. Semanas depois, ele visita o companheiro, que está numa cadeira de rodas e vivendo numa casa à beira-mar. Atormentado pelos eventos que afetaram a vida daqueles que ele mais ama, Nishi, decide abandonar a polícia. Tudo o que quer é dar conforto à mulher e ao amigo. E ele não poupa esforços para isso, mesmo que seja preciso radicalizar toda sua existência.

  • Nov 08, 2013

    Violent yet beautiful in its meditation on alienation and the want of love.

    Violent yet beautiful in its meditation on alienation and the want of love.

  • Jun 12, 2013

    Existential, funny, violent, sentimental, confusing.

    Existential, funny, violent, sentimental, confusing.

  • Apr 23, 2013

    Fun Fact: Takeshi Kitano, der Regisseur und Star zahlreicher, eher ernster und teilweise sehr brutaler Filme, ist auch der Namensgeber der TV-Serie Takeshi's Castle", die sich in meiner Kindheit sehr großer Beliebtheit meinerseits erfreut hat. Hana-Bi", Kitanos erster Film, der auf einen katastrophalen Motorradsturz im Jahre 1994 folgte thematisiert stark dieses Ereignis. Unterstützt von seinen eigenen Malereien, die er seit seinem Unfall angefertigt hatte, erzählt Hana-Bi" die Geschichte zweier Männer. Beide waren sie Partner bei der Polizei, doch Horibe (Ren Osugi) wurde bei einem Routineeinsatz schwer verwundet und ist seither gelähmt. Der gleiche Mann, der Horibe verkrüppelte ist auch indirekt für die Beendigung Nishis (Takeshi Kitano) Laufbahn verantwortlich. Beim Versuch ihn zu schnappen tötet er einen weiteren Kollegen und verwundeten einen anderen schwer, und Nishi von Wut und Trauer erfüllt, entleert daraufhin sein gesamtes Magazin auf den Leichnam des toten Verbrechers, nur um danach seinen Dienst zu quittieren und sich um seine totkranke Frau zu kümmern. Der Tod ist also allgegenwärtig. Die Art und Weise wie er thematisiert wird vielschichtig. Horibe, verkrüppelt und verlassen von Frau und Kind wendet sich, autobiographisch inspiriert, der Malerei zu. Nishi hingegen, kapselt sich fast vollkommen von der Welt ab um für seine Frau zu sorgen. Er borgt sich Geld bei der Yakuza, das er nur mittels eines Banküberfalls zurückzahlen kann. Der ehemals ehrenvolle Polizist, der bereits seine junge Tochter verloren hat, und nun auch seine Ehefrau begraben wird müssen, hängt seine Prinzipien an den Nagel, um noch ein letztes Mal das Glück der Liebe erfahren zu können. Immer wieder unterbrochen von Gewaltausbrüchen und blutigen Kämpfen mit Yakuzas handelt der Film eigentlich von der romantischen letzten Reise von Nishi und seiner Frau - ruhig, melancholisch, lieblich. Kitano nutzt Flashbacks und irritierende Schnittmethoden, die stark an die Filme der Nouvelle Vague erinnern, um den Zuseher durchgehend herauszufordern und ihn die Geheimnisse Nishis, somit erst langsam erschließen lässt. Stilistisch beeindruckend, mit Symbolismus überladen, brutal, herausfordernd aber im Innersten melancholisch und ruhig. Ein facettenreicher, einzigartiger Film.

    Fun Fact: Takeshi Kitano, der Regisseur und Star zahlreicher, eher ernster und teilweise sehr brutaler Filme, ist auch der Namensgeber der TV-Serie Takeshi's Castle", die sich in meiner Kindheit sehr großer Beliebtheit meinerseits erfreut hat. Hana-Bi", Kitanos erster Film, der auf einen katastrophalen Motorradsturz im Jahre 1994 folgte thematisiert stark dieses Ereignis. Unterstützt von seinen eigenen Malereien, die er seit seinem Unfall angefertigt hatte, erzählt Hana-Bi" die Geschichte zweier Männer. Beide waren sie Partner bei der Polizei, doch Horibe (Ren Osugi) wurde bei einem Routineeinsatz schwer verwundet und ist seither gelähmt. Der gleiche Mann, der Horibe verkrüppelte ist auch indirekt für die Beendigung Nishis (Takeshi Kitano) Laufbahn verantwortlich. Beim Versuch ihn zu schnappen tötet er einen weiteren Kollegen und verwundeten einen anderen schwer, und Nishi von Wut und Trauer erfüllt, entleert daraufhin sein gesamtes Magazin auf den Leichnam des toten Verbrechers, nur um danach seinen Dienst zu quittieren und sich um seine totkranke Frau zu kümmern. Der Tod ist also allgegenwärtig. Die Art und Weise wie er thematisiert wird vielschichtig. Horibe, verkrüppelt und verlassen von Frau und Kind wendet sich, autobiographisch inspiriert, der Malerei zu. Nishi hingegen, kapselt sich fast vollkommen von der Welt ab um für seine Frau zu sorgen. Er borgt sich Geld bei der Yakuza, das er nur mittels eines Banküberfalls zurückzahlen kann. Der ehemals ehrenvolle Polizist, der bereits seine junge Tochter verloren hat, und nun auch seine Ehefrau begraben wird müssen, hängt seine Prinzipien an den Nagel, um noch ein letztes Mal das Glück der Liebe erfahren zu können. Immer wieder unterbrochen von Gewaltausbrüchen und blutigen Kämpfen mit Yakuzas handelt der Film eigentlich von der romantischen letzten Reise von Nishi und seiner Frau - ruhig, melancholisch, lieblich. Kitano nutzt Flashbacks und irritierende Schnittmethoden, die stark an die Filme der Nouvelle Vague erinnern, um den Zuseher durchgehend herauszufordern und ihn die Geheimnisse Nishis, somit erst langsam erschließen lässt. Stilistisch beeindruckend, mit Symbolismus überladen, brutal, herausfordernd aber im Innersten melancholisch und ruhig. Ein facettenreicher, einzigartiger Film.

  • Mar 29, 2013

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