L.I.E. Reviews

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March 29, 2002
Cox plays the boy-fancier, orange muscle car and all, with a brilliance you have to see to believe.
March 13, 2002
in the end, this is more deservedly bad press for NAMBLA.
December 21, 2001
... the characters are so well-drawn and well-acted and the ideas raised are provocative without being overly exploitive.
November 12, 2001
November 3, 2001
What makes L.I.E. so compelling and disturbing is that in Cox's capable hands, we discover a human being inside the beast.
October 19, 2001
It seems brave, in its restrained fashion, and when Cox is on-screen you feel it's getting close to some uncomfortable truth.
October 19, 2001
Recoiling from L.I.E. is a very human, and frankly a very responsible, reaction.
October 19, 2001
A mature, insightful and extremely well-acted study.
October 16, 2001
... deserves to be seen for the incredibly subtle performances of the two male leads
October 13, 2001
This strangely compelling story shows us that we can never write off any human being as worthless or abominable.
October 9, 2001
Difficult and flawed feature debut.
October 9, 2001
Gripping, troubling, and deftly acted.
October 9, 2001
An achievement of accomplished filmmaking and superb acting, L.I.E. puts you in the tough spot of unraveling how you feel about what you've viewed.
October 9, 2001
One of the most provocative independent films of the year.
October 8, 2001
If you're open-minded and adventurous in your moviegoing, and if you can handle a disturbing but major performance, then by all means see it.
October 8, 2001
Granted, these desires can be conflicted and perplexing, but the representation here reads as a failure of nerve, a refusal to take on an uncomfortable topic.
October 3, 2001
Strong story telling, character development and acting, off-putting subject matter.
October 1, 2001
Sluggish, lurching, and unevenly paced, with some crucial improbabilities in the script.
September 28, 2001
A wonderfully acted film and a courageous one.
September 28, 2001
An original, well-crafted plea that uses restraint instead of titillation to make a cautionary tale that aches with pathos and power.
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