Why We Fight Reviews

  • Feb 04, 2019

    Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki and released in 2006, is a documentary surrounding President Dwight D. Eisenhowerï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s speech during his last day in office. His speech warned against the military-industrial complex, the idea that the combination of federal military actions and arms-dealing contractors could eventually threaten our democracy. This film attempts to convince the viewer to take a closer look at the military actions carried out by our government, and truly consider the reasons why we are in nearly constant war with nations we canï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)t even place on a map. While the film is entertaining, it is unlikely to turn opponents to their side. Most viewers interested in the film most likely begin watching with their own views coinciding with that of the film, leaving little room for genuine change in views. The film effectively uses lighting, music, and interviews with military and government personnel to make their point. The interviews with qualified individuals in politics and the military lend a distinct credibility to the film. There are fallacies within the film which, at first glance, you might not pick up on, but thinking critically of the filmï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s persuasive devices allows the viewer to truly think critically about the film and its message.

    Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki and released in 2006, is a documentary surrounding President Dwight D. Eisenhowerï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s speech during his last day in office. His speech warned against the military-industrial complex, the idea that the combination of federal military actions and arms-dealing contractors could eventually threaten our democracy. This film attempts to convince the viewer to take a closer look at the military actions carried out by our government, and truly consider the reasons why we are in nearly constant war with nations we canï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)t even place on a map. While the film is entertaining, it is unlikely to turn opponents to their side. Most viewers interested in the film most likely begin watching with their own views coinciding with that of the film, leaving little room for genuine change in views. The film effectively uses lighting, music, and interviews with military and government personnel to make their point. The interviews with qualified individuals in politics and the military lend a distinct credibility to the film. There are fallacies within the film which, at first glance, you might not pick up on, but thinking critically of the filmï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s persuasive devices allows the viewer to truly think critically about the film and its message.

  • Feb 04, 2019

    The documentary Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki, attempts to shed light on the reality of war and our motivations behind escalating to such levels. The film employs techniques such as lighting, camera framing, music, and real footage to convey a particular perspective on the audience, who is often unaware of such persuasive strategies. While these methods are used masterfully, others are not. The film quickly jumps from expert to expert, sometimes having each cut of a person talking be only 15-20 seconds long before they cut to the next person. This is hard to follow and confusing for the audience, and makes it very difficult to match a face with a name tag that was shown previously. This discredits the validity of the statements in the film and reduces the credibility of the supposed experts, since the audience cant keep track of each individual and their profession. Overall, its a very sloppy technique that brings the overall effect of the documentary down immensely. Another weakness is the prominent focus on Eisenhowers proclaimed military-industrial complex. This makes the complex seem like the most relevant point, reducing the importance of the other characterâ(TM)s claims and storylines. Now, the reasons to fight as narrated by Wilton Sekzer and William Soloman seem drastically insignificant, even though their reason for fighting is just as relevant. The directors seem to pick and choose what information they are going to highlight in the film by framing certain characters, which is very misleading and paints a false picture for the audience.

    The documentary Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki, attempts to shed light on the reality of war and our motivations behind escalating to such levels. The film employs techniques such as lighting, camera framing, music, and real footage to convey a particular perspective on the audience, who is often unaware of such persuasive strategies. While these methods are used masterfully, others are not. The film quickly jumps from expert to expert, sometimes having each cut of a person talking be only 15-20 seconds long before they cut to the next person. This is hard to follow and confusing for the audience, and makes it very difficult to match a face with a name tag that was shown previously. This discredits the validity of the statements in the film and reduces the credibility of the supposed experts, since the audience cant keep track of each individual and their profession. Overall, its a very sloppy technique that brings the overall effect of the documentary down immensely. Another weakness is the prominent focus on Eisenhowers proclaimed military-industrial complex. This makes the complex seem like the most relevant point, reducing the importance of the other characterâ(TM)s claims and storylines. Now, the reasons to fight as narrated by Wilton Sekzer and William Soloman seem drastically insignificant, even though their reason for fighting is just as relevant. The directors seem to pick and choose what information they are going to highlight in the film by framing certain characters, which is very misleading and paints a false picture for the audience.

  • Feb 03, 2019

    The documentary Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki, explains how Eisenhowerâ(TM)s Military Industrial Complex has been used to justify endless fighting. The film shows that in this process of trying to get ahead, many Americans have forgotten what we are truly fighting for. The documentary attempts to show that the United States government often works to fulfill its own interest, while convincing the American people that they are protecting us and securing our freedom. The documentary shows multiple interviews of people who are either directly involved in war or who have lived through its devastating consequences. In addition, the documentary presents many video clips and images to emphasize the destructive impact of war. This is a very powerful teaching technique because it is more interesting and appealing to the audience, as compared to a typical classroom lecture. The documentary urges the viewer to consider the fact that everything you hear isnâ(TM)t always true. The film teaches people not to blindly trust the government and to be cautious of the possible abuse of power. One problem with the film is that it is highly biased because it only shows the negative results of war, when sometimes war may not avoidable or may be the best option. I would highly recommend this documentary to high school or college students, because it challenges people to consider both sides of a topic and helps to develop individual beliefs and values.

    The documentary Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki, explains how Eisenhowerâ(TM)s Military Industrial Complex has been used to justify endless fighting. The film shows that in this process of trying to get ahead, many Americans have forgotten what we are truly fighting for. The documentary attempts to show that the United States government often works to fulfill its own interest, while convincing the American people that they are protecting us and securing our freedom. The documentary shows multiple interviews of people who are either directly involved in war or who have lived through its devastating consequences. In addition, the documentary presents many video clips and images to emphasize the destructive impact of war. This is a very powerful teaching technique because it is more interesting and appealing to the audience, as compared to a typical classroom lecture. The documentary urges the viewer to consider the fact that everything you hear isnâ(TM)t always true. The film teaches people not to blindly trust the government and to be cautious of the possible abuse of power. One problem with the film is that it is highly biased because it only shows the negative results of war, when sometimes war may not avoidable or may be the best option. I would highly recommend this documentary to high school or college students, because it challenges people to consider both sides of a topic and helps to develop individual beliefs and values.

  • Feb 03, 2019

    ï¿ 1/2Why We Fightï¿ 1/2Â? is a documentary concerning our support for war as a society and the decisions made by our government in times of war. The film is based on the idea of our powerful Military-Industrial Complex. The film utilizes many different interviewees to speak on behalf of our defense system, including John McCain and John D.S. Eisenhower. Those who are interested in following a long, informative film regarding anti-war ideas will benefit from this film. The arguments demonstrated allow the audience to look past our traditional values and ideas. It expresses that we do not simply fight for freedom, democracy, and peace and that those who believe this need to reconsider this idea. This film seems to favor the left side of the political spectrum more than anything. As a teenager still developing my political values, I caught myself almost becoming convinced by many of the arguments in the film despite their lack of evidence. I wouldï¿ 1/2(TM)ve appreciated the film more if it considered the opinions of both sides of the spectrum. The film was also quite hectic, jumping from interviewee to interviewee much too quickly. I felt bombarded with too much information at once, making the film much harder to follow. Jarecki couldï¿ 1/2(TM)ve used fewer interviewees, images, and speeches to get his point across. Overall, the film was not very enjoyable to watch and had my mind spinning.

    ï¿ 1/2Why We Fightï¿ 1/2Â? is a documentary concerning our support for war as a society and the decisions made by our government in times of war. The film is based on the idea of our powerful Military-Industrial Complex. The film utilizes many different interviewees to speak on behalf of our defense system, including John McCain and John D.S. Eisenhower. Those who are interested in following a long, informative film regarding anti-war ideas will benefit from this film. The arguments demonstrated allow the audience to look past our traditional values and ideas. It expresses that we do not simply fight for freedom, democracy, and peace and that those who believe this need to reconsider this idea. This film seems to favor the left side of the political spectrum more than anything. As a teenager still developing my political values, I caught myself almost becoming convinced by many of the arguments in the film despite their lack of evidence. I wouldï¿ 1/2(TM)ve appreciated the film more if it considered the opinions of both sides of the spectrum. The film was also quite hectic, jumping from interviewee to interviewee much too quickly. I felt bombarded with too much information at once, making the film much harder to follow. Jarecki couldï¿ 1/2(TM)ve used fewer interviewees, images, and speeches to get his point across. Overall, the film was not very enjoyable to watch and had my mind spinning.

  • Feb 01, 2019

    ï¿ 1/2 1/2Why we Fightï¿ 1/2 1/2ï¿ 1/2Â? by Eugene Jarecki is a very informative film that has taught me more about the US war system than any history class Iï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)ve ever taken. Although itï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s extremely revealing, the way the information is displayed is not very valuable. Many people are interviewed, from normal US citizens, to veterans, to war historians. All the answers these people give are important, but viewers barley get to see them or remember who they are because the film is very chaotic in how fast it changes scenes. The format makes it hard to focus on one thing or think about someoneï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s opinion for long. Another con of the film was random scenes that just didnï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)t make any sense where they were placed. In a scene showing Jarecki at a war convention, asking people ï¿ 1/2 1/2why do we fight?ï¿ 1/2 1/2ï¿ 1/2Â?, viewers saw more of a man doing magic tricks than actual responses. The magic trick scenes did not fit into the film at all, and I still wonder why Jarecki decided to feature them. Other than a few flaws, I quite enjoyed this film and genuinely learned a lot. It was very refreshing to see many different points of view, from people who know little to nothing about war, to people who have been studying it for years.

    ï¿ 1/2 1/2Why we Fightï¿ 1/2 1/2ï¿ 1/2Â? by Eugene Jarecki is a very informative film that has taught me more about the US war system than any history class Iï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)ve ever taken. Although itï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s extremely revealing, the way the information is displayed is not very valuable. Many people are interviewed, from normal US citizens, to veterans, to war historians. All the answers these people give are important, but viewers barley get to see them or remember who they are because the film is very chaotic in how fast it changes scenes. The format makes it hard to focus on one thing or think about someoneï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s opinion for long. Another con of the film was random scenes that just didnï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)t make any sense where they were placed. In a scene showing Jarecki at a war convention, asking people ï¿ 1/2 1/2why do we fight?ï¿ 1/2 1/2ï¿ 1/2Â?, viewers saw more of a man doing magic tricks than actual responses. The magic trick scenes did not fit into the film at all, and I still wonder why Jarecki decided to feature them. Other than a few flaws, I quite enjoyed this film and genuinely learned a lot. It was very refreshing to see many different points of view, from people who know little to nothing about war, to people who have been studying it for years.

  • Feb 01, 2019

    Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki in 2006, provides detailed and differing views on why Americans support their countriesï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM) wars and why many despise the chaotic havoc that these national battles cause. This film effectively demonizes the major weapons manufacturing corporations, posing the idea that there involvement is solely encouraged by government contracts securing huge profits. This view is backed by many interviews, including a retired police sergeant that lost his son on 9/11, that managed to have is sonï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s name displayed on a bomb dropped in Iraq to only later discover that the Iraq war was unrelated to his sonï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s death. This documentary, however, displays a different view by defending the war with interviews of patriotic Americans partaking in a parade along with a young boy enthusiastically enlisting in the army. Overall, the film may confuse viewers to which side they are defending more, leaving audiences able to make their own decisions on the filmï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s final stance. This documentary effectively uses interviews and primary footage of political figures in order to defend and oppose war actions. These components make the film more credible, giving us real Americanï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s personal stories and feelings regarding war. We as the audience, must take the film with a grain of salt, as we must with all other documentaries, knowing that editing choices can greatly alter the filmï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s tone and accuracy. In order to learn more on the subject, one may want to do some of their own personal research.

    Why We Fight, directed by Eugene Jarecki in 2006, provides detailed and differing views on why Americans support their countriesï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM) wars and why many despise the chaotic havoc that these national battles cause. This film effectively demonizes the major weapons manufacturing corporations, posing the idea that there involvement is solely encouraged by government contracts securing huge profits. This view is backed by many interviews, including a retired police sergeant that lost his son on 9/11, that managed to have is sonï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s name displayed on a bomb dropped in Iraq to only later discover that the Iraq war was unrelated to his sonï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s death. This documentary, however, displays a different view by defending the war with interviews of patriotic Americans partaking in a parade along with a young boy enthusiastically enlisting in the army. Overall, the film may confuse viewers to which side they are defending more, leaving audiences able to make their own decisions on the filmï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s final stance. This documentary effectively uses interviews and primary footage of political figures in order to defend and oppose war actions. These components make the film more credible, giving us real Americanï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s personal stories and feelings regarding war. We as the audience, must take the film with a grain of salt, as we must with all other documentaries, knowing that editing choices can greatly alter the filmï¿ 1/2 1/2(TM)s tone and accuracy. In order to learn more on the subject, one may want to do some of their own personal research.

  • Jan 31, 2019

    Why We Fight, although very scattered is a somewhat informative film. It gives interviews and comments from random United States citizens to veterans and government workers showing a vast array of a cast. Although it is factual, the film is very left leaning on the political spectrum and does not show enough of both political opinions as it should. Yes, Jarecki did fill the film with constant action or emotional appeal to the audience, but if you look over it all, does it really make any sense? Propaganda is a main influencer to the film. Jarecki uses bombast language to dance around the truth throughout the film causing the audience to be misled and confused. An emotional appeal seems to be a must for Jarecki during interviews; such as in the interview with Karen Kwiatkowski, an Air Force veteran who says she would never let her own sons join the military, or Wilton Sekzer, a retired police officer who saw his son get killed in the September 11 terrorist attack. Through the use of these interviews, war videos of children being injured or killed by the bombs of the United States, or the ending scenes showing children and families on fourth of July having a grand time just being American, the film tells you how you should be feeling throughout the entire time and does not let viewers form their own opinions.

    Why We Fight, although very scattered is a somewhat informative film. It gives interviews and comments from random United States citizens to veterans and government workers showing a vast array of a cast. Although it is factual, the film is very left leaning on the political spectrum and does not show enough of both political opinions as it should. Yes, Jarecki did fill the film with constant action or emotional appeal to the audience, but if you look over it all, does it really make any sense? Propaganda is a main influencer to the film. Jarecki uses bombast language to dance around the truth throughout the film causing the audience to be misled and confused. An emotional appeal seems to be a must for Jarecki during interviews; such as in the interview with Karen Kwiatkowski, an Air Force veteran who says she would never let her own sons join the military, or Wilton Sekzer, a retired police officer who saw his son get killed in the September 11 terrorist attack. Through the use of these interviews, war videos of children being injured or killed by the bombs of the United States, or the ending scenes showing children and families on fourth of July having a grand time just being American, the film tells you how you should be feeling throughout the entire time and does not let viewers form their own opinions.

  • Jan 31, 2019

    Why We Fight is a film that strengthened my opinions on war and America. This film also provided knowledge to me from historical backgrounds, as well as personal experiences from people who have either fought, or thought they supported war. This film educated me, and the main points that I got from it are: everybody has a different opinion on war, and people follow rules because it is a societal norm. With people following rules that they were taught to follow, the government sets those standards and in a way brainwashes Americans into thinking was is positive and patriotic. This film definitely has more of a left-wing approach, and demonstrates the destructive side of fighting in a war. One of the people being interviewed shared how not everyone has the same opinion or thoughts on why we fight and why we go to war. If you ask five people why we fight, you will get five different answers. Every American citizen has their own, unique view. One of the interviews includes Wilton Sekzer, a retired NYC cop, who lost his son during 9/11. He goes onto explain how he supported the Iraq War, because we were getting back at them for 9/11. Later, the president reveals that Iraq probably did not have any involvement during 9/11. Sekzer was furious because he was supporting a war that had no real purpose. This goes to show how easily persuaded Americans are by the government. High officials, like the president, will tell American citizens fallacies about wars, in hope it will create fear, which leads to patriotism and support.

    Why We Fight is a film that strengthened my opinions on war and America. This film also provided knowledge to me from historical backgrounds, as well as personal experiences from people who have either fought, or thought they supported war. This film educated me, and the main points that I got from it are: everybody has a different opinion on war, and people follow rules because it is a societal norm. With people following rules that they were taught to follow, the government sets those standards and in a way brainwashes Americans into thinking was is positive and patriotic. This film definitely has more of a left-wing approach, and demonstrates the destructive side of fighting in a war. One of the people being interviewed shared how not everyone has the same opinion or thoughts on why we fight and why we go to war. If you ask five people why we fight, you will get five different answers. Every American citizen has their own, unique view. One of the interviews includes Wilton Sekzer, a retired NYC cop, who lost his son during 9/11. He goes onto explain how he supported the Iraq War, because we were getting back at them for 9/11. Later, the president reveals that Iraq probably did not have any involvement during 9/11. Sekzer was furious because he was supporting a war that had no real purpose. This goes to show how easily persuaded Americans are by the government. High officials, like the president, will tell American citizens fallacies about wars, in hope it will create fear, which leads to patriotism and support.

  • Jan 31, 2019

    Make sure to clear your schedule if you plan on watching Eugene Jarecki's film Why We Fight. The excessive interviews, names, and lack of clarity will leave you wanting to stare at a blank wall for the next 8 hours to allow your brain to heal from the overstimulation. To give it to you simply, since Jarecki sure won't, the film is confusing. Jarecki's target audience seems to be Americans with photographic memories. When introducing a new person for the first time, Jarecki gives us the courtesy of displaying their name and occupation for a whopping 2 seconds. After that, as the film jumps from person to person, you are left trying to match names to faces. You will most likely spend more time asking yourself, "Wait who are you?" than "Why do we fight?" Jarecki may have been too good at his job. He found credible sources, just five times too many of them. He knows how to disperse the footage of a single interview, but does it too often. He is capable of thinking deeply and formulating opinions, but goes through the process too many times. Overall, the film contains many elements that makeup a good documentary, interviews, credible sources, striking footage, film manipulation, and valid points. It only seems to lack one thing: moderation.

    Make sure to clear your schedule if you plan on watching Eugene Jarecki's film Why We Fight. The excessive interviews, names, and lack of clarity will leave you wanting to stare at a blank wall for the next 8 hours to allow your brain to heal from the overstimulation. To give it to you simply, since Jarecki sure won't, the film is confusing. Jarecki's target audience seems to be Americans with photographic memories. When introducing a new person for the first time, Jarecki gives us the courtesy of displaying their name and occupation for a whopping 2 seconds. After that, as the film jumps from person to person, you are left trying to match names to faces. You will most likely spend more time asking yourself, "Wait who are you?" than "Why do we fight?" Jarecki may have been too good at his job. He found credible sources, just five times too many of them. He knows how to disperse the footage of a single interview, but does it too often. He is capable of thinking deeply and formulating opinions, but goes through the process too many times. Overall, the film contains many elements that makeup a good documentary, interviews, credible sources, striking footage, film manipulation, and valid points. It only seems to lack one thing: moderation.

  • Oct 09, 2015

    A must-see documentary. Truly revealing.

    A must-see documentary. Truly revealing.